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The Commercial Dispatch eEdition 10-7-12

The Commercial Dispatch eEdition 10-7-12

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CDISPATCH.COM
E
STABLISHED
1879 | C
OLUMBUS
, M
ISSISSIPPI
S
UNDAY
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CTOBER
7, 2012
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ACK
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ELIVERY
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FIVE QUESTIONSINSIDEWEATHER
1
What Greek goddess is depicted inthe famous Winged Victory of Samothrace?
2
What world nation has three con-secutive dotted characters in itsname when written in mixed-case let-ters?
3
In what city did Rosa Parks refuseto move to the back of the bus?
4
In 1966, Johnny Cash brieflyshared a Nashville apartment withwhat other country legend?
5
What NFL quarterback shatteredRon Jaworski’s old record for mostconsecutive starts?
Answers, 6D
CALENDAR
 Today
I
Fall Tour of Homes:
Columbus’ Fall Tour of Homesconcludes today with a 2-5 p.m.tour featuring WaverleyPlantation Mansion andSummertime. The TennesseeWilliams Home will also be opento the public. Tickets are $18($15 for seniors/military; $10for students K-12) at theConvention and Visitors Bureau,117 ThirdSt. S., 800-920-3533.
Monday, Oct. 8
I
Macon reception:
The publicis invited to a free reception atthe Macon Welcome Center from4-6 p.m. opening an exhibit of paintings by Wanda Hunter. Theshow remains on display throughNov. 4.
Wednesday throughFriday, Oct. 10-12
I
“Antigone”:
TheatreMSUopens its 2012-13 season withthis Greek tragedy by Sophocles,at 7:30 p.m. in McComas Hall onthe Mississippi State campus.Dr. Donna Clevinger directs. Theproduction is part of theShackouls Honors College“Classical Week,” a celebrationof Greek, Roman and other cul-tures of the ancient world.Purchase tickets ($10) atcomm.msstate.edu/theatre/tick-ets/index.php or call 662-325-3320.
Katie Ross Miller 
First grade, Heritage 
LOCAL FOLKS
Katelyn Holliman
is a junior atNew Hope HIgh School and is cur-rently looking for a job.
High
66
Low 
45
Mostly sunny
Full forecast on page 2A
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133
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DISPATCH CUSTOMER SERVICE 328-2424 | NEWSROOM 328-2471
Classifieds
5D
Comics
Insert
Obits
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Opinions
6&7A
SEC
I
No.10 Florida stuns fourth-rankedLSU, 14-6.
I
South Carolina rolls to 35-7 easy vic-tory against Georgia.
MSU 27, KY 14
I
Russell throws two touch-down passes as the 20th-rankedBulldogs improve to 5-0.
Ole Miss 27, Texas A&M 30
I
Johnny Manziel threw for atouchdown and rushed for anotherto help the Aggies rally.
BYCARMEN K. SISSON
csisson@cdispatch.com
 After months of turmoil, theColumbus Country Club was qui-etly sold Friday morning at theUnited States Bankruptcy Court in Aberdeen, fetching $1.6 mil-lion.East Mississippi Community College, the sole bidder, will usethe property to expand its courseofferings and relocate programs,regaining much-needed space at its crowded Golden Triangle cam-pus. The Country Club has lan-guished in a state of financial tor-por since the economic downturn, which took a heavy toll on mem-bership, testified Kirk Hardy,president of the club’s board of directors.Between October 2008 and April 2010, membership droppedby nearly a third, failing to recov-er when the country began toemerge from the recession. Theclub filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy onMay 3, 2011.Friday’s sale will only satisfy debt to the first primary securedcreditor, a five-bank consortiumto which the Country Club owes$1.52 million. The remaining primarsecured creditors — CadenceBank and Columbus business-man David Shelton — will not berepaid. The country club owedCadence $212,762 and owedShelton $375,438.50.Shelton had attempted to pur-chase it for $1.3 million last October and again in April,intending to develop the backnine holes and lease the front nineholes and 20,000 square foot club-
Court approves EMCC’s purchase of Country Club
See
CLUB
 ,3A
Luisa Porter/ Dispatch Staff 
Barbara Davis feeds Sayvion Guy, 5, a chicken wing, while Santasia Oden, 8, right, laughs at the situation during the7th Avenue Heritage Festival on Saturday. Cool, rainy weather didn’t seem to deter the crowds who gathered for thecelebration.
