Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Pedagogical Atmosphere

Pedagogical Atmosphere

Ratings: (0)|Views: 5 |Likes:
Published by Norm Friesen

More info:

Published by: Norm Friesen on Oct 08, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/08/2012

pdf

text

original

 
The
Pedagogical
Atmosphere
Otto
F.
Bolinow
University
of
Tubingen
Preliminary
Explorationof
the
Notionof
a
Pedagogical
AtmosphereThe
Fundamental
Prerequisitesfor
Bringing
up
Children
I
take
the
term
pedagogical
atmosphere
to
mean
all
those
fun
damental
emotional
conditions
and
sentient
human
qualities
that
exist
betweentheeducatorandthe
child
and
whichform
the
basis
foreverypedagogical
relationship.
The
term
is
per
haps
a
little
unfortunate,
and
I
use
it
hesitatingly
for
want
of
a
better
phrase.
The
term
atmosphere
usually
makes
one
think
of
fleetingand
delicate
air
hoveringover
the
solid
ground,
somewhat
like
a
shifting
breath
of
wind
or
aguileful
surfaceglare
whichcovers
and
distortsthe
true
relationships
under
neath.
When
one
talks
about
apedagogical
atmosphere,anemotionaland
sentimentalundertone
often
arises
which
threatens
to
cloak
all
educationalevents
in
a
fuzzy
sentimen
tality.
That
is
not
what
I
want
to
do
in
the
following
explora
tions.
I
want
to
be
careful
and
stay
clear
of
these
kinds
of
references
in
order
to
come
togrips
with
thefoundational
sig
nificance
andimportance
ofour
subject.
What
we
are
most
concernedwith
here
is
examininganddescribing
thoseaffectiveconditions
andqualities
which
arenecessary
for
the
raising
or
educating
ofchildren
to
be
possible
or
successful.
And
we
meanthis
to
be
taken
in
a
most
fun
damental
sense,for
we
do
not
merely
want
to
describe
those
prerequisites
which
fosterandenhancechildrearing,
or
alterna
tively
thoseconditions
which
create
difficulties
and
which
we
can
do
without;
rather,
we
mean
todescribe
the
conditions
which
must
be
supposed
to
exist
before
there
can
even
be
some
thing
like
childrearing
for
education
to
bepossible.
I
couldalso
have
decided
to
speak
simply
about
the
human
orbasic
assump
tions
of
childrearing
by
using
these
commonly
understood
terms
as
my
title,
wereit
not
that
these
termsare
all
too
unclear
andthereforenext
to
meaningless
for
the
uninitiated.
I
could
have
spokenabout
the
virtues
of
the
educatorand
presentedan
objective,
an
idealforusto
emulate.
But
by
this
objectification,
ourquest
could
be
misled
in
unintended
ways.
Phenomeno1o’
+
Pedago’
Volume
7
1989
5
 
Aswell,
it
would
present
us
with
too
broad
a
topic,
for
we
do
not
wishtodeal
withthe
entire
range
of
virtues
of
the
parent
or
educator.There
is
a
whole
array
of
such
virtueswhichshould
not
enter
our
discussion
because
they
point
in
a
different
direc
tion.Such
virtues
are
honesty,
impartiality,the
ability
to
separate
one’s
own
life
from
the
child’s,
thedemandsof
self-dis
cipline,
and
a
dedicated
dilligence,
as
well
as
manyothers.
These
arevirtues
which
the
pedagogue
must
utilize
if
he
or
she
is
to
fulfill
his
or
her
duties,
but
which
must
previously
have
been
actualized
in
the
pedagogue
and
which
thereforefirst
show
themselves
in
a
childrearingsituation.Here
we
are
concerned
only
withthose
virtues
which
are
pivotalfor
that
specifically
human
relationship
between
the
pedagogue
andthe
child,
that
is,
those
which
arise
in
the
orientation
of
one
person
to
another.
One
couldpossibly
speak
of
a
certain
educative
deportment
or
attitude
and
thus
suggest
that
there
is
a
certain
systematicapproach
which
lies
at
the
baseof
all
practical
activity.
It
is
out
of
a
specifically
oriented
fundamental
quality
of
the
emotions
that
the
giftor
talent
of
caring
for
another
springs,
and
inwhichit
mustremain
firmly
rooted.
To
this
belong
such
things
as
trust,
good
will,
patience,responsible
availability,
and
so
forth.
We
are
concerned
not
only
with
thevirtues
of
the
pedagogue
in
his
or
her
relationhip
with
the
child,
but
also
with
the
counter
part,
thevirtuesofthe
childinhis
or
her
relationshipwith
thecaring
adult:the
emotional,
human
qualities
to
which
the
child
must
be
able
to
respond
if
he
orshe
is
to
accomplish
the
various
tasks
associatedwithgrowing
up.
Inthis
respect,
too,
thereare
specificnecessary
prerequisites
for
educationandchildrearing.
These
are
trust
in
theteacher,
obligation
and
obedience,
love
and
honor,
andmanyothers
which
make
possible
not
only
the
ability
to
care
for
children,
but
also
thereadiness
of
the
childto
be
cared
for.
A
certain
affective
attitude
of
thecaringadulttherefore
cor
responds
toa
certain
emotional
state
of
the
child,
andbotharerequired
in
equal
measure
in
thebringing
up
ofchildren
for
education
to
be
successful
or
even
possible.
But
it
would
be
a
mistake
to
regard
bothof
these
as
distinct
and
separate,
as
if
we
could
exchange
onefor
theother.
Both
are
differentaspects
of
the
same
affectivemedium
which
encapsulatesboth
thecaringadult
andthe
child,
andwithin
which
the
twosides
aredistinct
onlyin
a
relative
sense.This
is
what
is
signified
by
the
conceptof
the
pedagogical
atmosphere.Here
we
are
concerned
with
the
total
pedagogical
situation
and
especially
with
the
child’s
and
the
pedagogue’scommon
overarchingharmonyand
dishar
mony
in
their
relationship
to
each
other.Using
a
deplorable
6
 
