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War of 1812 Artifact Repatriation Ceremony: September 27, 2012 / Cérémonie de rapatriement des objets de la guerre de 1812 : le 27 septembre 2012

War of 1812 Artifact Repatriation Ceremony: September 27, 2012 / Cérémonie de rapatriement des objets de la guerre de 1812 : le 27 septembre 2012

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Published by LG Ontario
Program from the ceremony marking the return to Ontario of artifacts belonging to Sir Roger Hale Sheaffe, Upper Canada’s seventh viceregal representative and hero of the War of 1812.

Le programme de la cérémonie célébrant le rapatriement des articles appartenant à Sir Roger Hale Sheaffe, le septième représentant vice-royal du Haut-Canada et héros de la guerre de 1812.
Program from the ceremony marking the return to Ontario of artifacts belonging to Sir Roger Hale Sheaffe, Upper Canada’s seventh viceregal representative and hero of the War of 1812.

Le programme de la cérémonie célébrant le rapatriement des articles appartenant à Sir Roger Hale Sheaffe, le septième représentant vice-royal du Haut-Canada et héros de la guerre de 1812.

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Published by: LG Ontario on Sep 27, 2012
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11/29/2012

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27 September 2012Queen’s Park 
 Artiact Repatriation Ceremony 
Sir Roger Hale Sheafe 
President o the Executive Council(Acting Lieutenant Governor) o Upper Canada 1812–1813
 
Sir Roger Hale Sheafe 
by Mather Brown.Reproduction o original oil on canvas.Collection o the Duke o Northumberland, Alnwick Castle.
 A message rom the Honourable David C. Onley,Lieutenant Governor o Ontario
Searching or a Portrait, Finding a Uniorm
Te path leading to the repatriation o the uniorm and artiacts belonging to Sir Roger Hale Sheae, and the discovery o his ocial portrait, is like anepisode o 
History Detectives 
: the search or one thing uncovered several others.Te Oce o the Lieutenant Governor has a large but incompleteportraiture collection o the 42 vice-regal representatives since 1791.I wrote to the Archivist o Ontario in June 2008 asking  who was missing and was told that no portraits existed orsix, mostly prominently, Sir Roger Hale Sheae. Ater General Isaac Brock’s death at the battle o Queenston Heights,Sheae took command and engineered a great military victory.Tis led me to search the internet to learn more about Sir Roger, whereupon I ound the Sheae amily’s Australian website, replete with pictureso their visit to Queenston Heights in the 1990s and photos o Sir Roger’sdescendants wearing his uniorm rom 1812. Most incredibly, the site proudly eatured Sir Roger’s portrait, the missing item rom Ontario’s collection! As we moved closer to the bicentennial o 1812, local Niagara residentLinda Stanley, along with John Wright, chair o Wounded Warriors, began tocollaborate with the Sheae amily and the Oce o the Lieutenant Governorin a long process to secure the uniorm’s return to Ontario.Countless emails later, the Sheae amily decided to donate the uniorm andartiacts that their amily had careully preserved over the last two centuries and tocome to Ontario or the 200th anniversary o the Battle o Queenston Heights.Meanwhile, it was discovered that the portrait on the Sheae amily  website hung at Alnwick Castle in England, maintained by the Duke o Northumberland, whose amily members were the original patrons o Sir Roger.In short order, the duke sent a digital image o the portrait, and atercareul work by the Archives o Ontario, the image was placed upon canvasand ramed, appearing nearly indistinguishable rom the original work.So, a simple letter rom our years ago has resulted in the repatriation o the uniorm o the victor o Queenston Heights, and, or the frst time, theinclusion in Ontario’s ocial art collection o the portrait o the seventh vice-regal representative in Upper Canada,Sir Roger Hale Sheae.
 
Biographical sketch o  Sir Roger Hale Sheafe 
Canadians who view the War o 1812 as an excuse to prod our American neighbours about the British having burned down their White House might be surprised to know that Roger Hale Sheae wasactually an American, having been born in Massachusetts in 1763.Sheae’s adolescence was careully watched over by theDuke o Northumberland, who had established his North Americanbase in Boston during the American War or Independence. Te dukesent Sheae to boarding school in England, where he received military training. Ater perorming duties in Ireland, Québec, and UpperCanada, he was sent by Lieutenant Governor John Graves Simcoe to an Aboriginal community to protest illegal seizures o native lands by anunscrupulous settlement agent. In 1795, Sheae was promoted to captain.During the late 1790s and early 1800s, Sheae came to know Sir Isaac Brock, and the two served together or many years.Despite Sheae’s reputation or being a harsh commander, heattained the rank o colonel in 1808, and major-general in 1811.Sheae returned to Upper Canada rom a stay in England in July 1812,and was again appointed to serve under Brock’s command. On August 18,he arrived at Fort George to command the orces at Niagara. Te Americansattacked Queenston on October 13, and Sheae was let to lead the deensiveorces at Fort George while Brock took command o the battlefeld. Brock died in battle, leaving Sheae as leader o the area’s British and Aboriginalorces. Shortly thereater, the Americans were pushed back, with nearly 1000being taken prisoner. Sheae was lauded or his deence o Queenston.During the winter months o 1812–1813, he spent much o his time atNiagara in poor health and preoccupied about military deence. Brock’sdeath caused Sheae to become the military commander in Upper Canada,as well as president and civil administrator o the province’s government.He opened the Upper Canadian parliament on February 25, 1813,and gave royal assent to many bills, the most notable o which was toprovide support or the widows o the soldiers that ought in the war.By mid-1813, the public was becoming increasingly weary o Sheae’s cautious deensive strategy and his American roots. On June 19, he was relieved o his military and civil commands, and wasordered to serve in the Montréal region until his return to Englandin November. He would remain a proessional soldier throughouthis adult lie, and was promoted to the rank o lieutenant-general in1821, and general in 1838. He died in Edinburgh on July 17, 1851.
List o artiacts 
British presentation sword; leather scabbard with gildbronze decoration; leather waist belt embroidered with gilt thread and embellished with gilt bronzeBritish Army general’s coat o scarlet wool; white cotton clovesKing George III royal warrant dated rom 1812 granting armsto Roger Hale Sheae; two tins containing wax sealsKing George III letters patent dated January 30, 1813 bestowing upon Roger Hale Sheae the title o baronetGold pocket watch and accompanying accessories

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