BY MICAH GREEN
mgreen@cdispatch.com
Kamal Karriem was wearing theofficial shirt for the Seventh AvenueHeritage Festival on Saturday,the last day of the biggest free festival inMississippi. It read, “Commemorating30 Years…not just an event, but a tra-dition.”“Well actually,” Karriem said, “wereally just started continuing the tradi-tion 30 years ago.“What we aredoing has been doneherefor longer than that.”In a previous life, the area that isNorth Seventh Avenue and the sur-rounding blocks was the home of oneof the most prominent black entertain-ment and business districts in a staunchly segregated state. TheQueen City Hotel, located on Seventh Avenue, played host to the likes oB.B. King, Fats Domino, DukeEllington and Billie Holiday,afew from the long list of music royalty.Many of these entertainers had tocome to the area, not only to perform,
In good taste
DISPATCH STAFF REPORT 
Carmen Sisson has beenpromoted to news editor,Dispatch Managing Editor Slim Smith has announced.Sisson, 39, moves intoher new role after servingasTheDispatch’s educationeporter since joining thetaff in April 2011. The Mobile, Ala. native was a double-ajorat the University of Alabama, study-ng English and journalism.Prior to joining the Dispatch, Sissonasworked at the Mobile County News(reporter/photographer) and Northport azette(editor). She has also worked xtensively as a freelance correspondent ndphotographer for a number of newsedia outlets, including Christian Scienceonitor, TIME Magazine and Thessociated Press.In her new position, Sisson will serve in variety of roles, including editing, featureriting, photography and layout/design.“I’m happy to have Carmen move intohis role,” Smith said. “Carmen’s versatili- yisagreat asset for The Dispatch. Wehink she will flourish in this expandedole.”
Sisson namednewseditor
Sisson
BYSARAH FOWLER 
 fowler@cdispatch.com
 As the Columbus Municipal SchoolDistrict and Lowndes County SchoolDistrict move forward with teaching state-required sex education in the classrooms,educators, students and their parentshavevery different opinions on the effec-tiveness of the fledgling program.Ofthe39,825babies borninMississippi in 2011, a troubling 5,459 of those births were to teenage mothers.een motherhood is particular distressinginthe black community: Of the 1,726babies born to mothers between the ages
Will AbstinencePluscurb tidalwave of teenpregnancies?
BY MICAH GREEN
mgreen@cdispatch.com
STARKVILLE — If you want to know about hisresearch, Edward Swan, a computer scientist and pro-fessor at Mississippi State,first points to a piece of equipment.It is called a haploscope.It is an optical device whichthrough a series of angledlenses and mirrors, projectsaseparate image to eacheye.“It’s a standard instru-ment to study visual percep-tion,” Swan explains,
MSU team’s research focuses on ‘augmented’ reality
Micah Green/Dispatch Staff 
Gurjot Singh, Kenny Moser, professor Ed Swan, and Chunya Hua examine the haplo-scope, a device used to project ‘augmented images’ over ‘real’ materials.
New program implementedtofight ‘epidemic’
See
TEENS
 ,8A
Seventh Ave. Festival thriving at 30-year mark
See
 FESTIVAL
 ,5ASee
 REALITY 
 ,5A
 
Sunday 
SAY WHAT?
“Our defense made the stops they needed to. I guess I’m critical,but I think our defense played very, very well throughout thecourse of the game.”
MSU football coach Dan Mullen after his team’s victory againstthe University of Kentucky on Saturday.
Story, 1B.
