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Red Bank Squadron - 09/02/1943

Red Bank Squadron - 09/02/1943

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Published by CAP History Library
Civil Air Patrol - New Jersey
Civil Air Patrol - New Jersey

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: CAP History Library on Oct 03, 2012
Copyright:Public Domain

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RED BANK REGISTER
•%
VOLUME LXVI, NO. 11.RED BANK, N. J., THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1943.SECTION ONE—PAGES 1 TO
12
x
MoreThan$70,000Collected For Hospital
Monmouth Memorial DriveGoes Well Over Quota
Tha moat successful campaign forfunds ever launched by MonmouthMemorial hospital of Long Branchcame to a close yesterday afternfton•with a tea for campaign chairmen,vice chairmen and members of (hespecial gifts committee at thfc homeof Mrs. George M. Bodman, general• chairman, on Naveaink River road,Middletown township. With an ad-ditional |2,500 still outstanding fromseveral districts and special gifts,the amount on hand at the cam-paign offices was announced as ?71,-268.20. The campaign goal was J7Q,-
000,
and with tho small' amount rtlUoutstanding,' committee members ex-pect the total to reach $78,000. , i
Mrs,
Bodman, who accopted tl)echairmanship of this year's ccaia-palgn to replaco her husband, who
ie
serving overseas with the BedCross, commended every campaignworker and expressed appreciationfor their "untiring efforts In behalfof thoso county residents who mustcome to Monmouth Memorial hos-pital and, being unablo to pay, mustbo financed by public-spirited' citi-zens %uoh as you and all of ourcontributors are."Outstanding in the campaign, shepointed out, was the fact that 20 outo! the 36 districts reached theirquota and wont over tho top. Ofthese, Oceanport, under tho chair-manship of Mrs. A. Barton Cross, iscredited with securing a donationfrom every resident of the borough,four districts In the county, becauseof their distance.from'the hospital,wero not given quotas, but, fromeach—Brlelle, Manasquan, Walltownship and South Belmar—con-tributions were received. :* Mlddletown township was dividedJnto eight districts and given a com-"binod quota of $12,400, Their finalreport, with additional money still- - anticipated, amounted.. to $13,137.Outstanding In the township., was' the record made by 'the Middletownvillage committee under tho ohalr-manshlp of Mrs. Samuel Biker, Jr.,Where the quota was $1,000 and the—amount turnod In was:$4,411.In addition to Oceanport and Mld-dletown township, the other districtswhich exceeded their quotai' includ-ed Asbury Park, Deal, Elberon andWest End, West Long Branch, Mon-mouth
Beach, Shrewsbury/ SetfBright, Koansburg, Holmdel town-ship, Marlboro, Howell township andFarmlngdalo, Freehold and Atlantictownship. The campaign in Brad-ley Beach and Jersey Homesteads,both areas which are expected tosurpass their goals, close Septem-ber 10. ' '
r-."
- Those invited to the victory tea' at
Mrs.
Bodman's home were J. LewieHay, Charles R. Beattie, BertramH. Borden, Mrs. Alvln E. Coleman,Sidney C. Erlanger, Gardiner S.Harlng, Mrs. Amory L. Haskell, Mrs.J. Frcntlco Kellogg, Henry'fforrman,Manton B, Metcalf, Jr., Mrs. H. H.Neuborger, David A. Schpl.te, Ber-nard A. Selple, Mrs. Andrew V.Stout,. Mrs., Lewia S, Thompson,Loula B. Tim, L. H. Burnett, Ed-mund A. Stanley, Oliver H. Brown,
2d,
A, Cheater Conrow.Carl Schroeder, Mrs, Qeorge W.Frederick, Jr., Mrs, James Blair,Walter Fox, Mrs. Rose MeLsner, Mrs.Hazel E. Klnney, Samuel Metrger,
Jr.,
Harold Iseman, Edwin Bry, Mil-ton P. Cranmer, W. Stanley Bouse,Louis H. Farb, Judge Jacob Stcln-baoh, Mrs; Anna Tunis, Fredorlck
E..
Noavea, Harry D. Gray, Dr. Rob-ert F, Hunter, Mrs. A. Barton Cross,
Mrs.
Allan H. Church,' Mrs. TedLethbrldge.
Mrs,
H. B. Boland, Mrs. WilliamP. Thomann, Mrs, H. P, Schaeffer,
•4-
MR8.
QEORGE M. BODMAN
Mrs.
H. E. Werner, Fred B. Phlllpp,Fred C. England, .W. Raymond John-
son,
Mrs. Harry H. Button, Roas E.King, Mrs. Invln D. Campbell, Mrs.Joseph O. Irwln, Edgar V. Denise,
Mrs.
Henri Werlemann, DouglasCralk, Mrs. Eugene Gardella, Mrs.Samuel C. Corse, Arthur H.-Barnes,Theodore J, Labrccquo, Mrs. J. Mar-shall Bookor, Mrs. Samuel Biker, Jr.Albert Johnson, H. Copeland, Mrs.Fred Frelbott, Mrs. Fred
Ncff,
Wil-liam C, Johnson, J. Daniel Tullor,
Mrs.
Joseph G. Parr, John H, Mc-Donnell, Arthur C. Wefelmeyer,Harry P. Seamen, George A.' Dunn,Boyla K. Pattern, Mrs. David Bea-
man,
Mrs. Audrey Bishop, J. HaroldHendrlckson, B. Munn Craig, Theo-dore Smith, lira. Joseph Baior, Hon.Edward W.Currlo,_Robort.Dobbins.Charles T. McCue, Freeholder Ed-gar O. Murphy, Peter P. Runyon,
Mrs.
J. Hallam Conover, CliffordHance, Mrs. J. Lester Hann, JoeLevy, James A} McMahon, Mrs. Har-old_B._Millara, Everett A
c
Wc-olfen-
den,
MM. Allison Stern, V. A.Johns-
ton,^
TJieo B. Lewis and IrvingPlunglan. ' *The complete report of the cam-paign, according to districts, follows:•"Brlelle, no"qtlOta", J3i TMaHas^uan",no quota, $5; Soa Girt, quota $200,$100j; Spring ' Lake, $660, $819.50;Wall township, no quota, $20; SouthBelmar, no quota, $1; Belmar, $250,
$97;
Avon, $100, $44.80; -Ocean Grove,$260, $61; Asbury Park, $1,400, $1,-761.25;Oakhurst, $1,500, $1,425; Deal,Elberon, West End, $11,500, $14,469;Long. Branch, $6,000, $1,899; WestLong Branch, $480, $583.75; Ocean-port, $1BO, $227; Portaupeck, $150,$84.50;, Monmouth Beach, $200, $200;Eatontown, $900, $506; Shrewsbury,$1,050, $1,050; Rod Bank, $5,000,}3,280; Little Silver, $4,850, $3,347;Fair Haven, $700, $585; Rumson,$22,500, $21,129.60; Sea Bright, $150,$400.60, Highlands, $350, $224; At-lantic Highlands, $750, $240; Mld-dletown township, $12,400, $13,137;RivorBldo drive, $6,2B0, $5,560; Mld-dletown village, $1,900, $4,441; Nave-sink-Chapel Hill, $1,650, $1,817; Leo-nardo, $150, $24; Belford, $100, $24;Port Monmouth, $100, $85; East'Keansburg, $100, $71; Everett-LIn-croft, $1,050, $1,115; Holmdel town-ship,$500, $1,061.10; Keansburg, $500,$502.97; Rarltan • township, $100,
$68;
Union Beach, $250, $89; Keyport,$750, $380.75; Matawan, $500, $297.50;Marlboro, $2B0, $440; Howoll-Fnrm-Ingdalc, $160, $154.76; Freehold, $750,$1,024.85; Atlantic township, $500,?1,208.75, and Engllehtown, $100,$104.85.
2 Boros ApproveDrainage Project
Buena Vista Avenue-Job to Cost $6,000
The governing bodtea of FairHaven and Rumson at special meet-ing* over the week-end approvedplans and specifications for install-ing a storm sewer on. Buena Vistaavenue, dividing line between thetwo boroughs, to correct a seriousdrainage condition. Upon final ap-proval of plans by the State High-way Department, the municipal of-ficials will advertlaa for bids.State funds amounting to J6.000have been set aside for the Job. Eachmunicipality will contribute »300.The materials to be used are not onthe priority list. Catch-basins willbe entirely o( concrete. Easementshave been obtained from residentsin the River Oaks section throughwhose properties the pipe will belaid,Final details of tho project werediscussed at a conference over theweek-end between Mayor Edgar V.Denise of Fair Haven and MayorLouis M. Hague of Rumson.
"Bucky" JohnsonWith Seabees InWilliamsburg, Va.
Navesink Man FirstAssistant Fire ChiefOf Township Dep't
Donald D. Johnson of Lakewldeavenue, Naveslnk, first assistantchief of Middletown township firedepartment, left yesterday for theSeabee camp at Williamsburg, Vir-ginia.A farewell' family gathering washeld for "Bucky" at his home Fri-day evening. Present were Mr. and
Mrs.
Joseph E. Johnson, Mr. and
Mrs.
