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Times Leader 10-08-2012

Times Leader 10-08-2012

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The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 10-08
The Wilkes-Barre Times Leader 10-08

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WILKES-BARRE, PA MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2012 50¢
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Candidates on campaign trailone month before election
NATION&WORLD,5A
Romney in Fla.,Obama in Calif.
Do The Ten Run, W-B Auction,Salvation Army flea market
CLICK,1C
Smile, you’re on the Click page
>>FROM1492 TO YOU:
Way back in the late 1400s,when Italian explorer Cristoforo Colombo was trying toget rich people to fund his voyages, he didn’t have muchluck. It wasn’t because people thought the Earth was flat.It was because they thought his trip would be too expen-sive, too far, and the tolls on the Jersey Turnpike toopricy. But then he went to Spain, where they called himCristóbal Colón, and he found his funding. The rest ishistory. Literally. Today, we call him Christopher Columbusand celebrate his accomplishments by giving kids andgovernment workers the day off.
>>THEY CALL HIM, TED:
For many of us, our bestfriend when we were little was our teddy bear. Unless wehad overactive imaginations and our best friends weregiant green and orange monsters named Flufflewumps.“Teddy Weddy” or “Fuzziebottom” or just plan “Bear” wasour constant childhood companion. Then we grew up andour constant companion became “Angry Birds” on our cellphones. This Tuesday, we can relive a bit of our past onNational Bring Your Teddy Bear to Work Day. That way,when your boss is yelling at you, you can snuggle with“Mr. Winkiewumpkins” and everything will be OK.
>>VICE IS NICE:
Presidential and vice presidentialdebates may be a necessary part of the electionprocess, but they can also be a bit scripted and pre-dictable. NOT when Joe Biden is involved. Some-where, network censors are undergoingrigorous training drills to be ready in casethe vice president lobs out a few colorfuladjectives. Or are they adverbs? Not tobe outdone, GOP VP candidate Paul Ryanmay just show up to debate shirtlessand intimidate Biden with his P90X“guns.” The vice presidential verbalskirmish begins at 9 p.m. Thursday.
>>PENNSYLVANIA PUCKS:
Saturday is Hockey Night inNEPA. The Penguins will begin the regular season 79miles up Interstate 81 in Binghamton. And here at home,the Mohegan Sun Arena will host the Penn State men’shockey team in its second ever Division I game. The Lionswill be taking on the American International College Yel-low Jackets at 7 p.m. Lets see if the Blue and White canfind success on the blue line like the school’shad on the goal line.
>>MICKEY MUSIC:
Disney movies have hadtheir share of memorable songs over theyears. There was “Circle of Life” from “TheLion King,” “When you Wish Upon a Star” from“Pinocchio.” “Kiss the Girl,” from “TheLittle Mermaid.And “Short People”from “Snow White and the SevenDwarves.” OK. That last one’s notreal. But the rest are, and theNortheastern Pa. Philharmonicwill be performing some of Dis-ney’s best this Saturday at 7p.m. The show’s at the F.M.Kirby Center.
5
THINGSYOUNEEDTOKNOWTHISWEEK
SPORTSSHOWCASE
NFL
STEELERS16EAGLES14GIANTS41BROWNS27PATRIOTS31BRONCOS21COLTS30PACKERS27FALCONS24REDSKINS17RAVENS9CHIEFS6VIKINGS30TITANS7DOLPHINS17BENGALS13
NL PLAYOFFS
NATIONALS3METS2
AL PLAYOFFS
TIGERS5ATHLETICS4
Results in state math andreading tests dropped in somany local schools this year thatthe number of them on an an-nual state “low-achieving” listcould climb from six to nine, a  Times Leader analysis shows. The “low-achieving schoolslist was mandated by Act 85 of 2012, the law that created thestate’s new Opportunity Scholar-ship Tax Credit program. Underthat program, businesses canearn tax credits for contribu-tions to scholarship funds de-signed to give students morechoice in the schools they at-tend.Any student living in the “at-tendance zone” of a low-achiev-ing school is eligible for thosescholarships, and the money canbe used to attend any public orprivate school that has appliedto the state to be part of theprogram. The state released the first listof low-achieving schools just weeks after Act 85 became lawJuly 2, in order to get the pro-gram rolling in time for thisschool year. Six Luzerne County schools made the list: GAR HighSchool and Heights-Murray,Dodson and Kistler elementary schools in Wilkes-Barre AreSchool District, and HazletonArea High School and Hazleton
LOW-ACHIEVING SCHOOLS
A Times Leader analysis of state test resultsshows more local schools are at risk oflanding on the state’s “low-achievingschools” list next year. Schools that haveclosed are not included
Wilkes-Barre Area
GAR High School Heights-MurrayHeights-Murray DodsonDodson KistlerKistler Flood
Hanover Area
Memorial
Hazleton Area
High School High SchoolHazleton El/Middle Hazleton El/MiddleHeights-TerraceWest Hazleton
On 2012 listAt risk of making2013 list
Mark Guydish/The Times Leader
List challenges area schools
Tests put more area schoolson “low-achieving” list.Program could trigger loss.
ByMARKGUYDISH
 mguydish@timesleader.com
SeeACHIEVING,Page8A
INSIDE
ANEWS:
Obituaries 2A, 6ALocal 3ANation & World 5AEditorials 7A
BSPORTS:
1BWeather 6B
CCLICK:
1CBirthdays 3CTelevision 4CCrossword/Horoscope 5C
DCLASSIFIED:
1DComics14D
 WEATHER
BriannaBrennanPartlysunnyandcool.High57,Low36.
Details, Page 6B
6
09815 10011
THE BEAT GOES ON AT WVIA 
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
 W 
VIA Executive Vice President Tom Curra and WVIA CEO Bill Kelly hold a reel of music that was one of the albumsin the Chiaroscuro record label collection. Last year, local businessman and benefactor Andrew Sordoni gave therecord company to the local PBS TV and NPR radio station. WVIA is now streaming this music 24/7 online and throughan HD radio station. It has also put out a catalog of more than 300 albums, which are available for purchase. Each al-bum is a reissue that has been carefully restored and digitized. For the story, see page 3A.
Attention, procrastinating Obama and Romney supporters: Tuesdayisthelastdaytoregisterto vote in the 2012 presidentialelection. Here’s what you needto know aboutthe voter regis-tration dead-line:Q. Whoneeds to regis-ter?
A.
Anyone who has never voted before orhaschangedhisor her name oraddress sincethey last votedneeds to regis-ter or updatetheir voter reg-istration, ac-cording to Mar-isa Crispell-Barber, con-tracted electionmanager for Luzerne County. Those who wish to changetheir political party affiliation al-so need to update their registra-tion to do so.Registration rolls are notpurged,soevenifyouhaven’tvot-edinyearsyoucanvotethiselec-tion provided your name or ad-dress has not changed.If you want to check your reg-
VotersfacingdeadlineTuesday
Last day to register to voteon Nov. 6 coming up fast.Presidential race tops ballot.
ByMATTHUGHES 
 mhughes@timesleader.com
SeeREGISTER,Page4A
 
