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Read Out Program 2012

Read Out Program 2012

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Published by Colleen Ryan

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Published by: Colleen Ryan on Sep 26, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/13/2014

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and 
 
 present 
 
Read Out!
Celebrating 30 years of liberating literature.September 28, 2012
 
Rob Curry
Rob Curry is the Senior Vice President at UpperHudson Planned Parenthood. This is his secondyear participating in the ReadOut, and he is onceagain honored to be invited to read at thisevent. Rob has spent his adult life trying to be a voice for the underserved and those who do nothave a voice, or are afraid to speak their voice.
 
Rob will be reading a passage from
I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings 
by Maya Angelou. Rob be-
came a fan of Ms. Angelou’s when she was poet
laureate under the Clinton administration, and when she read her great
Inaugural Poem 
about
diversity at President Clinton’s inauguration on
 January 23, 1993.
 What are you reading and why?
 
I had the honor of hear-ing Ms. Angelou speak  when she visited Albany at the Palace Theater afew years ago, when Ichaperoned a group of high risk middle school
girls from Albany’s
poorest urban areas, tosee her and hear herspeak her life story.
 
 Thepassage I am reading represents both the anxi-ety that every one of usexperienced as an adolescent, as well as a univer-sal message about diversity.
I believe Maya’s
 writing is especially important today when those
 who “have” often forget what it is like to be oneof those who “have nothing,” but still find the
energy to make a difference. That is why thecaged bird sings.
 
Mary Darcy
Mary is one of the foundersof Alloveralbany.com. A former public radioand television pro-ducer, she has won twoGracie Allen awardsfor her work on
Her Story 
, a series of audiobiographies of great women in science voice by 
Star Trek’s 
Kate Mulgrew. Shealso received a New  York State Broad-
caster’s Award for
 NoOrdinary Lives 
, a documentary about life in Troy during WWII. Mary is currently a member of  The Mop & Bucket Improv Company where,every Friday night, she makes up funny things inan effort to elicit laughter
 — 
the loveliest soundin the universe.
 What are you reading and why?
I’m reading from
 
To Kill a Mockingbird 
. Harper
Lee describes Atticus Finch by saying “Some
men were born to do our unpleasant jobs for
us.”
My dad was one of those men. He had anincredibly strong moral compass. Like Atticus,he could always be counted on to do the rightthing. A lifelong Brooklyn boy, he joined theservice in the early 1960s and was stationed inthe south, where he purposely rode in the backsof buses and took a stand against racism andinjustice.
To Kill a Mockingbird 
always makes methink of Dad
 — 
the way he stood up for therights of others and lived with dignity. It in-spires me to live the same way.
 
Cathy Laccetti
 
Cathy has worked for the State of New York in various capacities since 1981. She has alsotaught Sunday school, served on the Voorhees- ville PTA as Marketing Chair, was active in her
daughter’s Girl Scout Troop and her son’s Boy 
Scout Troop, has watched numerous soccer,baseball, basketball, cross country events, etc., ingood weather and in bad, and is currently amember of the Voorheesville Dollars for Schol-ars Chapter. Now that her children are older,she is trading in her min-van and concentrating on herself! Cathy is presently attending EmpireState College part-time working towards a degreein Fine Arts and is hoping her next career is inthe arts.
 What are you reading and why?
  At first, I thought I would read from a book by a well-known author,such as Mark Twain,F. Scott Fitzgerald, Toni Morrison, or John Steinbeck; but Ikept having thisflashback of my oldersister and me in oursuburban Long Is-land paneled base-ment reading 
Steal this Book
by Abbie Hoff-man (1970). She wasa teenager and I wasa preteen, and we thought we were so cool read-ing this book against the establishment. We even
tried out one of his suggestions, which I’ll tell
you about tonight.
It didn’t go well…
 
Gary Maggio
Gary Maggio is somewhat retired, working part-time happily as a Standardized Patient at Albany 
Medical College. Otherwise, he’s a visual artist, a
theatre actor, a good cook, and a solidly erratictennis amateur. His reading selection,
and tangomakes three 
, has themes of inclusion, family val-ues, and respect for differences which appeal tohim, and he finds it fascinating and not surpris-ing that it is the most banned book in America.

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