J. Otto Johnson, Mr. and Mrs.Neil E. Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Wal-ter - A. Johnson, _ Mrs Beatrice S.Hose, Sgt. Alfred Jervls, 'William andDavid Swan and Mr. and Mrs. Don-ald D. Johnson.One of four sons of Joseph E.Johnson of Naveslnk, treasurer ofMlddiotown^township,i Donald J.._been service ina.nag«r »t the Leon-ardo garage for the last seven years.He held a similar position at Den-der's garage, Atlantlo Highlands, for.11 years.Donald Johnson has been a mem-ber of Naveslnk Hook and Laddercompany for 16 years and served Inthat company at Naveslnk as fore-man and engineer. He Is a memberof the Monmouth County Flre^Chiefsassociation and a representative ofthe Monmouth .Counly..Flrem.en'a as-sociation from his company. "Bucky"Is also trustee of the Exempt; Fire-men's association . of Middletowntownship, a member of the Middle,town township defense council andNaveslnk Methodist, church.Two members of Naveslnk. fire-men's reserves, Harold E, Salengerand Richard E. DoVesty, also leftyesterday for service In the Navy.
Donner Farm-EstateSold To New York Man
Tho 121-acre farm-estate of Philip
C.
Donner in Holmdel township hasboon sold to William Blsch of theGrlscom-Russell company, Now Yorkcity. The sale was effected by PaulR. Stryker, Holmdol real estato andlnsuranco broker. Mr, Donner, whosewifo died several months ago, hatmoved to Summit. Ho Is head of theDonnor-Chapal corporation of* New-ark.The farm Is on both sides of Long-street rond, and adjoins to tho west,the farm of Mrs. Flora Holmes, Thefarmhouse, which is located on- aknoll, was oomplotoly roniodolort byMr, Donner and Is In excellent re-pair. Tho house contains a largo liv-ing room with flro place, aunroom,dining room, modorn kitchen, sixlargo bedrooms, three tiled bathsand two servants rooms and bath,It has a Bteam heating system,A two-car garage with a modernly-equipped apartment above, a largobasement barn equipped for cattle,enclosed tool shod, poultry
housff,
corn crib, open tool shod and one-car(raraga mnlis up the com'pllmont offarm buildings. Included In the salewas n rubber-tlrtd tractor, plow,disk, attached cultivator and mowor,station wniton and ltt-ton truclt,•Mr. and Mrs. Bison have nlrondytaken possession of tholr new farm,nnd plan to rnlso boot cattle. AboutOR ncres of tho fnrm nre In mixedhay and nlfnlfa, 12 acres ara in avoiinu hearing appto orohard, about"0 ncron-nro; In woodland,- and th»remainder Is'n meadow watered byn brook. Tliwe In nlso n small Inlioon (lie plnco.i This fnrm will tie renumbered byold-timers ns the Longstreet farm,having been In tht Longntrent fam-ily for; itvaral ganintloni.
Physician To MarkHis 78th Birthday
Dr. Franklin C. Woodruff of At-lantic HightlandB will colebrato his78th birthday next Monday, Septem-ber 6, and all friends are Invited tocall onytlmo that day between 3 and9 o'olock,Dr. Woodruff has neon a physicianIn tho bayBhoro borough 25 years.Ho and his wife colobrated theirROldon wedding annlvoraary In 1040.Ho was graduated from Now YorkHomoopnthlo Medical college andFlower hospital In 1887, and In 1037he received a gold diploma for 60years of aorvlco In the practlvo ofniedlelno,GAMI5 PAIITY TONIGHT.Monmouth Star council, Shopliordaof Bothlohom, will hold a gomo pattytonight In tho Clayton anil Magoo'shall on Broad strcot. dames willstart at B:30 o'clock.
FI'IKOB
will beawarded and refreshments served.Senior High School Students.The Red Bank, Sonlor High Schoolofllco will bo oport from 0 n, m. to3:10 p, m. Friday, September 3, nndTuosaay nnd Wednesday, Boptombor7 and 8 for registration of now stu-dents and ohocKlng of BCliodulon,H, 0, Blober, Prlnolpal.—Aqvertlaement^d
Christmas MailTo Those Overseas
Must be Shipped EarlyTo Insure Delivery
There Is an old adage, "a wordto the -wlso Is 'aufllolent,
1
!- Thls_iaapplicable just now to those whocontemplate forwarding Christmaspackages to their loved ones Berv-Ing overseas. The-postoftlco depart-ment has Bet October 15 as the deadlino for receiving such packages andthere will bo no partiality shownafter that date.The boys at the Red Bank post-office are eager to render assistancein getting those packages dispatch-ed early and the Register appealsIn behalf of these postal employeesthat those who contemplate sendingChristmas packages do so not laterthan September 15. This will Insureproper handling and avoid the lastminute rush, which might causo thopackage not to reach its destinationIn time to be received as a holidayrcmombranco,Tho packages must not exceedlive pounds In weight and must notexceed 36 Inches in width and girth.Thcso regulations are mndo by thopostofilco department' »o . that thapackages may bo handled expedl-tlously and also provldo for the pos-sibility of carrying a greaterquantity In the limited spacesaboard ships carrying mall.Persons sending such packagesshould not only conform to thowolght and slzo but also must havetho packages socuroly wrapped andtho address plainly wrllton thereon,as well as tho namo and address oftho sonder. Declaration forms maybe secured at the local pOBtofliceand thcRo ahould bo secured early.School tlcglstratfon Day.All pupils who plan to enter thonod Bank public schools for tho firsttlmo this fall (except thoso alreadyregistered and pupils entorlng thekindergarten) ara requested to reg-ister at tho olllco ot tho Suporlntend-, ont of Schools, Sonlor High School,
I
Harding road, Rod Bank, N. J.,Wednesday, Sejitombor 6th, betweentho hours of 0::30 a. m. and 12 o'clocknoon nnd from 1:30 to 4:30 p, m, Tobo admitted to tho kindergarten pu-pils must have attained the ago of 4
Red Cross To ResumeBraille Services
County Chapter To Open ClassesOctober 1—Mrs. Chesler Chairman
Go To ChurchServices OpenHere Sunday
Rev. F. A. DeMarisTo Preach at theMethodist Church
The Braille service of the CountyBed Cross ohapter has been rein-stated as a volunteer special serviceby vote of the chapter executivebpard. Mrs. Isidore Chester will suc-ceed Mrs. William S. Holmes of Free-hold, who resigned after servingmany years as chairman. It wasthrough the efforts of Mrs. Holmesthat the Braille service has con-tinued throughout tho war years asshe practically carried the programalone.-Although the county chapter hasnever ceased in Its work for theblind, the Braille service was tem-porarily discontinued December 31,
1942,
by national headquarters be-cause of the cost and more immedi-ate - demands on the organization.Chapters throughout the country arenow reorganizing this service with aview to supplying the needs of thewar wounded. This need was em-phasized by Miss Evelyn Tave, ablind student in whom the chapterhas long been Interested, who visited
tho.
Monmouth street offices the pastweek after completing a course atthe Seeing Eye Dogr school In Mor-ristown. Miss Tave told of five ser-vice men who had been in trainingwith her there."We hope to continue the splendidBraille service which the chapterhas given In tho past," Mrs, Ches-ler said, "and to live up to the praiseof Miss Alice Bohrback, director ofBraille of the Library of Congress,who said that the Monmouth coun-ty Braille books are considered
the
Window HIindpB.Wo .make «ny kind of a windowshado; specials on shades, loss roll-era. .10 nnd 32-lnoh Hollnnda, 49 conts.Dublex 00 cents; Pyroxolln ivnuliablen
$1,
Bring your rollers. National B &
10.
Frown
1
*, phono 2080.—Advertise-ment, . ••most perfectly bound in the country."Headquarters lor the aorvico willbe established at the West BergenPlace school in tied BanKNlW work,which includes transcription ofgrade one and a half and grade twoBraille, shellacking the pages, sew-ing them together in book form, andbinding them In covers, will beginsoon and classes In transcription willbe held after October 1. Fifteen vol-unteers who have formerly workedin Braille are registered for the classIn grade two, a form of Braille re-quiring 200 contractlona of commonwords to one symbol..Volunteers for grade one and ahalf requiring only 40 contractionswhich must be mastered before gradetwo Is attempted, are urged to callchapter headquarters, Red Bank 3443at 107 Monmouth street, to register.The transcription Is done on slatesand "writers," a machine similar toa typewriter but having only six keysfor the Braille six dot alphabet.Officers of the service are MissKatherlne Ivlns of Freehold, vicechaliman In charge of Instructionand also emergency proofreader;
Mrs.
Thomas B. Hasler of Little Sli-ver, vice chairmen In charge ot bind-ery sewing; Mrs. Martin Connelly ofPortaupec!:, Instruction of gradetwo Braille; Mrs. William T. Plumof Rumson, instructor of grade oneand a half Braille; and Mrs. PeterBentley of Red Bank, Instructor ofblndory.
MIBS
Joan VanTlne, ofRumson, will make the printed titleson the backs of the Braille books.
Closing Of Fowler'sMarket For Duration
Conditions Force Shut-Down OfOne Of Red Bank's Best StoresMolly PitcherSugar In Italy
A feeling of nostalgia cameover Pvt, Francis Little ofNewman Springs road recent-ly when he picked up a cuboof sugar In Italy, he wrote In aletter to his sister, Miss Doro-thy Little. On tho paper Inwhich the piece of sugar waswrapped was an advertisementof the Molly Pitcher hotel inRed Bank, stating that It was agood place to eat and sleep.
