Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Leading Christian Worship

Leading Christian Worship

Ratings: (0)|Views: 873|Likes:

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Dr Daniel K. Robinson on Sep 26, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/29/2012

pdf

text

original

 
 
Page
 
1
 
Leading
 
Christian
 
Worship
 
©
 
2012
 
Dr
 
Daniel
 
K.
 
Robinson
 
Leading
 
Christian
 
Worship
 
Objectives:
 
1.
 
Review
 
and
 
discuss
 
the
 
attributes
 
of 
 
the
 
modern
 
worship
 
leader.
 
2.
 
Survey
 
the
 
role
 
of 
 
the
 
worship
 
leader.
 
3.
 
Reflect
 
on
 
effective
 
planning
 
for
 
worship.
 
4.
 
Consider
 
strategies
 
for
 
effective
 
leadership
 
in
 
worship.
 
Outcomes:
 
The
 
aim
 
of 
 
this
 
session
 
is
 
to
 
provide
 
the
 
student
 
with
 
an
 
overview
 
of 
 
factors
 
that
 
contribute
 
to
 
the
 
leading
 
of 
 
Christian
 
worship.
 
The
 
session
 
will
 
survey
 
the
 
characteristics
 
required
 
for
 
the
 
leading
 
of 
 
worship
 
as
 
well
 
as
 
ideas
 
for
 
planning
 
and
 
leading
 
Christian
 
worship.
 
 A
Word
about 
Leadership
Leadership,
 
as
 
a
 
subject
 
area,
 
is
 
challenging
 
to
 
discuss
 
because
 
like
 
the
 
task
 
of 
 
defining
 
Christian
 
worship
 
it
 
means
 
different
 
things
 
to
 
different
 
people.
 
The
 
Concise
 
Oxford 
 
English
 
Dictionary 
 
(2008)
 
defines
 
a
 
leader
 
as
 
“the
 
person
 
who
 
leads
 
or
 
commands
 
a
 
group,
 
organisation,
 
or
 
country”
 
(p.
 
809).
 
Certainly,
 
leadership
 
within
 
the
 
Christian
 
context
 
is
 
directional
 
and
 
visionary
 
(as
 
the
 
above
 
definition
 
suggests)
 
but
 
it
 
is
 
important
 
to
 
qualify
 
this
 
further
 
with
 
Jesus
 
example
 
of 
 
leadership
 
as
 
servant
 
hood.
 
Jesus
 
taught
 
his
 
disciples
 
in
 
Matt
 
20:25–28:
 
You
 
know
 
that
 
the
 
rulers
 
of 
 
the
 
Gentiles
 
lord
 
it
 
over
 
them,
 
and
 
their
 
high
 
officials
 
exercise
 
authority
 
over
 
them.
 
Not
 
so
 
with
 
you.
 
Instead,
 
whoever
 
wants
 
to
 
become
 
great
 
among
 
you
 
must
 
be
 
your
 
servant,
 
and
 
whoever
 
wants
 
to
 
be
 
first
 
must
 
be
 
your
 
slave—just
 
as
 
the
 
Son
 
of 
 
Man
 
did
 
not
 
come
 
to
 
be
 
served,
 
but
 
to
 
serve,
 
and
 
to
 
give
 
his
 
life
 
as
 
a
 
ransom
 
for
 
many.
 
Leading
 
Christian
 
worship
 
must
 
be
 
approached
 
with
 
the
 
attitude
 
of 
 
a
 
servant.
 
Readings
• Kauflin
 
(2008).
 
Worship
 
Matters.
Chapters
 
6–17
 
(pp.
 
51–152).• Kraeuter
 
(1991).
 
Keys
 
to
 
becoming
 
an
 
effective
 
Worship
 
Leader.
 
Read
 
complete
 
text.
 
• Segler
 
&
 
Bradley
 
(2006).
 
Christian
 
Worship.
Chapters
 
21–23
 
(pp.
 
261–294).• Siewert
 
(1998).
 
Worship
 
Team
 
Handbook.
 
Read
 
complete
 
text.
 
 
Christian
 
Worship
 
PC315/515
 
 
Page
 
2
 
Leading
 
Christian
 
Worship
 
©
 
2012
 
Dr
 
Daniel
 
K.
 
