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EMS Licensing

EMS Licensing

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Published by CSGovts
While states have had the authority to license emergency medical services personnel since the 1970s, the EMS industry has changed considerably in recent years. It is becoming increasingly more common for EMS emergency services personnel to cross state lines to provide services in non-declared states of emergency, meaning in some instances EMS professionals are practicing medicine without a license. While there have been limited efforts to address the problem—notably border states entering into memorandums of understanding to allow EMS personnel to work across state lines—a more permanent and wide-reaching solution has not been found. One possible way to solve this growing problem may be the formation of an interstate compact, which would allow member states to self-regulate the existing system for licensing EMS personnel.
While states have had the authority to license emergency medical services personnel since the 1970s, the EMS industry has changed considerably in recent years. It is becoming increasingly more common for EMS emergency services personnel to cross state lines to provide services in non-declared states of emergency, meaning in some instances EMS professionals are practicing medicine without a license. While there have been limited efforts to address the problem—notably border states entering into memorandums of understanding to allow EMS personnel to work across state lines—a more permanent and wide-reaching solution has not been found. One possible way to solve this growing problem may be the formation of an interstate compact, which would allow member states to self-regulate the existing system for licensing EMS personnel.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: CSGovts on Oct 05, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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EMS Licensing: An Interstate Problem
 S   0 
 The Council of State Governments
CAPITOL
rESEarch
interstate compacts
 ThE council of STaTE govErnmEnTS
States have had the authority to license emergencymedical services personnel since the 1970s. While thefederal government frequently provides resourcesand assistance to help states in developing licensingprotocols, licenses are issued based on individualstate practices and procedures, and requirementsvary among the states.The license issued to emergency services personnelby a state is based on a determination of the indi-vidual’s tness to practice; the individual must meetor exceed the minimum requirements established bythat state’s laws and regulations. These requirementsvary by state, but often include:Completing a state-approved or nationally ac-credited training program;Obtaining a passing score on a national certica-tion examination;Passing a criminal history background check;Being credentialed by a licensed ambulance ser-vice or other emergency agency; andHaving a medical director who is responsible forverifying the competency of the provider on aperiodic basis.The EMS industry has undergone much changesince the 1970s. It is becoming increasingly morecommon for EMS personnel to cross state lines toprovide services in non-declared states of emergency,such as:Local EMS agencies have specialized and evolvedwith regional, even multistate areas of response;Helicopter EMS agencies are becoming morecommon, frequently serving two or more statesfrom the same base; andFederal agencies often dispatch contractors fromone state to another to function as EMS person-nel in events such as wildres.This increased level of interstate movement andcooperation has placed a renewed emphasis on howEMS personnel are licensed to ensure that they arenot accused of practicing medicine in a state in whichthey are not technically licensed. As a result, there isan increasing need for a universal means of assuringa legal, accountable and geographically consistentmethod of licensing emergency services personnel.
A Potential Solution
While there have been limited efforts to addressthe problem—notably border states entering intomemorandums of understanding to allow EMS per-sonnel to work across state lines—a more permanentand wide-reaching solution has not been found. Onepossible way to solve this growing problem may bethe formation of an interstate compact, which wouldallow member states to self-regulate the existingsystem for licensing EMS personnel.Compacts, which are governed by the tenets of contract law, provide states an enforceable, sustain-able and durable tool capable of ensuring permanentchange without federal intervention. With more than215 interstate compacts in existence today and eachstate belonging to an average of 25 compacts, there isconsiderable legal and historical precedence for thedevelopment and use of the tool.Perhaps more importantly, several compacts thatdeal specically with licensing and emergency man-agement issues already exist. Compacts such as the

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