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Santi Parva(Part II)

Santi Parva(Part II)

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Published by: Rasakali Satyapujari on Sep 29, 2012
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07/02/2014

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THE
MAHABHARATA
OF
KRISHNA-DWAIPAYANA
VYASA
Translated
into
English
prose
from
the
original
Sanskrit
Text.
BY
PRATAP
CHANDRA
ROY,
C.
I.
E.
VOL
IX
SANTI
PARVA
(Part
II)
ORIENTAL
PUBLISHING
CO.
11D,
SURENDRALAL
PYNE
LANE
CALCUTTA-12
 
THE
MAHABHARATA
SANTI
PARVA
SECTION
CLXXIV
(
Mokshadharma
Parva
)
"Yudhishthira
said,
'Thou
hast,
O
grandsire,
discoursed
upon
the
auspicious
duties
(
of
person
in
distress
)
connectedwith
the
duties
of
kings.It
behoveth
thee
now,
O
king,
to
tell
me
those
foremost
of
duties
which
belong
to
those
who
lead
the
(four)
modes
of
life.'
"Bhishma
said,
'Keligion
hath
many
doors.
The
observance
of
(the
dutiesprescribed
by)
religion
can
never
be
futile.
Duties
have
been
laid
down
with
respect
to
every
mode
of
life.
(The
fruitsof
those
duties
are
invisible,
being
attainable
in
the
next
world).
The
fruits,
however,
of
Penance
directed
towards
the
soul
are
obtainable
in
this
world.
1
Whatever
be
the
object
to
which
one
devotes
oneself,
that
object,
O
Bharata,
and
nothing
else,
appears
to
one
as
the
highest
of
acquisitions
fraught
with
the
greatest
of
blessings.
When
one
reflects
properly
(one's
heartbeing
purified
by
such
reflection),
one
comes
to
know
thatthe
things
of
this
world
are
asvaluelessas
straw.
Without
doubt,
one
is
then
freed
from
attach-
ment
in
respect
of
those
things.
When
the
world,
Yudhishthira,
which
is
full
of
defects,
is
so
constituted,
every
man
of
intelligence
should
strive
for
the
attainment
of
the
emancipation
of
his
soul.'
"Yudhishthira
said,
'Tell
me,
grandsire,
by
what
frame
of
soul
should
one
kill
one's
grief
when
one
loses
one's
wealth,
or
when
one's
wife,
or
son,
or
sire,
dies.'
"Bhishma
said,
'When
one's
wealth
is
lost,
or
one'swife
or
son
or
sire
is
dead,
one
certainly
says
to
oneself,
'Alas,
this
is
a
great
sorrow
1'
But
thenone
should,
by
the
aid
of
reflection,
seek
to
kill
that
sorrow.
In
this
connection
is
cited
the
old
story
of
the
speech
that
a
regenerate
friend
of
his,
coming
to
Senajit's
court,
made
to
that
king.
Beholding
the
monarch
1
It
is
very
difficult
to
literally
translate
such
verses.
The
word
DUarma
is
sometimes
used
in
the
sense
of
Eeligion
or
the
aggregate
of
duties.
At
other
times
it
simply
means
a
duty
or
thecourse
of
duties
pres-
cribed
for
a
particular
situation.
Tapah
is
generally
renderedpenance.
Here,
however,
it
has
a
direct
reference
to
sravana
(hearing),
manana
(
contemplation
),
and
nididhyasana
(
abstruction
of
the
soul
from
every-
thing
else
for
absolute
concentration).
The
Grammar
of
the
second
half
of
the
first
line
is
Sati
apretya
&c.
t
Satbeing
that
which
is
real,
hence,
the
Soul,or
the
Supreme
Soul,
of
which
every
individual
Soul
is
only
a
portion.
T.
 