Robinson
 
1.
 
Spiritual
Leadership
The
 
notion
 
of 
 
leadership
 
being
 
driven
 
by
 
an
 
attitude
 
of 
 
servant
 
hood
 
does
 
not
 
always
 
sit
 
naturally/comfortably
 
on
 
our
 
human
 
shoulders.
 
Indeed,
 
it
 
is
 
not
 
always
 
the
 
leader
 
themselves
 
that
 
seeks
 
to
 
make
 
themselves
 
‘first
 
and
 
foremost’
 
among
 
the
 
people
 
of 
 
God.
 
Rory
 
Noland
 
(1999)
 
writes,
 
“Our
 
society
 
tends
 
to
 
put
 
anybody
 
who
 
has
 
talent
 
on
 
a
 
pedestal.
 
We
 
turn
 
the
 
most
 
successful
 
artists
 
into
 
superstars.
 
The
 
superstars
 
are
 
indulged
 
and
 
pampered.
 
They
 
become
 
rich
 
and
 
famous.
 
So
 
servant
 
hood
 
and
 
being
 
others
orientated
 
doesn’t
 
come
 
naturally
 
for
 
any
 
of 
 
us”
 
(p.
 
53).
 
What
 
then
 
are
 
the
 
attributes
 
of 
 
the
 
Christian
 
leader?
 
It
 
is
 
helpful
 
here
 
to
 
designate
 
the
 
role
 
of 
 
the
 
worship
 
leader
 
as
 
‘spiritual
 
leadership’.
 
We
 
have
 
many
 
examples
 
of 
 
spiritual
 
leadership
 
throughout
 
the
 
bible:
 
In
 
tabernacle
 
and
 
temple
 
worship,
 
the
 
spiritual
 
leaders
 
were
 
the
 
priests.
 
In
 
the
 
synagogue,
 
it
 
was
 
the
 
elders.
 
In
 
the
 
early
 
church,
 
the
 
pastors
 
and
 
elders
 
were
 
responsible
 
for
 
the
 
worship
 
of 
 
the
 
congregation.
 
Paul’s
 
practical
 
instructions
 
to
 
Timothy
 
on
 
worship
 
(e.g.
 
1
 
Tim.
 
2;
 
4:13;
 
2
 
Tim.
 
4:2)
 
show
 
that
 
Timothy,
 
the
 
pastor
 
of 
 
the
 
Ephesian
 
church,
 
had
 
the
 
authority
 
to
 
set
 
the
 
pattern,
 
priorities
 
and
 
participants
 
in
 
the
 
worship
 
service.
 
(Sweetman,
 
2012,
 
p.
 
2)
 
It
 
is
 
here
 
that
 
we
 
must
 
recognise
 
the
 
differences
 
in
 
approach
 
to
 
the
 
leadership
 
of 
 
worship;
 
and
 
who
 
is
 
considered
 
‘able’
 
in
 
the
 
provision
 
of 
 
spiritual
 
leadership
 
within
 
the
 
worship
 
construct.
 
Throughout
 
church
 
history
 
the
 
responsibility
 
of 
 
leading
 
worship
 
has
 
sat
 
on
 
the
 
shoulders
 
of 
 
the
 
ordained
 
ministry
1
.
 
Most
 
recently,
 
the
 
evolving
 
prominence
 
of 
 
music
 
within
 
the
 
worship
 
setting
 
has
 
caused
 
the
 
musicians,
 
especially
 
the
 
role
 
of 
 
the
 
lead
 
musician
 
(often
 
called
 
the
 
song
 
leader
 
or
 
worship
 
leader)
 
to
 
unwittingly
 
draw
 
attention.
 
In
 
some
 
instances
 
(e.g.
 
the
 
contemporary
 
worship
 
setting)
 
the
 
worship
 
leader
 
may
 
be
 
more
 
prominent
 
than
 
the
 
senior
 
minister/pastor.
 
This
 
has
 
caused
 
some
 
tension.
 
Normally,
 
pastors
 
do
 
not
 
have
 
the
 
musical
 
knowledge
 
to
 
lead
 
the
 
team
 
of 
 
musicians
 
and
 
congregational
 
singing.
 