word
from
modern
psychology,
onecouldpossibly
speak
about
apedagogical
operational
climate,
or,
if
one
really
wanted
to
cloud
the
matter
by
usingburdened
significations,
onecould
speakabout
the
means
of
pedagogical
tools
or
about
effecting
more
harmony
between
people.
It
is
the
intent
of
this
present
undertaking
to
comprehendthose
essentialpreconditions
of
all
child-adultrelations
which
form
the
basis
that
makes
any
peda
gogical
relationship
possible,
and
to
highlightthose
moments
of
togetherness.
One
is
likely
reminded
of
the
thoughts
of
Nohi(1967)
who
spoke
of
the
pedagogical
relationand
of
Hertz
(1932)who
pursued
the
notion
in
his
work.
In
his
work,
too,
the
focus
was
on
the
overarching
adult-child
pedagogical
relation.But
this
concept
was
surprisingly
neither
pursued
nor
developed
thereafter,
and
so
the
ideaof
the
pedagogical
relation
remainednotably
pale
because
thesignificantelementscontained
therein
were
notexamined
further.It
seems
to
me
that
withinthe
concept
of
the
pedagogical
atmospherethere
is
hidden
a
foundational,
still
undifferentiated,buttherefore
all-encompassing
view
within
which
the
concretely
and
activelygrounded
pedagogical
relationcan
develop
itself.
The
Reasons
for
its
Neglect
It
is
amazing
that
the
problem
of
the
important
affective
pre
conditions
of
childrearing
has
so
rarely
been
considered
in
ped
agogical
thought.
The
reason
for
this
is
probably
the
difficulty
in
providing
a
sufficientlycomprehensive
account
of
one’s
ped
agogical
actions
in
bringing
up
children.
And
so
the
easiest
way
to
provide
such
anaccount
is
by
trying
to
understand
the
processof
childrearing
analogouslytomethodologies
and
tech
niques
of
production.
However,aslong
as
childrearing
was
seenas
atype
of
making
orproducing,
certain
kindsof
ques
tions
never
arose.The
existenceofaffectiveconditions
can
ap
peareither
as
advantages
or
disadvantages,
butfundamentallythe
planned
completionof
the
productive
results
of
education
is
notdependent
on
such
emotionalpreconditions.Evenwhen
I
am
in
abad
mood
I
can
accomplishmy
goal.
I
only
need
topull
myselftogether.
On
this
level,
the
pedagogical
atmosphere
wouldonly
be
a
peripheralandmost
doubtful
concern.Whoever
wants
to
arrive
successfully
at
his
goal
does
not
allow
himself
or
herself
tobe
bothered
by
this
matter.
The
existenceof
a
certainatmosphere
seems
onlyto
soften
the
seriousness,
to
surrender
to
the
merely
coincidental
mood.
Yetit
is
difficult
to
overestimate
the
historicalimportance
of
the
theory
of
childrearing
asadvocated
by
Rousseau.He
argued
7

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->