Rotariam Holding .Clambake Today
The annual clambake of the RedBank Rotary club will bo held todayat Martin McGulre'a grove on High-way 35, just north of Headden's Cor-ner. The bake open? formally at 3o'clock, while tho order to "come andget it" will be sounded about 6o'clock.Harry Isaacs received the weeklywar bond at the luncheon meetinglast Thursday. Letters were read byIsaacs from Capt. Mttury Schwartz,Rev. Kenneth R. Perliiclilef and Lt.Benjamin Parker. Capt. Schwartzwrote that ho recently gavo a talkon "The Automobile Industry inAmerica" before a Rotary club InIndia. Rev. Porlnchlef, who was at-tending tho Army chaplain school atCambridge, Massachusetts, haa beentransferred to Camp McCoy, Wlacln-
sln.
Lt. Parker la stationed at CampGordon Johnson, Florida, an am-phibious training center.,y*nr*.J
t
niOTPOctober lOlli,Bchoots open far tlio, now term Bop-tcmber Kith. Pupils of tho Senior nndJunior high school will report' at8:211 a. m. Pupils of all other schoolswill report at 8:45 n. m,
E.
C. aillnnd, Superintendent,—Advertisement.
Naval AviationCadet At Colgate
William E. Hoist, 19, son of Mrs.Garda Hoist of High street, RedBank, who Is a Naval Aviation cadet,Is attending Colgate university atHamilton, New York.Ho Is" a graduato ot Red Bankhigh school and beforo Joining thoNavy ho was employed at tho SignalCorps laboratories at Fort Mon-mouth.Anyono desiring to buy a homo ormako ropalrs can obtain a mortgagont a reduced rnto of intercut. Nopremiums. Can bo paid on monthlyInstallments over a period of yearstp suit ownor. In amounts of $1000to $8,000. Property located within aton-milo radius of Red Bank. WrltoMortgage, box 011, Rod Bank.—Ad-vertisement.Distinctive rollglous merchandise.Christian books, Blblos, mottoes.Sunshlno greeting cards for all oc-casions. Porma-plax. TriumphantQlft nnd Book Shop, 07 Navoslnkavenue, Highlands, N. J.Can What You Cnn.Wo still havo somo jars loft; jollyBlnaarB, wax, oxtrn lido, otc. Nn-tlqnal 5
&
10. Frown's, phono 2080.—Advertisement.Wo can placo iiny good mortgagoralso buy and soil mortgages. Intorcntrnto ns low n»
iVi%.
Boynlon &Boynton, B Drummond place, phonoRod Bank 052,—Advertisement.
i
"
1
""'"""""" ".r'ucT'oii. "
••"••*'"
1:
"™
:j
DellvorloB subjocl to governmentregulations. Ilnnco
&
Davis, phoneRod'fHank^
10H
Advertisement.Your nug»will ln«t longor If clonnod regularly,Loon's, phono 3300.—AdvortlscmmtAnnouncement of the closing ofFowler's market at 7 Broad streetfor the duration of the war was madethis week by Mrs. Edith I. Fowler,wife of Dr. Warren
D.
Fowler, whoInstituted the business at Red Bankin 1930.Existing conditions, according tothe announcement, make it "extreme-ly difficult to carry on in any sem-blance of thB way in. which we havebeen accustomed." Mrsi Fowler saysthat it Is hoped that when tho war isover to open a new and modernstore. The statement follows:I am taking this means of lettingyou know that Fowler's market isdiscontinuing business for the dur-ation. ,We have token this step onlyafter a great deal of thought and de-liberation. The existing conditionsmako lt extremely difficult to carryon in any semblance of tho way Inwhich we have been accustomed. Itis no easy matter, aftor 13 years ofassociation with so many of ourfriends and customers to suddenlybring It all to an abrupt end.When victory Is ours and our boyscome homo, especially those whohave contributed
BO
much to the suc-cess of Fowler's, we plan to open anew and modern store.We want to thank our manyfriends .and customers, who havebeen so kind and patient duringthese trying days and we want tothank the Red Bank Register for themany kind' tlilnga it has dono toboost us, especially during the darkdays of 1930 when We first, openedour storo at 3 Broad street,.where theColonial restaurant Is now locntcd.God hasten tho day when our boysaro home again and business can op-erate in a normal way.Tho Fowler market enjoyed aprosperous growth during the 13years of US existence, greatly due tofhe high business standards' prac-ticed by the proprietors. A fewyears after opening at 3 Broad streetIt was moved to more spacious quar-ters at 7 Broad street, and before thowar Dr. and Mrs. Fowlor had madeplans to provldo again for tho
evef-
incrensing patronngo of this high-type market.Dr. Fowler, who Is. a prominentchiropractor nnd former member oftlio faculty of tho Palmer School ofChrlcopracllcs' nt Davenport, Iown,maintains ofTlccs at 300 Broad street.Ho bfis long been recognized na alending practlonor in chiropracticcircles and hnd been instrumental indeveloping this profession to astandard that Is noteworthy.Rev. Dr. Furman A. DeMaris ofHaddonfleld, one of New Jersey'slutstandlng Methodist preachers, willdeliver the first
ot a
special series ofmessages Sunday at the Red BankMethodist church on the benefit ofchurch help and the value of tryingreligion as a guide and sure counselIn these times.Dr. DeMaris' messages are under-standable and effective. During Au-gust he preached to ever-Increasingcongregations at the Red Bankchurch.The Women's Society for ChristianService, which la responsible for thefirst "Go to Church" Sunday, is urg-ing a large attendance of both mem-bers and those with no church affili-ations. Mrs. H. S. Hlgglnson, presi-dent of the group, states that
,
the"Women will welcome thoso, attend-ing as they come to help rekindle InRed Bank a faith and rule for dallyIvlng which can be the only realfoundation for a rebuilding in thislahd and others' of a peaceful andspirit filled life."The committee working with Mrs.HIgginson Includes Mrs. VernonRose, MrB. Stanley I. Brown, Mrs,Frank Kuhl, Mrs. Roy Inscoe, Mrs.Frank W. Warner and Miss EdnaMapps.
Shrewsbury SchoolOpening Sept. 13
Registration of NewPupils September 10
Stephen W. FaryIn North Africa
Credits ScoutingFor Navy Rating
Stephen Warren Fary, son of Mr.and Mrs. Raymond Fary of Beachstreet, Sea Bright, is now in NorthAfrica. He is a seaman first-classin the Navy and has been overseasabout three months. His brother,Raymond, Jr., is In nrmy service.Shrewsbury public school will be-gin the 1943-1914 school year Mon-day, September 13, at 8:45 a. m.There will -be_ only one session theopening day, terminating at noon.The "fegulaf'two-sessioH schedule willbe followed thereafter.Parents whoso children will enrollin the Shrewsbury school for theflrat time should register with Fred
C.
England, principal, In the audl-toBum
:
FHdiy
;=
Scptomb61'-10;=bi!-tween 10 a. m. and noon. These chil-dren include reception grade pupilsand those transferring from other.schools.Parents of reception grade pupilsshould bring' with them the follow-ing information: a birth certificatewhich shows the child Is five years
old,
or will be that
ago on
or be-fore. October 6, 1043j a physician'scertificate which shows tho child hasbeen vaccinated against smallpoxsince September, 1840, and a ph.iclan'a certificate Indicating the childhas been Inoculated against dlpth-theria.Parents of all other pupils shouldpresent the following information:Past school records comprising re-port and transfer cards showinggrade classification of the child andphysician's certificates as mentionedabove.The teaching staff consists ofHisses Mario M. Hamm, FlorenceHackett, Helen C. Lang, Mrs. Doro-thy W.
PODIO
and Principal England.
Rumson Girl Engaged
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond McQIrr ofRumson announce tho engagementof their daughter, Miss Grace Mc-GIrr, to Harold Potorson, son of Mr.and Mrs, Harold Potorson of Belmar,formerly of Hod Bank.Miss McGIrr was grnduatcd fromRumsnn high school and Is now om-ployc(i by tho Signal Corps at FortMinimouth.Mr. Potorson attended tho AsburyPitrk high school and Is now em-ployed by tho Annapolis Yacht Yard,
Inc.,
Annapolis, Maryland.No (Into linn boon sot for tlio wed-ding.VcnMInn Illlnds,Wo nro rontly to tako caro of youwith fnat dollvoryj dainty
1%-ln.
slatIn Ivory with Ivory tnpo~tho flno«t, 1>r, O. Thntrr r
\u\H
rosnnioil tho prnptlcn nf veterin-ary mndlclnn. 'Temporary ofTlco. 02Mnpln nvonuct, Rod Dank, hhone 3030.—Advortlicniont,
Blood DonorDate Is Canceled
National Red Cross CanNot Send Mobile Unit
Mrs.
J. Marshall Booker, chairmanof the blood donor service of thecounty Red Cross, announced yester-day that she haB received, noticesfrom tho national Red Cross head-quarters that tho mobile unit of theNew York Rod Cross chapter blooddonor service will bo unablo to makoIts scheduled visit to Bed Banlt Fri-day, September 24. Notices ot thecancellations have been sent to- allthoso who havo registered to givetholr blood on that date at Bed
Bank
Mrs.
