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Karna, Salya, Sauptika & Stree Parvas

Karna, Salya, Sauptika & Stree Parvas

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Published by: Rasakali Satyapujari on Sep 29, 2012
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11/22/2013

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THE
MAHABHARATA
OF
KRISHNA-DWAIPAYANA
VYASA
Translated
into
English
prose
from
the
original
Sanskrit
Text.
BY
PRATAP
CHANDRA
ROY,
C.
I.
c.
VOL
VII
KARNA,
SALYA,
SAUPTIKA
and
STREE
PARVAS
ORIENTALPUBLISHING
CO.
11D,
ARPULI
LANE
CALCUTTA-12
 
THE
MAHABHARATA
KARNA
PARVA
SECTION
I
Having
bowed
down
unto
Narayana,
and
unto
that
most
exalted
of
male
beinge,
viz.,
Narci,
and
unto
the
goddess
Saraswati
also,
must
the
word
JAYA
be
uttered.
Vaisampayana
said,
"After
Drona
bad
been
slain,
O
monarch,
the
royal
warriors
(of
the
Kaurava
army)
headed
by
Duryodhana,
with
hearts
filled
with
great
anxiety,
all
repaired
to
Drona's
Son.
Lamenting
the
loss
of
Drona,
anddeprived
of
energy
in
consequence
of
theircheerless-
ness,
they
sat
around
the
son
of
Saradwat's
daughter,
afflicted
with
grief.
Comforted
fora
little
while
by
considerations
founded
upon
the
scrip-
tures,
when
night
came,
those
rulers
of
Earth
proceeded
to
their
respec-
tive
tents.
Those
lords
of
Earth,
however,
O
thou
of
Kuru's
race,
could
feel
HO
happiness
in
their
abodes.
Thinking
of
that
immense
slaughter,
they
could
not
also
sleep.
The
Suta's
son
(Kama),
and
king
Suyodhana
and
Dussasana
and
Sakuni,
inspecial,
could
not
compose
themselves
to
sleep.
Those
four
passed
that
night
together
in
Duryodhana's
tent,
reflecting
upon
the
woes
they
had
inflicted
upon
the
highsouled
Pandavas.
Formerly
they
hadbrought
Draupadi,
plunged
into
woe
on
account
of
the
match
atdice,
into
the
assembly.
Recollecting
it
they
experienced
great
regret,
their
hearts
being
filled
with
anxiety.
Thinking
of
those
sufferings
inflicted
(upon
the
Pandavas)
in
consequence
of
the
gambling
match,
they
passed
that
night
in
sorrow,
O
king,
as
if
it
were
really
a
hundred
years.
Thenwhen
morning
came,
observing
the
dictates
of
the
ordinance,
all
of
them
duly
went
through
the
customary
rites.
Having
gonethrough
these
customary
rites
and
comforted
to
some
extent,
O
Bharata,they
ordered
their
troops
to
be
arrayed,
and
then
came
out
for
battle,
having
made
Kama
their
generalissimo
by
tying
theauspicious
thread
round
his
wrists,
and
having
caused
many
foremost
of
Brahmanas,
by
presents
of
vessels
ofcurds,
clarified
butter,
Akshatas,
coins
of
gold,
kine,
jewels
and
gems,
and
costlyrobes,
to
pray
for
their
victory,
and
having
caused
heralds
and
musicians,
and
panegyrists
to
adore
them
 
2
MAHABHARATA
with
hymns
about
victory.
1
The
Pandavas
also,
O
king,
having
gone
through
their
morning
rites,
issued
from
their
camp,
resolved
on
battle.
Then
commenced
a
fierce
battle,
making
the
hair
to
stand
on
end,
be-
tween
the
Kurus
and
the
Pandavas,
each
desirous
of
vanquishing
the
other.
During
the
commandership
of
Kama,
the
battle
that
took
place
between
the
Kuru
and
the
Pandava
troops
was
exceedingly
fierce
and
lasted
for
two
days.
Then
Vrisha
(Kama)
having
made
an
immense
slaughter
of
his
enemies
in
battle,
was
at
last
slainin
the
sight
of
the
Dhartarashtras,
by
Arjuna.
Then
Sanjaya,
repairing
to
Hastinapura
told
Dhritarashtra
all
that
had
happened
at
Kurujangala."
Janamejaya
said,
"Having
heard
of
the
fall
of
Bhishma
and
that
other
mighty
car-warrior,
viz,
Drona,
the
old
king
Dhritarashtra
the
son
of
Amvika
had
been
afflicted
with
great
grief.
How,
O
foremost
of
Brahmanas,
could
he,
plnnged
into
grief,
support
his
life
having
heard
of
the
death
of
Kama,
that
well-wisher
of
Duryodhana
?
How
indeed,
could
that
descendant
of
Kuru
support
his
life
when
he,
upon
whom,
that
monarch
had
restedthe
hope
of
his
sons'
victory
had
fallen
?
When
the
king
did
not
lay
down
his
life
even
after
hearing
of
Kama's
death,
I
think
that
it
is
very
difficult
for
men
to
yield
up
life
even
under
circumstances
of
great
grief
!
O
Brahman,
when
the
king
did
not
yield
up
his
life
after
hearing
of
the
fall
of
the
venerable
son
of
Santanu,
of
Valhika
and
Drona
andSomadatta
and
Bhurisravas,
as
also
other
friends
and
his
sons
and
grandsons,
I
think,
O
regenerate
one,
thatthe
act
of
yielding
up
one's
life
is
exceedingly
difficult
!
Tell
me
all
these
in
detail
and
as
they
actually
happened
!
I
am
not
satiated
with
hearing
the
high
achievements
of
my
ancestors
!"
SECTION
II
Vaisampayana
said,
"Upon
the
fall
of
Kama,
O
monarch,
the
son
of
Gavalgana,
with
a
cheerless
heart,set
out
that
night
for
Nagapura,
on
steedsthat
rivalled
the
wind
in
speed.
Arrived
at
Hastinapura,
with
a
heart
filled
with
deep
anxiety,
he
proceeded
to
Dhritarashtra's
abode
which
no
longer
teemed
with
kinsmen
and
friends.
Belolding
theking
deprived
of
all
energy
by
grief,
joining
his
hands
he
worshipped,
with
a
bend
of
his
head,
the
monarch's
feet.
Having
duly
worshipped
king
Dhritarashtra,
he
uttered
an
exclamation
of
woe
and
then
began,
'I
am
Sanjaya,
O
lord
of
Earth
!
Art
thou
not
happy
?
I
hopethou
art
not
1
Akshatas
were
probably
Purna-patras,
i.e.
certainvessels
full
to
brim
with
oorn
and
other
articles
of
use.
The
fullness
is
indicative
of
auspioiousness.
T.

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