2
MAHABHABATA
agitated
with
grief
and
burning
with
sorrow
on
account
of
the
death
of
his
son,
the
Brahmana
addressed
that
ruler
of
very
cheerless
heart
and
said
these
words,
'Why
art
thou
stupefied
?
Thou
art
without
any
intelligence.
Thyself
an
object
of
grief,
why
dost
thou
grieve
(for
others)
?
A
few
days
hence
others
will
grieve
for
thee,
and
in
their
turn
they
will
be
grieved
for
by
others.
Thyself,
myself,
and
others
who
wait
upon
thee,
O
king,
shall
all
go
to
that
place
whence
all
of
us
have
come."
"Senajit
said,
'What
is
that
intelligence,
what
is
that
penance,
learned
Brahmana,
what
is
that
concentration
of
mind,thou
that
hast
wealth
of
asceticism,
what
is
that
knowledge,
and
what
is
that
learning,
by
acquiring
which
thou
dost
not
yield
to
sorrow
?'
"The
Brahmana
said,
'Behold,
all
creatures,
the
superior,
the
mid-
dling,
and
the
inferior,
in
consequence
of
their
respective
acts,
are
entangled
in
grief.
I
do
not
regard
even
my
own
self
to
be
mine.
On
theother
hand,
I
regard
the
whole
world
to
be
mine.
I
againthink
that
all
this
(which
I
see)
is
as
much
mine
as
it
belongs
to
others.
Grief
cannot
approach
me
in
consequence
of
this
thought.
Having
acquired
such
an
understanding,
I
do
not
yield
eitherto
joy
or
to
grief.
As
two
pieces
of
wood
floating
on
the
ocean
come
together
at
one
time
and
are
again
separa-
ted,
even
such
is
the
union
of
(living)
creatures
inthis
world.
Sons,grand-
sons,
kinsmen,
relatives
are
all
of
this
kind.
One
shouldnever
feel
affection
for
them,
for
separation
with
them
is
certain.
Thy
son
came
from
an
invisible
region.
He
has
departed
and
become
invisible.
He
did
not
know
thee.
Thou
didst
not
know
him.
Who
art
thou
and
for
whom
dost
thou
grieve
?
Grieve
arises
from
the
disease
constituted
by
desire.
Happi-
ness
again
results
from
the
disease
of
desire
being
cured.
From
joy
also
springssorrow,
and
hencesorrow
arises
repeatedly.
Sorrow
comes
after
joy,
and
joy
after
sorrow.
The
joys
and
sorrows
of
human
beings
are
revolving
on
a
wheel.
After
happiness
sorrowhas
come
to
thee.
Thou
shalt
again
have
happiness.
No
one
suffers
sorrow
for
ever,
and
no^ne
enjoys
happiness
(or
ever.
The
body
is
the
refuge
of
bothsorrow
and
happiness.
1
Whatever
acts
anembodied
creature
does
with
the
aid
of
his
body,
the
consequence
thereof
he
has
to
suffer
in
that
body.
Life
springs
with
the
springing
of
the
body
into
existence.
The
two
exist
together,
and
the
two
perish
together.*
Men
of
uncleansed
souls,
wedded
to
worldly
things
by
variousbonds,
meet
with
destruction
like
embankments
of
sand
in
water.
Woes
of
diversekinds,
born
of
ignorance,
act
like
pressers
of
oil-seeds,
for
assailing
all
creatures
in
consequence
of
their
attachments.
These
press
them
like
oil-seeds
in
the
oil-making
machine
represented
by
the
round
of
rebirths
(to
which
they
are
subject).
Man,
for
the
sake
of
his
wife
(and
others),
commits
numerous
evil
acts,
but
suffers
singly
diverse
kinds
of
misery
both
inthis
1
And
not
the
Soul,
as
the
commentator
explains.
With
the
death
of
the
body
joy
and
grief
disappear.
T.
2
The
art
by
which
the
body
could,
as
in
Egypt,
be
preserved
for
thousands
of
years
was
not
known
to
the
Rishis.T.

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