Booker said that tho princi-pal reason for the cancellation wasthat slnco tho schedule was arrangedso many moro blood donor servicecenters havo been opened that It IsImpossible for tho mobile unit to vitlEReel Bunk at tho scheduled time.Tho unit will make Its next visit toRed Bank November 10,Tho unit will bo at tho MatawanMethodist church October 10, High-lands Octobpr 22, Asbury i'ark No-vember 9," Rod Bank November 10nnd Long Branch November 23. fur-ther details on the mobib unit vljitto .tho above-montlonoj localitieswill bo announced.Tho following letter was receivedby Mrs. Bookor at thu county head-quarters yesterday from tho NewYork hcadquartorc' officials:My dear Mrs. Booker:National 'headquarters of tho BloodDonor Service has notlflod us thatthoy are unablo, to supply us thisyear with tho fourth mobile unitwhich wus to have none. Into oper-ation July 1, and was then post-ponod until Boptombor 15. (Jecaumtof thin cancellation it will bo nocen-Hiuy for us to eancol tho September24 date nualuncd to vcur chapter..
Juhidr Skippers WillReceive Awards Sunday
Supper, Entertainment To FollowPresentation At Monmouth B. C.
STEPHEN W. FARY ;Stephen was graduated from SeaBright school and Long Branchjunior high and attended Senior highschool.-
-
Ho was employed- by-JesseA. Howland and SonB, Inc., contrac-tors, Sea Bright, before enlisting inthe Navy.In letters written home to his par-ents and to Scoutmaster Cecil Lay-r6h7--St61>IioHr—a—'nombEr~of—Bright Boy Scout Troop 62, creditedtho training received as a Boy Scoutfor his progress and present ratlnin the U. S. Navy. 7 " "After the final Comet association'ace and tho annual Willis A. Clay-on trophy event Sunday, the seasonprizes will be awarded at the
MOD-
nouth Boat club to the winners ine various classes, including th«ub events which have been sailed>y Lightnings, Comets and Sneak-oxes Saturday afternoons; the Corn-association races Sunday morningsnd the Junior Skippers associationatches which have been held by the'omets and Sneakboxes Sunday af-irnoons.First, second and third prizes, willie awarded In the Junior Skippersvents, and will go to skippers ofTina, Mlnaro and Leisure, as setforth in a separates story. on theiports pages. The awards will botched plates of the respective boat*n color on plaques, Similar awardsill go to the owners of the Sneok-oxes finishing first;- second and thirdn season points. They are DickDavis'Tern II, Bill Moore's Frannd Richard Reeves Davis
1
NightHawk, and other prizes will be givento Barbara Sayre, whose Fopeye wasourth In point standing, and BillWhite, whose Scuffle was fifth.One prize will be awarded In theDmet association competition, whichwill likely go to Bob Boskey, whosoisure has a good lead in pointswith one more race to be sailed.Awards will also be made to theseason point winners In the Mon-mouth Boat club races which will beconcluded Saturday afternoon.At six o'clock Sunday evening asupper will be served in the club at•hlch at least 200 young skippers,parents, club members and guestsare expected. A program of enter-alnment will also be provided forthe evening. .
500 Expected AtField Day Sunday
Plans Completed forBig; Eatohtdwn Event
Final plans for the field d% spon-sored by Eatontown defense coun-cil, to bo held Sunday at CouncilmanFrederick B. Phillpp'a farm on Southstreet, have been complted. Mem-bers of tho various "defense units olthat borough and their families willbe invited guests and an attendanceof close to 500 Is expected.Due to the few entries made todate at the borough hall for the- var-ious events, the committee has decided to receive entries at the fieldbeginning at 9 a. m. Sunday. Thofirst event, potato race for men, willbe started soon after that time, andthe entire athletic program will berun off as promptly as time permits,mlts. 'Announcement of tho variousovonts will bo ftmdo by loud speakerat the field. Tho full program, aofirst published in last week's issueof The
Red
Bank Register, will becarried out. The baseball game,which will be tho closing feature ofthe afternoon, will bo played be-tween the police reserves and airraid wardens, and a battle royal Isassured.The slogan adopted for the day,applicable only to tho Eatontowncivilian defensq corps, is "Come One,Come All," and the committee earnestly requests a largo turn-out Inorder to mako tho all-day event acomplete
success.
Liuet. OlimteadHome On Leave
Flrsl Lt. George W. Olmstead oFort Knox, Kentucky, left Saturdayafter spending a ten-day leavo at hishomo on West Front street. Whllohome ho enjoyed
golf,
attended theNow York showing of "Oklahoma,'was a guest nt tho^Llons club'meeting nnd waa tho. honored gueat at idlnnor given by a .group of friendat tho Homestead Go):
&
Countrjclub, Spring Luke.This wns hl9 first visit homo In •months. Ho has been in 'tho Armjtwo nnd one-half years. Ho Is serving with an armored division.BOARD MK15TINU TOMOItltOWPaint Up Now.Special values In quality paints.Semi-gloss 00 conts quart; Koni-To.no?2,l)fl Kill Ion, varnish $1.08 gallon, rad-iator paints, eta, Wo can taka caroof your paint needs. National 5 & 10.Hcrplco'j for SArvlco.Typewriters, adding machines said,lnntril ami repaired. Comploto lineof atntlonory nnd olllco equipment.10A Monmouth street, phono 4B5.—Advertisement.Tho oxocutlvo bourd of tho HcdBnnk Woman's club will meet to-morrow morning at 0:4Q o'clock attho clubhouse, Mrs. Ilqbcrt H. Hog
eta
will preside,ltondmvous 01ft Simp.Wnr tlmou has Its compensationsIn haml-mado gifts, both bcautlfinnd useful. Many Interesting floloctlons with old "Impoitod" labels,good tlmo to shop with so manyweddings nhuad, and Christmas com-ing. Address 523 llnngo avonue, As-bury Park.—Advortlscmont.iTiumrtl\(tW,oHn«isyhii! ilxturiis: Liimllno chromo fixturo JJIW; dining room llxturo $;il)BMuoiMcnnt two-llKlit,
W
watt, J7.M|brasn wnll llxturo H.0B. National ft A
10.
I'rown'n, phono 2080.—Advertisement,
Some OfficialsToo Strict WithCar Headlights
Drey fuss Explains'Present Rules in .TheDimout Area
Municipal and civilian defense of-ficials were requested by LeonardDreyfusa, state civilian defense di-rector, today to refrain from adopt-ing or enforcing rules and regula-tions regarding the use of headlightsmoro
-
stringent. ..than -those promul-gated by the Army authorities. "He pointed out that the presentrules provide that the upper half ofthe lens must be blacked out andthe low or down beam headlightsused In the coastal dimout area, evenn those areas where lights are vls-ble from the sea. Parking llghUmust not be used, either for drivingunder ordinary circumstances or dur-ing blackouts.In some municipalities, he said, lthas been reported that motorists arerequired to black out more than theupper half of the headlight. Inothers, lt 'has been reported
1
that lo-cal officials wore requiring motoriststo operate their cars with only theparking.lights. Both of these re-quirements aro contrary to the rules,he said, and are also contrary to theaccepted standards of safety.Tho regulations were developed onthe basis of adequate technical testsby both the Army and civilian en-lneers, he said. Admitting that ad-ditional shielding of the headlightswould reduce sky-glow somewhat,''it would not reduce It In ratio bywhich the driving hazard would boIncreased," he said."Safety practices dictate thatheadlights not bo blacked out anymoro than that required in the pres-mt rules—In other words tho upperhalf blacked out meets with Armyand safety requirements," he de- .clared.He urged those local councils ormunicipalities that have adoptedmore etrlngont ruloa to rescindthem.Droyfuss also Issued a new warn-ing against tho continued use of blualights for b!acliouV~purposes, con-trary to the provisions ot tho Army'*rules and regulations.Ho pointed out that some personacontinue to use blue lights duringblackouts, believing that they cannot bo seen from tha air and' »ropermitted under both tho Army andstate rules.Recent tests of Illumination, h«said, conclusively demonstrated thatblue illumination Is moro easily (tanfrom the air and less helpful ta thaground activity than any other color,Dreyfuss explained that until »p«proved flltors for flashlights are avail-nblo u satisfactory «uhstltute may beprovided by covering tha flashlightlong with three thlcknesc« of new*-papor or with ono thlcknew of new*-pnpor nnd one thickness of rsd cello-phano. 'In warning ngalnnt th« u«e of bluolights during a blackout! Dreyfus*cited a roport that "blua light *ff«ot».tlio human eyo lOOO times aa muchnt night
aa
It does during the day,while red light affooti tho human «y#no moro nt night than during tn»day-tlmo, At low levels of Illumina-tion the human eye la janiltlva to.colored light In tho following
'
bluo (highest mmaltlvlty), grr«»n; ,whlto, yollow, oilman anil r«il.
-
nnd othora in thq civilian
(Ut*nn«-
protective tfervlceg should UM tht''Mtaistl lights a« Ilitlfl U pOMlbl* :durltiK blnckMlti and n«v«r point I*
'
upward.