Similarly
 
musicians
 
do
 
not
 
typically
 
have
 
the
 
scriptural
 
knowledge
 
and
 
understanding
 
to
 
guide
 
the
 
congregation
 
on
 
their
 
spiritual
 
 journey
 
and
 
development.
 
John
 
Sweetman
 
(2012)
 
offers
 
four
 
different
 
approaches
 
to
 
this
 
conundrum
 
(p.
 
2):
 
1.
 
The
 
church
 
can
 
find
 
a
 
spiritual
 
leader
 
who
 
is
 
also
 
a
 
musician.
 
2.
 
A
 
pastor/spiritual
 
leader
 
can
 
lead
 
the
 
worship
 
assisted
 
by
 
a
 
musician.
 
3.
 
A
 
musician
 
can
 
lead
 
the
 
service
 
with
 
the
 
pastor/spiritual
 
leader
 
contributing
 
to
 
both
 
the
 
preparation
 
of 
 
the
 
service
 
and
 
important
 
spiritual
 
times
 
in
 
the
 
service
 
(including
 
the
 
worship
 
after
 
the
 
preaching).
 
4.
 
A
 
musician
 
can
 
lead
 
the
 
service
 
under
 
the
 
oversight
 
of 
 
a
 
pastor/spiritual
 
leader
 
who
 
helps
 
both
 
in
 
preparing
 
and
 
developing
 
the
 
leadership
 
of 
 
the
 
service.
 
The
 
musician
 
may
 
be
 
encouraged
 
to
 
gain
 
some
 
biblical
 
training
 
and
 
to
 
grow
 
as
 
a
 
spiritual
 
leader.
 
Regardless
 
of 
 
the
 
choice
 
made
 
the
 
overarching
 
notion
 
of 
 
spiritual
 
leadership
 
remains.
 
Every
 
aspect
 
of 
 
the
 
worship
 
service
 
is
 
(or
 
should
 
be)
 
a
 
spiritual
 
act.
 
“Corporate
 
worship
 
is
 
far
 
too
 
important
 
to
 
God
 
and
 
the
 
church
 
to
 
leave
 
it
 
to
 
those
 
who
 
are
 
not
 
called
 
or
 
gifted
 
to
 
lead
 
the
 
people
 
spiritually”
 
(Sweetman,
 
2012,
 
p.
 
2).
 
1
 
Except
 
for
 
the
 
Quakers
 
and
 
the
 
Brethren
 
who
 
hold
 
to
 
the
 
literal
 
ideal
 
of 
 
‘every
 
member
 
a
 
minister’.
 
 
 
Christian
 
Worship
 
PC315/515
 
 
Page
 
3
 
Leading
 
Christian
 
Worship
 
©
 
2012
 
Dr
 
Daniel
 
K.
 
Robinson
 
2.
 
Qualities
of 
a
Worship
Leader
Having
 
dealt
 
with
 
the
 
subject
 
of 
 
spiritual
 
leadership
 
in
 
the
 
broader
 
sense
 
we
 
now
 
turn
 
our
 
attention
 
to
 
the
 
‘qualities’
 
or
 
the
 
modern
 
worship
 
leader.
 
Perhaps
 
it
 
is
 
not
 
necessary
 
to
 
state
 
(but
 
I’m
 
going
 
to
 
anyway
 
)
 
that
 
the
 
following
 
characteristics
 
are
 
ideals
 
to
 
be
 
pursued,
 
not
 
necessarily
 
perfected.
 
That
 
is,
 
ultimately
 
our
 
righteousness
 
and
 
sense
 
of 
 
achievement
 
does
 
not
 
make
 
our
 
worship
 
any
 
more
 
(or
 
less)
 
acceptable
 
to
 
God.
 
Our
 
worship
 
is
 
only
 
made
 
acceptable
 
through
 
the
 
perfect
 
sacrifice
 
of 
 
Christ;
 
the
 
only
 
perfect
 
worship
 
leader!
 
Constance
 
Cherry
 
(2010)
 
reminds
 
us,
 
The
 
cornerstone
 
of 
 
Christian
 
worship
 
is
 
Jesus
 
Christ”
 
(p.
 
21).
 
With
 
the
 
cornerstone
 
securely
 
in
 
place
 
let’s
 
now
 
survey
 
the
 
universally
 
acceptable
 
qualities
 
of 
 
today’s
 
worship
 
leader
2
.
 