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ISPATCH
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The CommercialDispatch (USPS 142-320)Published daily except Monday. Entered at the post office at Columbus, Mississippi.Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, MSPOSTMASTER, Send address changes to:The Commercial Dispatch, P.O. Box 511, Columbus, MS 39703Published by Commercial Dispatch Publishing Company Inc.,516 Main St., Columbus, MS 39703
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Five-Day forecast for the Golden Triangle
Almanac DataNational WeatherLake LevelsRiver StagesSun and MoonSolunar table
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
City Hi Lo W Hi Lo WCity Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Weather(W):
s
-sunny,
pc
-partly cloudy,
c
-cloudy,
i
-ice,
sh
-showers,
t
-thunderstorms,
r
-rain,
sf 
-snow flurries,
sn
-snow
Yesterday 7 a.m. 24-hr.Lake Capacity yest. change
 The solunar period scheduleallows planning daysso you will be shing in good territory or hunting in good cover during those times.
TemperaturePrecipitationTombigbee
Yesterday Flood 7 a.m. 24-hr.River stage yest. change
Columbus through 3 p.m. yesterday 
High/low ..................................... 64°/53°Normal high/low ......................... 80°/55°24hours through 3 p.m. yest. ........... TraceMonthto date ................................. 0.57"Normal month to date ...................... 0.77"Year to date .................................. 35.84"Normal year to date ....................... 42.49"
Today Monday
Atlanta6850pc6851sBoston5644r5843sChicago5436s6446sDallas5844pc7157sHonolulu8571sh8671shJacksonville8864pc8265tMemphis6247pc6748s
70°43°
Monday
Mostly sunny andnice
76°52°
Tuesday
Sunny and pleasant
79°53°
Wednesday
Partly sunny andpleasant
79°57°
Thursday
Partly sunny Aberdeen Dam188'163.07'+0.21'Stennis Dam166'136.89'+0.21'Bevill Dam136'136.38'+0.03'Amory20'11.39'-0.17'Bigbee14'4.17'-0.18'Columbus15'6.60'-0.48'Fulton20'7.58'-0.43'Tupelo21'0.70'-0.40'
FullOct. 29FirstOct. 21NewOct. 15LastOct. 8
Sunrise ..... 6:53 a.m.Sunset ...... 6:30 p.m.Moonrise . 11:51 p.m.Moonset .... 1:18 p.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by 
AccuWeather, Inc.
©2012
Major ..... 6:05 a.m.Minor ... 12:17 p.m.Major ..... 6:29 p.m.Minor ................. ----Major ..... 6:53 a.m.Minor ... 12:41 a.m.Major ..... 7:17 p.m.Minor ..... 1:05 p.m.
MondayTodayToday Monday
Nashville6141pc6540sOrlando8971t8972tPhiladelphia5242r6044sPhoenix9470s9469sRaleigh6144sh5741cSalt Lake City6138s6743sSeattle6844s6545s
64°44°
Today
Partly sunny 
SNAP JUDGMENT: ONLINE POLLDID YOU HEAR?
Home-made soup/stew (52) 47%Chili (43) 39%Roast with vegetables (3) 3%Casseroles (1) 1%Lasagna (6) 5%None of the above. (6) 5%
With temps in the 40s this weekend, what is yourfavorite cold weather food?Vote on today’s poll at cdispatch.com
BY NICOLE EVATT 
The Associated Press
NEWYORK aredevil stuntman Davidlaine lit up New York’sier 54 on Friday for his lat-sthighvoltage feat. The illusionist is sched-led to spend three daysndnights standing in theiddle of a million volts of lectric currents streamedby tesla coils. The stunt is called“Electrified: One Million Volts Always On.”“Electrified” also isbeing streamed on YouTube, thanks to com-puting company Intel. Viewing stations are locat-ed in London, Beijing, Tokyo and Sydney. Viewersat the stations are able tocontrol the coils.
Blainegoes for shock-factor with latest stunt
9thAnnualCaledoniaDay
9th Annual Caledonia Day
October19-20
October 19-20
Still time to reserve your vendor’s booth!Contact Town Hall at 356-4117.
Friday Night at 7:00
Big Ben Atkins &Midsouth Fireworks Showat Ola J. Pickett Park
 All Day Saturday
Arts & Crafts • 5K Run • Bow ShootLawnmower Race • Pet ParadeChildren’s Activities • Dice Run
Antique Cars & Tractors • Food Vendors
Live Music from Cash Box 2:00 p.m.