 
Page
Two.RED
BANK
REGISTER,
SEPTEMBER
2.1943
Evening GroupPlans Garden Auction
A garden show and "Victory Gar-den auction" will be featured at Ineebenlng meeting of tha eveningsyoup of Bed Bank Woman'* clubMonday, September 20, at the clubltoiMe. Plans for the event and the'1HS-M program
vert,
discussed bytte executive board Monday.»The group voted to dispense withone meeting a month and devotethat time to making surgical dress-ings for the Red Bank branch ofihe Ked Crow- In «=» part It.hasBeen the custom to meet the firstand third Mondays of each month.In the future the first Monday willbe surgical dressing meeting and thethird Monday the regular businesssession. The first surgical dressingmeeting will be Monday, October 4.
:
Membera who have* canned fruit
TO
vegetables from their Victor}'gardens this summer have beenasked to contribute a can of thisproduce for the auction.STAMP CLUB TO MEET.Tho Monmouth County PhilatelicsoclBty will meet for its first cessionin September, tomorrow night at theRed Bank borough hall.Notices for the meeting weremailed from Matawan and bora arecent one-cent commemorative offamous authors' series.WAO To Wed Sergeant In Army.Mr. and Mrs. Theodore V«rvoortof Cliffwood Beach havo
a
announcedtho engagement of their daughter,Cpl. Tech. Alida E. Vervoort of theWomen's Army Corps, to Sgt. Valentine Chetea of Woodbrldge. Cpl.Vervoort received her basic trainingat Des Molnes, la., and is now sta-tioned at Grenter Field, Manchester,N. H. Sgt. Chetea was a formermember of the National Guard andis stationed in Alaska.
f-
BOYS' SHARK TIPS
Genuine GoodyearWelt ConstructionHusky leather soles'and innersoles•Sturdy Elk uppers
SMART CHILLIES
Genuine Goodyear WeltConstruction-
=
Sturdy leathersoles and nnersolesDurabje Elk uppers
SIZES 01 ta. 11!
$2.66
Sales
And
Rental
By A. E.
Dennett
A. E. Dennett, Highlands realtor,has sold,to Richard Corbitt, Newark-contractor, the large summer homeat Monmouth Hills owned by theShepherd estate."
t
Mr. and Mr*. Ernest Roy of High-lands have purchased through Mr.Dennett the property of Arthur OI-sen at 298 Navealnk avenue, in thatborough. A modern house,, steamheated, stands on the lot which hasa frontage of 75 feet on the avenueand is 100 feet in depth.Col. H. H. Rally of Fort Hancockhas rented through the same realtorDr. David R. Telson's attractivehouse at Naveslnk park.
Lt.JojinB.BoydWins His^Wirigs"
Had
Transferred FromSignal Corps
Second
U.
John B. Boyd, Jr., sonof Dr. John B. Boyd of Oakland andPearl street, Red Bank, received biswings upon graduation Monday fromtho Army Air school at Blythevllle,
^k
Liquid
Ignites,
Burning
Girl,
16
Daughter
of
PolicemanSheedy Recovering
Miss Helen Sheedy of Shrewsburyavenue, 16-year-old daughter of Po-liceman and Mrs. James B. Sheedy,was severely burned Saturday after-noon while attempting to make a fire'In a pot stove in the cellar of her,home. Presence of mind upon herjpart probably prevented the burnsfrom being even worse. '
;
Miss Sheedy went to the cellar toenliven the fire so as to make somehot water. In her hand she had ajlass containing a quantity of paintcleaner, which she thought to be ker-osena and into which she dipped sev-eral sticks of wood before puttingthem In the stove. One of the sticksignited before reaching the stove andenveloped her hair. Using her handsto beat out the flames, Miss Sheedydropped tho glass, and tho contentsalso ignited. Tho young woman man-aged to dart back from the biasingpile, thus preventing further damage.John DeFalco, proprietor of a ser-vice station across the street putout the flames with an extin-guisher. In the meantime the firedepartment had.^een called but theirservices were not required. Blacksmoke from the blazlnR llojuid filledthe rooms upstairs. Mils Sheedywas removed to Rivervlew hospitaland after being treated was takenhome. Although the burns were se-vere, it is not expected -that therewill be any scars.
•» 11
MaryJBpyle
To Wed
Army Instructor
Announcement has been made ofthe engagement of Miss Mary Ro-berta Boyle, daughter of Mr. and
LT.
JOHN B. BOYD, JR.
U.
Boyd, who was graduated fromofficers' candidate school at FortMonmouth in September of lastyear, transferred from the SignalCorps to the Air Corps and was as-signed to the Arkansas flying school.
He.
is how rated as pilot of a twin-engine bomber aircraft.Lt, Boyd, who was graduated fromBed Bank high school and PeddleInstitute at Higbstown, entered theArmy at Fort Monmouth February
14,
1941, and shortly after was'pro-moted to corporal. He then enteredOCS and' upon completion of thecourae received hla commission.
Urges
Approval
Of
Referendum
On Constitution
Association Says
Taxpayer*
HaveEverything
to
Gain
.Trenton, N: J.—The New JerseyTaxpayers association will urge ap-.,
.
TtraTOt~U£^«±rafeMttdunfeta^b*^ub~ner, to Pvt. William A. Bedford, son
m
|
tted
to
votera
ot
tho Novemberof Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Bedford
e
i
ect
|
on
u,^
year
to determineof Red Bank. No, date has been set j
w
i,etber the legislature shall bo dl-for the wedding. j
re
eted to submit a revised state con-
MIBS
Boyle is a graduate of the stltutlon for approval or rejection byHoly Cross business school at Harrl- I
 
h
6
people at the 1911 general elec-son and is employed in a war plant | tlon. This was announced today byin that area. Pvt. Bedford is a
I
waiter T. Margetta, president, report-graduate of Ked Bank high school, I
j
ng
-
the action taken by th» board ofand is an Instructor In airplane me- I directors of the association,ihanics at Gulfport Field, MlBslssip- I "Taxpayers of New Jersey willpi. Before entering the service he I have everything to gain and nothingwas employed by the Slgmund Eisnercompany.
oAnnouncement
>
Closes
It-is
with
a
deep feeling
of
regret, that
we
notify
our
verygood friends
and
customers that after thirteen years
of
business association,
we are
closing
our
Food MarketSaturday, September
4th.
t
We
want
to
thank
you, our
friends
and
customers,
for
being
so pa-
tient
and
considerate.
We do
appreciate
all you
have done
for us and
trulyhope that some
day we may
again pick
up
where
we
left
off.The
very strenuous conditions over which
we
have
no
control havecaused
us to
make this decision after nearly
a
year
of
deliberation.
AII
our
Merchandise, Fixtures
and
Equipment
is
offered (or sale
WE
WILL REMAIN OPEN UNTILEVERYTHING
IS
DISPOSED
OF
s
7
BROAD
STREET,
RED
BANK,
N.J.
to lose by voting "yes' on the Novem-ber
1
election referendum sines- thiswill open the way toward ultimaterevision' of tbo state's Constitution,Margetts said In making the an-nouncement. By voting "yea' now,citizens will not be bound by anyproposed revision the legislature maydecide to submit to the people, butwill have the final voice in ratifyingor rejecting the document presentedfor their approval or disapproval atthe 1944 election."On the other hand, the gatesmight be closed for years to come onimprovement of New Jersey's funda-mental law, should the. voters fall tovote 'yes' on the referendum this No-vember. Possible gains to taxpayersof the state through Constitutionalrevision would, In this event, bo lost"In addition to the improved oper-ations of the democratic processes ofgovernment and the civlo better-,merit that' could be made possiblethrough replacement of the state'spresent antiquated fundamental law,taxpayers have a dollars-and-centsInterest in securing a stronger andmore adequate state Constitutionwhich will meet the demands of gov-ernment and the people today."Among the long range objectivessought by the New Jersey Taxpay-ers association, as reflected' by ourConstitution and in our annual plat-
I
form, are several which could be ac-complished through a revision of the'state Constitution. Chief amongtheso ars:"Reorganization of the state gov-ernment to simplify, revise, eliminatennd consolidate state- departmentsalong the line of efficiency and econ-omy In order to eliminate the wasteand inefficiency resulting from thepresent complicated and unco-ordin-ated structure of the state govern-ment;"Revision and strengthening of theslate's fiscal methods to eliminatededicated funds (except debt serviceupon existing bond Issues), to pro-vide, for all appropriations of thestate government In a single appro-priations bill, and to restrict supple-mentary appropriations to those ap-proved by a two-thirds vote of th«membership of each house of the leg-islature, and"Reslricttone upon enactment ofmandatory 'spending" laws! thoselaws which are enacted by the statelegislature, Imposing spending re.fjulrements upon local governmentby determining the salaries, termsand tenure of office of public officersor omployncs In locnl government r«-Ktirdlons of locnl need or ability topay."
IS EPILEPSY INHERITED?WHAT CAUSES
IT?
A booklit containing tha opinion* of lam.