Character
 
&
 
Heart
 
Unlike
 
the
 
roles
 
of 
 
elders
 
and
 
deacons,
 
we
 
have
 
no
 
explicit
 
scriptural
 
direction
 
as
 
to
 
the
 
character
 
of 
 
the
 
worship
 
leader.
 
It
 
is
 
therefore
 
left
 
to
 
us
 
to
 
align
 
our
 
review
 
with
 
the
 
general
 
expectations
 
required
 
of 
 
all
 
Christian
 
spiritual
 
leadership.
 
Consider
 
the
 
following
 
characteristics:
 
 
Walking
 
in
 
God’s
 
Grace
 
(Eph.
 
2:8–9):
 
as
 
noted
 
above,
 
our
 
worship
 
falls
 
short
 
of 
 
the
 
mark
 
outside
 
of 
 
Jesus’
 
tremendous
 
work
 
of 
 
grace.
 
Jesus
 
is
 
our
 
mediator
 
in
 
worship
 
(I
 
Tim.
 
2:5):
 
Jesus
 
served
 
as
 
our
 
mediator
 
when
 
he
 
willingly
 
endured
 
God’s
 
wrath
 
against
 
our
 
sins
 
at
 
the
 
cross,
 
even
 
though
 
he
 
himself 
 
was
 
completely
 
innocent.
 
Jesus
 
served
 
as
 
our
 
mediator
 
when
 
we
 
became
 
our
 
substitute
 
to
 
receive
 
the
 
punishment
 
we
 
deserved,
 
after
 
which
 
the
 
Father
 
raised
 
him
 
from
 
the
 
dead,
 
demonstrating
 
the
 
sufficiency
 
of 
 
his
 
sacrifice.
 
Jesus
 
was
 
our
 
mediator
 
when
 
he
 
embraced
 
the
 
torment
 
of 
 
separation
 
from
 
God
 
so
 
we
 
could
 
live
 
with
 
God
 
forever.
 
This
 
is
 
the
 
good
 
news
 
of 
 
the
 
gospel.
 
This
 
is
 
the
 
means
 
by
 
which
 
we
 
can
 
now
 
worship
 
God.
 
(Kauflin,
 
2008,
 
p.
 
71)
 
 
Living
 
with
 
Integrity 
 
(Rom.
 
12:1–2):
 
every
 
Christian
 
is
 
called
 
to
 
live
 
a
 
life
 
of 
 
integrity.
 
Integrity
 
can
 
be
 
understood
 
to
 
be
 
a
 
state
 
of 
 
“internal
 
consistency”
 
(Soanes
 
&
 
Stevenson,
 
2008,
 
p.
 
738).
 
When
 
discussing
 
integrity
 
Christians
 
are
 
often
 
asked
 
to
 
consider
 
who
 
they
 
are
 
when
 
they
 
are
 
alone.
 
Equally,
 
worship
 
leaders
 
can
 
be
 
challenged
 
to
 
consider
 
who
 
they
 
are
 
when
 
they
 
are
 
not
 
leading
 
worship.
 
Certainly,
 
no
 
one
 
is
 
perfect
 
but
 
there
 
should
 
be
 
a
 
sense
 
of 
 
consistency.
 
 
Personal 
 
relationship
 
with
 
God 
 
(Phil 
 
3:10):
 
leading
 
worship
 
requires
 
a
 
sense
 
of 
 
spiritual
 
direction.
 
It
 
also
 
needs
 
a
 
person
 
who
 
has,
 
and
 
seeks
 
to
 
maintain,
 
an
 
active
 
relationship
 
with
 
God.
 
“You
 
cannot
 
lead
 
others
 
to
 
worship
 
a
 
God
 
you
 
do
 
not
 
know
 
and
 
love”
 
(Sweetman,
 
2012,
 
p.
 
3).
 
Of 
 
course,
 
this
 
does
 
not
 
2
 
The
 
following
 
framework
 
(Character/Attitude/Skills)
 
for
 
reviewing
 
the
 
‘Qualities
 
of 
 
a
 
Worship
 
Leader’
 
has
 
been
 
gleaned
 
from
 
the
 
work
 
of 
 
John
 
Sweetman
 
(2012).
 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->