 
 F R E E
ASK RUFUS
O
ften what weconsider to beimportant really isn’t that significant, while at the same timeevents we overlook canbe of historic note. Anaviation milestone that occurred in 1919 wasconnected to our area,but today few peopleeven know about it or its local associations. It  was the first transconti-nental round-trip air-plane flight. January of 1919 found theGreat War ended and military bases across the U.S. in theprocess of being closed or down-sized. Such was the case at  Taliaferro Air Field near Ft. Worth, Texas. There, Maj. TheodoreMacauley,the field’scommander, found his duties lesspressing. That opened the door for him to pursue an aviationrecordofthe first airplane flight tomake a transcontinental roundtrip.Hedeparted Taliaferro Field in January1919, in a De HavilandDH-4 airplane fitted with an extra 57-gallon fuel tank. The airplane was powered by a Liberty engine,and flying with Macauley was not aco-pilot or an observer,butmechanic. He flew west toRockwell Field at San Diego,Calif. From there, he started hisreturn trip east. The flight east went relatively smooth until the airplane experi-enced battery trouble over Texas.Macauley landed at Hot Wells, Texas, to get a replace-ment battery and thenat Pecos, Texas, for a better battery. He left there and arrived inBaton Rouge on Jan.23. From there theflight proceeded to Americus, Ga. and Arcadia, Fla. InFlorida, engine troubleforced a landing in a swamp, resulting inthe airplane beingtransported to a Marinebase near Miami for repairs. After the repairs, Macauley resumedhis flight around Jan. 26, return-ing to the west. He again experi-enced problems and crash-landedin Georgia. After the Georgia incident, heprocured a new De Haviland andcontinued his flight. Near Montgomery, Ala., Macauley wasflying through a rain storm whenhis propeller was damaged. Hedetoured to the Army Air Service’s Payne Field at West Point. Payne Field had a propeller shop that could provide a replace-ment for the De Haviland’sdam-aged propeller. The De Haviland was fitted with a new propeller, but heavy rain caused the field’sgrass run- way to be too soft for airplanes totake off. Realizing that they wouldbe stranded for a few days, Maj.Macauley and his mechanic decid-ed to make the most of the delay. They took a train to spend a fedays in Memphis. Their return tothe field found the runway dry,allowing them to take off andcomplete their round trip to Ft. Worth.For such a significant event asthe first transcontinental roundtrip flight, I thought it would beinteresting to see what had beenreported in the West Point news-paper, which covered Payne Fieldnews. I reviewed the newspapersin Januaryand early Februaryfor accounts of the flight and foundthe following news from PayneField:In early January of 1919, West Point’s Episcopal Church of theIncarnation and its minister, Rev. J. W. Fulford, was operating a St. Andrews Club for servicemenabove the Star Theatre.On Jan. 17, it was reported that post commander Col. Heard wasbeing reassigned and Maj.Cousins was assuming commandof Payne Field. Therewas also big ball scheduled at the field for Saturday night.On Jan. 22, Unit B at PayneField had a dance.On Jan. 31, it was announcedthat Payne Field would be “demo-bilized.” A detachment of 12 offi-cers and 200 enlisted men wouldremain as the field was to be con- verted to a “permanent landing onaerial mail routes.”On Feb. 2, George Krutz, a vio-linist, played at the Khaki Club.It would seem that an impor-tant milestone in aviation history had occurred and no one evennoticed.
 Rufus Ward is a local historian. Email your questions about local historyto him at rufushistory@aol.com.
Dances, propellers and perceptions
Rufus Ward
Courtesy photo
A1918 postcard from Payne Field showing “Jenneys” “lined up ready for a flight."
Courtesy photo
A28-inch-long wooden propeller inscribed “Model prop for Liberty motors used in World War” and “Made inpropeller shop Payne Field Flying School West Point Miss.” In 1919, the propeller shop at Payne Field pro-vided a propeller for a De Haviland airplane with a Liberty motor or engine which was making the firsttranscontinental round trip flight.