1
ous doctou ofi.lhli lnt«ctltln| wbJKt willbt ttnt met, wtillt tiny tut, to my nadir.writing to
\ht
educational DMilon, 531y
Worm Syrup
-
Joixa tr a
wormaburain
4-H
Club Exhibit
At
Tinton Falls
The members of tho Tinton Falls4-H club and the Weysldo 4-H clubcombined their efforts of exhibit theresults of their 4-H work for th«year Friday evening »t th« TintonFalls flrehouse. Bixty-one entrieswere brought In to make a verycreditable exhibit In view of the factthat this Is tht first year Uiat a localexhibit has baen held in this com-munity. Classes were aot-up for In-dividual entries of club members toco-lnolde with those that will be usedat all U local exhibits In Monmouthcounty this year, and Judging wasdone on the basis of excellent, verygood, good and fair. ,.
t
.$Results follow: Jumper dress, Lil-lian Morris, very good. Clothing rec-ord book and story, Lillian Morris,good. Three Jars of different veg-etables, Virginia Osborne and LillianMorris, each very good; MildredVoorhooi, good and Ruth and I*o-venla Latihaw, fair. Three jar* ofdifferent fruits; Mildred Voorhees,good; Lovenla' and Ruth Latsbaw,each fair. Two jars of the same veg-etable; Barbara Berger, and MildredVoorhees, each very good; LillianMorris and Joan Chapman, good.Two jars of tha same fruits; MildredVoorhees,
vny
good and Doris Chap-man, good. Canning record bookand story, Mildred Voorhees, excel-lent, Ruth and Lovenla Latshaw,Barbara Berger and Lillian Morris,all fair.Tlie agricultural classes for veg-etables; John Paul voorhees receivedvery good for squash with Ted Voor-hees receiving good. William Homloswas the principal exhibitor In veg-etables and his results follows: Cros-by beets, fair; Detroit beets, fair;bush lima beam, good; cabbage, fair;carrots, fair, peppers, good; smallsugar pumpkin, excellent; wintersquasb, very good; Marglobe toma-toes, good; Rutgers tomatoes, fair;any other variety of tomatoes, good;watermelon, good; muskmelon, fair.In the poultry class, Barbara Bergerreceived a very good award for atrio of .Buff Leghorns, Mildred Voor-hees received very good for browneggs, while Jean Osborne was award-ed very good for a pair of duoks. Inaddition to these awards, the follow-ing members will be awarded duringthe next few days for exhibit athome, In the following olasses: PetorWingerter, heifer
calf;
WilliamHomlcs, heifer calf and milk goat;Paul Voorhees and Ten Voorhees,swine; and Audrey Jursa, poultry. Anorganized club exhibit was set up bythe Tinton Falls 4-H club wlhch wasgiven an award ot good by thejudges.^-Several record books were ex-hibited which had not received arating by the time this article waswritten.The members of the Tinton Falls4-H dub were responsible for arrang-ing and decorating the building,4-H club was responsible for "receiv-ing entries and filling out tags andrecording judging results. An inter-esting program of which MildredVoorhees was chairman, was pre-sented in the evening, during whichtime the results of the judging wasexplained and achievement pins wereawarded to all members exhibitingcompleted record boohs. VirginiaOsborne and Barbara Berger pre-sented a demonstration on preparingJars,for canning and William Homicsrendered ~a~ melody of three armysongs on his accordion. The Exten-sion Agent, Miss Ella Donaldson endH. J. Stelle, discussed plans for send-ing *-H exhibit to the New Jerseystate fair September 11, then showedslide pictures of methods of storingvegetables for winter storage and themaking of sauerkraut. Several 4-Hclub songs were sung during the pro-gram. The members learned thewords of the songs from the filmstrip shown on the screen. Mrs. N.!. Osborne was the accompanist.
Former ProsecutorDies In Hospital
Jonas Tumen
Succumb*
After
An
Operation
Jonas Tumen, Asbury Park attor-ney and. former Monmouth countyproseoutor, who was removed aftera legislative- Inquiry into his admin-istration, died Monday In the Phila-delphia General hospital after anoperation. He was 53.
Price
And
RationingQuestions
&
Answers
(Questions are those most fre-quently asked this week of the Tren-on District Office of OPA. Answersare official OPA rulings as of August
30.
Readers may submit" question!for replies to Trenton District Office,
1
OPA, Trenton, N. J.)Q. How are ration point values de-termined?A. Point values are let in direct re-ation to the supply of an item ascompared with the demand for It-Point value Is reductd if an Itemdoes not sell on schedule and, viceversa. Increased If the Item movestoo fast.Q, Are stoves ratlonedTA. Yes, both cooking and heatingstoves are rationed, and certificatesof purchase must be obtained fromyour local War Price and Rationingboard.Q. Is the holder of an "A" gasolineration book entitled to tires?A. No, he must have either a "B"or a
"C"
ration.Q. What Is the procedure if I havelost War Ration Book Three?-A. Report the loss to your WarPrice and Rationing board whichwill advise you as to advertising forthe book's recovery.
'
Q. How do I apply for War RationBook Three for my new-born baby?A. Take the child's birth certificateto your local War Price and Ration-ing board and make application forthe book.Q. May a store refute to sell me anarticle just because it I* scarce?A. Yes. Any retailer may conservescarce merchandise for his regularcustomers, or refuse to sell for »nyother reason.Q. What Is the celling. price forshoe repairing?A, The colling price Is the highestprice chnrged far the same or simi-lar service by that shop duringMarch, 1D43.Q. What Is the celling prlca
tot
Icecream?
'
A, The merchant must not chargeany more for Ice ' cream' than thoamount lie charged In March, 1042,.Q. If my dealer In March, 1042,supplied two dippers of loa cratitn In
^oneTforVclifitiF'tnay'hrtlWwp''-
JONAS TUMENMr. Tumen became prosecutor sfMonmouth county in 1930, being ap-pointed by Morgan F. Larson, thengovernor. He was removed Decem-ber 28, 1034, by Supremo Court Jus-tice Joseph B. Perskie after an in-vestigation and report by a legisla-tive committee headed by Assembly-man W. Stanley Naughrlght,
,
Mr, Tumen waa born In Manahaw-
kln,
Ocean county, March SO, 1890.Ho was a member of the class of1B07 at Atlantic Highlands highschool and was graduated fromBucknell university in lull. He re-ceived the bachelor of laws degreeat New York law school in 1818, in
the'
meanwhile teaching echopl atUnion Beach, then part of Rarltantownship. He was admitted to theNew York bar in 1818, nnd the NewJersey barjn 1921, becoming a coun-selor December 9, 1924.He was associated with the lawfirm'of the late Vice Chancelor John
E.
Foster at Atlantic Highlands be-fore
beginning practice In AsburyPark. Besides being a counselor, Mr.Tumen was a supreme^coiirLj:Qjnkmlssloner and a special master Inchancery.He was a member of the Masonicorder at Atlantic Highlands and theBed Bank Elks lodge. He was also,a founding member of the Atlantic.BlgilfeMrfiCaDSffi-Sru^-anasTiimiilo'
r^io
Beth El of Asbury Park.He leaves his wife Moronce, threechildren, Ethel, Connie and Jonas,
Jr.;
two brothers, Louis of AsburyPark and David of Atlantic. High-lands, and a sister, Mrs. Hattle Van-Brunt of Matawan.The funeral will be held at twoo'clock this afternoon at. his latehome at JDeal, •
Little Silver GirlEngagement Told
Mr. and Mrs.' Fred Colmorgen ofWoodland avenue, Little Silver, haveannounced tho engagement of theirdaughter. Miss Thelma Doris Colmor-
gen,
to George S. Kinkade, Jr., sonof Mr. and Mrs. George S. Kinkadeof Oceanport. No date has been se-lected for the wedding.Miss Colmorgen graduated fromRed Bank high school, in 1940, andsince that time has been employedat the Merchants Trust company.Mr. Kinkade also graduated fromRed Bank high school in 1940, and Isemployed at the Merchants Trustcompany. He served in the Armyfor eight months and after receivinga medical discharge resumed his po-sition at tha bank.Shore Wedding. '•
.
Miss Helen J. Lyons, daughter ofMr. and Mrs. J. Joseph Lyons ofBradley Beach, and Aloyslus A, Mul-ligan, Jr., of Harrison wore marriedWednesday of last week In theChurch of the Ascension at BradleyBeach. Following the coremony areception was held at the bride'shome and the couple thon left for atrip to Lake George.
Condemn
Two
Houses
Qunn
2,
Aft
Fire Hazards
The Bumson mayor and pounclllost Thursday night took steps tors« two unoooupled boutta. on Firststreet which have been condemnedas lire hazards by the Sirs Inspector.One of the dwellings, tho formerDonahue property, now owned bythe borough, was ordered demolished.The other ii the Tierney property,and tils matter was referred to theborough attorney, Theodore l£ Par-sons, for investigation,
.
Mayor Louis M. Hague appointedQeorge H. Hallamn, PoitmasterJames Porter, Jr., Joseph H. Healyand Bernard V, Ryan on the Christ-mas gifts committee to send puck-ages to men and women from theborough who are in tho armed nr-vices. Mr. Hallanari la chairman.Former'Shore Man Lost In Action.Lt. Brian W. Flavallt, son of Mr,and Mrs. William Flavelle of WestCaiaweU, formerly of Asbury Park,has been reported .mining In aotlonin the Middle Bast area. He leaveia wife and a throe-months-old sonwhom ho had never seen. Both LtFlavelle'a parents are natives of thashore, his mother being the formerEdna Woolley, daughter of the lateDr. Stephen Woolley, pioneer AfburyPark druggist.
B,
w
f
Efe
Eu
B^
John
I.
Qulnn . Thoraii F. Donmaayinemt J, HiOaa BDMird M Lura
WHIUm
L
Hawaii.
Jr.
BriSt
ft£»"
Fanon*. Ufcrecqoa
«
Borfen,
OOUNMUUOBS AT LAW.
VfBtt,
St, IUd BttkThasaen D. i-arwni Mmund
i.
Qtnsosa, Toiodort J. UbrteaaaOitea tYOeaat '
T*OB«
j. Salt*Beaut B. JUUU WUllim B. Bitb. JrjL
.,.,••
«hnT. to
HOBBUPO
U
Korautl
Tat
B*KK
-•T«
'«•» Baratt.
Ttl
'
ak III*
 
DR. L. W.
CARLBON
SUBGEOti CHIBOPODISr, <FOOT
ArxBomTa
. Office Honm Dally ttlt a.o. t* liSO p.m.Br«nla»ii'T«tid»» aw] TuomUrFor appointment phone IMSISO BBOAP 81V PEP BANK, N., J.
DR.
MILDRED HULSART
aUBOBON OBntOPODIBT,Foot Orthopedic* — Electro-Tbenpr
Offiu Hours) Dally 8 «. m. ta 8 •, a.Enalai«| TuMoar
(
Ttuurtamr, 3atttr«*> .. plo»4 Wednee4»jr •' ,-. Fet eptMlatauai. ptwn« «X)S '
188
BBOAO
ST.. BKp
B*Ng,
N. *,
Bomp
OW tn«
Axis.
High
Price*
CAS
F©E
YOTJH
High
Price*
CAR
(BUICKS PREFERRED)
WIIX SEND BUYER AT ON0E OB DRIVE IN—. CALL OB WHITE
"
. L.
ZOBEL
Phone
954
Red Bank, N.
J.
Phone
90
Sen Bright, N.
J.
ow
fortunate
foods recommended
byour
Government
for war-
time nutrition should also
be
America's favorite treat
... ice
cream!
Breyert
lc«
Cream
h
high
in
energy
food
value.,
«
pure—wholesome—delkioutl
ICE CREAM
ICf CMAM CO.-o
DMIIMI
ef Natbml Daby rWutfi Cefperafhn
t>ly only on* dipper at the mm*price?A. No. Tlili is a violation andshould be reported to the local WarPries and Rationing store?Wlmt Is the celling; price for a T-bone steak, Crude AA In a Group 1•nd !< slore?A. SB cant* a gpound,
when
you
bank
by mail!
Simply,
mail
in
Youi» Deposit
-And
We'll Send
You a
Receipt!
Start Today
to
Bank
by
Mail!
a
1
Today when you're busier than ever
«t
your
vnr
job . . .
your essential civilian activity
... or
yourhousekeeping duties
...
you'll appreciate
the
convenience
of
24-hour banking service
t
Makeyour depoiit
at any
hour
of the day or
night
. . »
there'*
«
teller'* window
no
farther than
the
near*
eit
mailbox!
*
The
-Merchants ^Trust
Co.
OF RED
BANK,
N. J.
MEMBER VEDBBAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE OOBPOIUTIONMKMHRII OF FBDBIWIi RESB11VB BY8TEM
••'•!••$&
&
 
BED BANK REGISTER, SEPTEMBER 2,1943
Page Three.
Democratic Leaders Meet
In
Deal
Mayor Frank Hague
of
Jersey, City, told about
200
other labor, leadera
and
DemocratB
who
werehla gueata
at a
four-hour long party
»t th»
Deal Golf club
In
Deal,
N. J.,
that
thD
Democratic party
(a
looking
to
them
to
produce voteB
for the
Gubernatorial candidacy
of
Mayor Vincent
J.
Murphy
of
Newark.About Mayor Hauge
pictured with
a few of the
guests: (left
to
right) Hague; Mayor Murphy; WilliamH. Smathers, former
U. S.
Sonator,
N. X;
David
T.
Wilontz,
N. J.
attorney gcnoral; Louis Marclanto,president, State Department
of
Labor,
and
Carl Holderman, president, Labor League
of the
C.I.O.
Chamber BulletinOut For September
According
to
the
September
bul-
letin
of the Red
Bank CommunityChamber
of
Commerce,
25 new
resi-dents have moved Into
Bed
Bankand Immediate vicinity during
the
pant month.The Junior Chamber
of
Commercenow
has
COO
members, according
to
the bulletin. Harold
V. B.
VoorhU,secretary
of the
Chamber,
is
Jtill
in
quest-.of addr&sses
of
those
in ser-
vice
who
have
not
been sent
mem-
bership carda, bulletins
of the lam
and officers plus
the Red
Bank
pic-
ture foldero.
The
Chamber
is pre-
pared
to
send
out
another
500 lot If
the names
and
addresses
can be se-
cured.Other interesting paragraphs
la
the bulletin pertain
to
gasollt*
fig-
ures,covering
the
amount
of
gaso-line sold
In New
Jersey
and the
non-
taxable gallons used during
May;
the cigarette
.
campaign fund
of
Shrewsbury post,. American Legion,which during July spent $250
for
6,000 packs
of
cigarettes sent
to the
boys
at the
front,
and the
hospitalservice
of the Red
Crosa under
the
chairmanship
of
Monroe Eisner,*
as-
sisted
by J.
Allen Mohn
and
ThomasP. Eoremus.
Mrs.
Marie CoxA Surgical Patient
Mia. Marie
Cox,
secretary
of the
Monmouth. County Board
of
Real-tors,
who has her
real estate officeat Portaupock, entered
the
Belmarhospital Monday afternoon
aa a sur-
gical patient under
the
card
of Dr.
George Gardner.
Shower Given
For
Miss Mary Boyd
To
Wed
Staff
Sgt.
u
B.
R.
Hoover Sunday
j
Miss Mary Boyd
of
Mechanicstreet
was
tendered
a
shower lastSunday
at the
home
of her
aunt,
Mrs.
Jesse
S.
Lelghton,
Sr., of
Southstreet. Miss Boyd,
who
will
be mar-
ried Sunday
to
Staff
Sgt.
Bernard
R.
Hoover,
Is the
daughter
of Mr. and
Mrs.
Fred Boyd.Gifts
for the
prospective bride wereplaced beneath
a
yellow
and
greenumbrella.. Guests were
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Edgar
J.
Bacigalupi,
Mr" and Mrs.
Raymond Boyd,
Lt.
and. Mrs.
Mau-
rice Reid,
Mr. and Mrs.
Michael
H.
Daly,
Mr. and Mrs.
Reuben Daly,
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Stephen Shultz,
Mrs.
MaryShultz,
Mrs.
Clyde Caffyn,
Mrs.
FredBoyd,
Mrs.
Dorothy, Griffith, MissesDorothy Curtis, Hannah and'ClarissaBell, Jane Caffyn
and
Buth Boyd,Robert Daly, John Daly, ThomasSchultz, Walter
and
William Boyd,Jesse
S.
Lelghton,
Sr.,
Walter
F.
Boyd,
Lt.
Donald Hardwlck
and Ltl
Michael Burke.Tour needs
may be
apparel,
fur-
nishings, autos, electrical appliances,
etc.
Whatever they
are, buy and
save through
The
Register's want
ad
columns.—Advertisement.
tmUM
ytacfa
of
IWM
•rawn
WlnUr gratni
by*
pWlni
NEW
JERSEYCERTIFIED SEED
of lU
varkUcf r«cornm«nd«d
by
tin Enpulnwnt StUon.
CvtllttJ
wliut
w
barayproduce! twlc«
••
muchInd
per
crt
n
dots
Mil
-•nd
V/i
t!m<i more
than
ry«.
N.
i.
FIELD CROP IMPROVEMENT ASSOC.i* cocptr.n.n
»nl, NEW
JERSE/ COUNCIL
J.
OEPT.
of
AGRICUtTUHE
coeptuffi
WANTED
Assistant Manager
FOR -
SNYDER'S
Phone
183 Red
Bank32 Broad Street,
< Red
Bank,
N. J.
ASBURY PARK BUSINESS COLLEGE
EST.
1903
Fall Term Opens September
8th
SECRETARIAL, ACCOUNTANCY, CQMPTOMETERY. COURSESReview work
in
Stenography, Bookkeeping, Filing,Typewriting
INDIVIDUAL IN8TBUCTI0NSchool office open dally September
4th and
thereafter.ERNEST
L,
BEAN, Prin.IN NAVAL SERVICE.Fred Perrotti, proprietor
of tho
Village Taproom
on
State Highway34
at
Colt's Neck, will leave Saturdayfor service
in the U. S.
Navy.
Dur-
ing
his
absence
the
business will
bo
continued
by Mrs.
Pcrrottj.
SeabeesSeekRecruits Here
. Many
Men
EnlistIn Naval Battalion
The Navy's newest fighting
arm,
Jho Construction Battalions—Sea-bees—aro
now In
action
on allpBe
ary along with
a
brief history
of tho
natlyosiEnlisting September
8, 1942, ho
trained
at
Parrls Island, South Caro-lina;
New
River, North Carolina,»flnd Camp Elliott, California.