 
All of your friends atMilitary Hardwarewould like to thank everyone in our com-munity for the won-derful turnout forthe Fish Fry Benefitfor our life long employee and friend, DonnellLloyd.The outpouring of Christian care andconcern was phenomenal!!! Thanks for eachperson who came out, stood in line, purchasedaplate, and made a monetary contribution forsuch a worthy cause. Please continue to keepDonnell in your thoughts and prayers. Many,many thanks!!!
 Military Hardware
 Animal Medical Center, P.A.
is pleased to announce the association of 
Dr. Alicia Anderson
(Formerly of Acres North Animal Hospital, San Antonio,Texas)
and
Dr. Clay Anderson
(Formerly of Alamo Feline Health Center, San Antonio,Texas).
Please join us in welcoming them to Columbusand to the Animal Medical Center team!
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2012
3A
MSUSPORTS BLOG
Visit The Dispatch MSU Sports Blog for breakingBulldog news:
www.cdispatch.com/msusports
ONLINE SUBSCRIPTIONS
For less than $1 per month, print subscribers can get unlimitedaccess to story comments, extra photos, newspaper archivesand much more with an online subscription. Nonsubscribers canpurchase online access for less than $8 per month.Goto
www.cdispatch.com/subscribe
BY JEFF AMY 
The Associated Press
 JACKSON Someday,ntergy Corp. may own power lants in Jackson, Miss., andalvern, Ark. But no one’s surehen, or even if, the New rleans-based utility will com-lete its $469 million purchase of  wo natural gas-fired plants fromGen Power Corp. That’s because the U.S. Justiceepartment may halt the deals.In 2010, the JusticeDepartment told Entergy it wasinvestigating whether the compa-ny had unfairly favored use of itsown power plants, controlledtransmission lines to strangleindependent power generators,and then swooped in to buy their modern plants on the cheap.Entergy found out about theinquiry as it was buying a Louisiana generator, the fifth in a series of purchases. Now antitrust approval to buy two more hasbeen delayed.“We don’t know really what’soing on at DOJ,” Entergy CEOayne Leonard told investors onn April 26 conference call.ntergy spokespersons said theituation is little changed sincehen. Justice Department officialsdidn’t respond to requests for comment.State regulators in Arkansasand Mississippi, as well as theFederal Energy Regulatory Commission, have approved thepurchases. Because closing wasdelayed past Aug. 1, Entergy owes an extra $5 million per plant to Houston-based KGen, raisingthe price from $459 million. Thedelay is not ideal for KGen, whichis losing money and plans to dis-solve once it sells its last twoplants. KGen could not bereached for comment. CEO Thomas White told investors inMay that KGen had provided allinformation requested by the Justice Department. A Mississippi residence using1,000 kilowatt hours per month would pay an additional $1.65 month to finance what’s called theHinds Energy Center, Entergy told regulators. In Arkansas, a 1,000 kilowatt-hours-per-monthresidence would pay $1.86 a month for the Hot Spring Energy Center. Most residents in thosestates use more than 1,000 kilo- watt hours per month, accordingto federal data.Independent generatorsswarmed into the South in the late1990s at the prospect of power deregulation. The idea was to tapnatural gas to make electricity,selling it to utilities or even end-users. But the collapse of EnronCorp. in 2001 led officials torethink ending traditional stateregulation of prices. Natural gasprices spiked for a time, then fellas electricity demand plummetedat the beginning of the recession.Some power plants in Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippiand Texas, the four states whereEntergy operates, were disman-tled. Others struggled to makedebt payments. With such distress, Entergmoved in, buying five plants built by independents and signing thedeal for two more from KGen.Critics say Entergy helped cre-ate the difficulties by manipulat-ing its transmission system tomake it hard for independents tosell power profitably, and by keep-ing Entergy’s expensive older plants running when it could havecontracted more cheaply withindependents.“Entergy just didn’t want any competition on the generationside,” said David Cruthirds, a  Texas lawyer. He formerly  worked for an independent gener-ator and now publishes a utility regulation newsletter. Cruthirdssaid independents faced highcosts to upgrade power linesneeded for profitable long-termcontracts and said Entergy resis-ted signing long-term deals withoutsiders.Eric Smith, associate director of Tulane University’s Energy Institute, said no one has ever proved Entergy has done any-thing wrong.“I think Entergy would sa they’re not in the business obuilding transmission lines for people they see as free riders,”Smith said.Entergy says it bears no legalfault for independent generators’bad business decisions.However, the company didstructure two purchases to avoidFERC scrutiny because it did not include power lines, though that loophole was closed by federallaw in 2005. Entergy agreed tobuy long-term power from a Louisiana refinery that claimed itspower was cheaper than that obtained in one of the purchases,settling a lawsuit.
AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis
This Oct. 3, 2012 photograph shows cooling towers at the KGenPower Corporation natural gas-fired plant in Jackson. The plantmay one day be owned by the New Orleans-based utility, Entergy Corporation, as part of larger purchase, if allowed by the U.S.Justice Department, which has reservations about the purposedpurchase.
Entergy power plant purchases stalled by inquiry 
Club
Continued from Page 1A
ouse to club shareholders.Hardy said Shelton’sffer was rejected becauset was not in the best inter-st of either party.Friday’s ruling is subject o a 14-day waiting periodefore the sale is finalized. Though the proceedingsere swift, almost clinical inheir formality, emotionsere high on both sides of he courtroom.
 A good businessecision’
EMCC President Dr.ick Young was brimmingith ideas for his new 18-ole, full-service facility. The college currently erves 5,000 students at twoain campuses, Scooba nd Mayhew, and four ranch campuses.But 4,000 of those stu-ents are at the Goldenriangle campus, and withnrollment increasing 212ercent between 1994 and000, the once-cozy campusas become overcrowded,tifling future progress. Young said the country lub was the perfect solu-ion, because it saved theost of building a new facili- y from the ground up, andaluable space will beegained when the culinary rts and hotel and restau-ant management programsmove to the country club in January. The two programsserve around 65 students.It will also allow EMCCto begin offering a turf man-agement program, as wellas space for the existinggolf team and a collegiatetennis program in thefuture.“It’s a good businessdecision that frees up somespace,” Young said. “This will relieve a little bit of thestress for the time being.” Though the name of thecountry club will change,many of its services will not, Young said. Instead, hebelieves the college will beable to offer even more tothe community.Civic organizations, likethe Columbus Rotary andExchange clubs, will still beable to hold meetings at theclubhouse, and the facilities will still be available for  weddings and social func-tions, with one caveat —though alcohol will be per-mitted, the college is pro-hibited by law from servingor selling it.EMCC will also beginhosting leadership and cor-porate management train-ing onsite. Though Young is not yet sure how it will be imple-mented, he does intend tooffer memberships and pay-per-play for area golfers. The culinary arts andhotel and restaurant man-agement students will pro- vide food service. The campus extension isexpected to be self-support-ing.“Our plan is to get a lot going on,” Young said.
‘Rich tradition’
But for some, the sale was bittersweet. The club, which wasfounded in 1923, has beenthe center of many local res-idents’ cherished memo-ries, from summer after-noons on the green to wed-dings, dances and other special events.“In light of the circum-stances, this is a very goodopportunity to keep theproperty intact and stilloffer most of the services we were offering,” saidHardy, who has been a member since 1993 andboard president for the past three years. But when hethinks back to the time hehas spent there, he thinksof his children, swimmingat the pool when they were younger. Judge David Houston, who presided over the sale,said he was a caddie at thecountry club when he was12, long before golf carts were a ubiquitous part of club life.“The Columbus Country Club has had a long andrich tradition in this area,”Houston said at the conclu-sion of the sale. “I’m person-ally pleased that EMCC isgoing to acquire this facility. What they intend to do withit is a very useful purpose. It  will no longer be a country club, but perhaps it willserve a loftier purpose inthe Columbus community.”
 
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Do you have a favorite Halloween treator recipe you’d like to share?We’re dying to know.Boo us at jswoope@cdispatch.com,or call 662-328-2471.

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