Ho
was graduated from
Ecd
Bank highschool
In 1042, and
later
wad cm-
ployed
at
Eisno.r clothing company.At school
he waa
prominent
in all
major sports;
- .
CHIEF WILLIAM WEITZELfronts,
and to
keep
up a
steadystream
of
seml-akllled
and
skilledconstruction
mon,
there
le an
urgontneed
for
more qualified
mon
botweentha ages
of 17 and
BO
Chief Machin-ist's Mate William Woltzel, directorof
the
Naval Recruiting office hereBald today.Chief Woitzel,
a
veteran Navyfighting
man who is
Boeing activeservice
in a
second World
war,
saidMotvnouth county
mon
have respond-ed splendidly
in
tho
past
few
months,and already many
men
from thisarea, Koyport, Freehold
and th«
jhoro section
of
-Anbury- Park, havebelsn rated petty officers, some
as
high
as
chief
In the
Fighting
Sea'
beea.Chief Woltzol,
who
is
roerultlng
di-
rector
for tho
Navy
In
Monmoutli,Mercer
and
part
of
Huntordon coun-ties,
has
soon aorvlco with
the.
Navyfor
30
years.
Ho
first enlisted
In
1007, retired
In 1928 and was
trans-ferred
to tho
Fleet roaervo.
He wot
back
at
work with
the
Navy,
the
day
after Pearl Harbor.A Jersey native—ho
waB
born
In
Newark—Chief Woltzel
has
highpralso
for tho
patriotic assistance
he
has
been
Rotting- from
the
newspa-pers
and
pooplo
of the
county.Men with construction experience,Chiof Woltzol reports,
are
Inter-viewed every Friday
In tho
AsburyPark postofllco, from
0:30 to'3 p. m,,
and overy Saturday
In tho
Rod
Bankpostofllco, Room
4,
from
10 a.m.- to
3
p .m.
Applicants
who are
accept-ed
at
either Asbury Park
or Red
Bank will
bo.
glvon train faro
to Now
York, wharo
the
final physical
Is
giv-
en.
Ratings
to tho
qualified volun-teers
aro
also glvon
In
Now
York.
Chief Weltzol,
who was
In
action
In
World
Wnr 1
aboard
tho USS
SouthCarolina, declared today
tho
FightingSeabees—directed
by tho
bureau
of
yards anff docks under Admiral
Bon
Morsell—aro rrioro than
a
vital partof
the
greatest Navy
lri tho
world."They
aro
doing
a
tremendous
Job
with
tho
Marines right where
the
fighting la
the
hoavlcat.
Tho
Soaboeaaim
to
build
an
American baso rightIn
the
heart
of
Tokyo,"
ho
said.
,
As specialists,
tho
Seabees
are
paidmore limn avorago neiimon.
At
pres-ent, tlirco-foiirHis
of
them
ara
pettyofflcors. They rocolve eight weeks
of
training
In
Indoctrination bofore
be-
Ing assigned
to
tholr tanks. Llljeother Navy sorvlcomtm, they receivefood, clothing
and
quartors from
tha
government,
got
allowances
for da-
pendents
and
have opportunities
for
promotion
In
rank
nnd ray.
Over-Bens scrvlcn brings
a 20
poij*ent
In-
. oionnaln buso
pay,
.,;..,, ,,,._,'
,...
"Tho bent
way to
dpscrllio
tho
Bon-
been," Chief Woltiol declares,
"Is by
Hiolr olngnn —'A tough
Job
la
onsy
for
Btmlinnn—an Imposniblo
job
tnkoa
a
llttlo longer'."
• ,
•—
m
i
m '
Wliou
you
want
to
realize cash
lor
•omothlng apoedlly
you can
count
on
Tho Ilurlslor want
ad
column*
to do
fcour •nilioE
or,
 you,-Aav.oxtlBiiiuwt,
Red Banker In SouthPacific Promoted
Pvt. Patsoy Ambrosia,
U. S. M. C,
21-year-old
son or
Mr.
and Mis.
JohnAmbrosia
oil 76
Wostslde avenue,wna recently promoted
to
privatefirst class,
He Is
stationed some-where
In the
South Pacific.Ambrosia,
who has
spent seven
of
his
ton
months
in thu
Marine Corpsoutside
of the
United States,
la a
graduate
of a
field' telephone school.He
Is on
duty with
a
communica-tions auction;—
•-
During off-duty (.hours
PFC Am-
brosia
has
learned "the local languageand even Bpenred
neh,
native stylo,In
tho
rolling surf
of tho
Pacific.
His
Interest
in the
island's language
has
reached
th?
point where
ho la now
lIfilVlSllihilll
J.
DE
SANTIS
Formerly employed
for 2y
3
years'
by
STEINBACH
-
KRESGE.CO.
in'
their tailoring department
has
opened
for
"business
atT ~"
--_-—.2 LINDEN PLACE,
RED
BANK
OFFICERS' UNIFORMS
AND
MEN'S CLOTHING
1'Erai-COr.A OOMl'ANY, t,ONO ISLAND CITY,
N. Y.
nOXXUSHi
XXXBWQIA
JIOXTWUO COMrANY, ABinjIlY TAKK,
N, J,
YOUNG AMERICA GOESSCHOOL
In Sturdy Togs
At
Real Savings From
SCHULTE-U
TOTS and TEENS
-WASHABLE SCHOOL
Flower prints, stripes, plaids, dots—indozens
of
adorable styles. Sizes
7 to 14.
Dainty lingerie trims, self belts, clever
but-
tons. Mother will want several
for
yourschool wardrobe.
. .
GIRLS' RAINCOATS
&
CAPES
Sizes
3 to 16.
Guard
<fl TQ
- their health
on
rainy. »days;
be
prepared.
I
..
NITED
SLOPPY
JOE
SWEATERS
Ideal
for
school;
ser-
viceable
and
practical.Maize, rose
and
blue.Sizes
10 to 16.
Sizes
4 to
8-
JT9c
GIRLS SKIRTS
Corduroys, plaids, solidnavy;
in
sizes
7 to 16.
Just right
for
school.
1
GIRLS'BLOUSES
Ideal
for
school;
in
sizes2
to 16.
White, withdainty contrasting trim.
79
ANKLETS
15
Fine quality mercerized cotton
and
cotton
^*
nnd rayon,
in
solid colors
and
stripes.
, (
BUSTER BROWN
ANKLETS
20
Fine Durene cotton
In all
colors, includ-ing white. Sizes
6 to 10H.
Cuffs tlmt
-
may
bo
worn
up or
down.
5-8 HOSE
25'
BoyH*
nnd
girls'
In
colorful NolldH
nnd
patterns.
A
popular school hose. Sizes
VA
to
B'A.
CAMPUS
SOCKS
Novelty stitch
In
bright colors; just
be-
low
the
knee length,
in
V/i
to 11.
BOYS'CREW
SOCKS
Blazer gtrlpes
nnd
solid colors. Sites
0J4
id
c
I
to
12.
BOYS'
5-8
GOLF
HOSE
29'
In
tan-
or
blue jacquard pnttarns, SIxel9
to It,
BOYS'WASH SUITS
Solid color
or
it
ripe
blouitf.
con trat tin
r
tlet. Short!
of
broad-cloth
or
corduroy;befU; ifzei
3 to S.
1.59
BASQUE SHIRTS
Greenn,
maroon
and
brown, with
con-
tmating
stripes; filzo2
to 0.
Long fllCGves,
39«
BOYS'SHORTS
Snnforltcd spun rayonlinil cotton; blues, tealand
tan..
Sizes
7 to 14.
69'
BOYS' LONGIES
&
KNICKERS
Novelty suiting
in
blues, browns
and
greens.Sizes
8 to 18.
Well tailored. Others
up to
$4.98.
198
LITTLE GENTS' 2-Piece SUITS
Navy, teal
and
brown; double-breaated; welltailored;
45%
wool. Sizes
8 to 16.
6.49
BOYS' SUITS
8
to 16.
Two-piece, hard-finish, single
and
double breasted styles. Navy
and
browns,with
pin
stripe.
12.95
BOYS' SHIRTS
Sizes
B to 14.
'Whitesand fancies,
In
lilues,Inns
ami
grwii; guiinui-tcod color last.
79
e
,
;i
.
(
,
BOYS' TIES
\>L '^Vl'i'\?"'\ Stripes
nnd
nlulds, four-
. ' ,-• *fc
|) ^^Hvilt? In-linmlsj «tyll llho
1 ||[
GIRLS' OXFORDS
1.97
Lothtr iol>. pl«y rubb.r ht«l,illlclitil vamp. 3I«««
B/j lo 3.
BOYS'OXFORDS
1.69
GKIIIU
Ho,
(••tlitr
lott,crvaMtl vamp)
11 o 3*
SCHULTE-UNITED
Red Bank's Moat Modern Thrift Dopartmcnt Store
82 BROAD STREET PHONE 99 RED
BANK,
N. J.
'
"Air
Conditioned
For
Your Shopping Comfort"
:
'
^gtMUjJj^^^^WjK^jpM-WgWHl-^^JJ^lflJ

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