2012
ELECTION
RomneyObama
HARRISBURG — Jerry Sand-usky will walk into state prison withlittlemorethanawatchand wedding band. He’ll be able to work a 30-hour week to make a few dollars. He’ll be able to watch Penn State football, butnot violent movies.IftheformerPennStatedefen-sive coach is sentenced Tuesday to a long state prison term, he will find himself far removedfrom the comfortable suburbanlifeheonceled,placedunderthemany rules and regulations of the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections.EvenSandusky’sownattornebelieves that whatever sentencehe gets, at age 68 Sandusky willlikely live out his days inside a state prison. Prison officials, written policies and former of-fenders provided a detailed lookto The Associated Press aboutthe regimented life behind barsthat Sandusky faces.Sandusky has been housed inisolationinsidetheCentreCoun-ty Correctional Facility in Belle-fontesincehisconvictioninJuneon 45 counts of child sexual
From sideline to cell: Sandusky’s future bleak
Former PSU coach may findhimself far removed fromsuburban life in state prison.
ByMARKSCOLFORO
 Associated Press
AP FILE PHOTO
FormerPennStateUniversityassistantfootballcoachJerrySandusky,center,leavestheCentreCountyCourthouseincusto-dyinJuneafterbeingfoundguiltyofmultiplechargesofchildsexualabuseinBellefonte.
SeeSANDUSKY,Page8A
 
PAGE 2A MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2012 THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com
Abelson,LyndsayAbromavage,DorothyFoster,GeorgeGreco,GenevieveGrescavage,TheresaKellmer,LeonKulick,JamesLewandowski,MargaretLyons,ElaineMcHugh,JohnMitchell,ScottPhillips,BernardJr.Seager,RonaldShales,EvelynStuttle,RichardTaylor,KristieWaskiewicz,Stanley
OBITUARIES
Page 2A, 6A
BUILDINGTRUST
The Times Leader strives tocorrect errors, clarify storiesand update them promptly.Corrections will appear in thisspot. If you have informationto help us correct an inaccu-racy or cover an issue morethoroughly, call the newsroomat 829-7242.
HARRISBURG – No playermatched all five winningnumbers drawn in Sunday’s“Pennsylvania Cash 5”game, so the jackpot will beworth $500,000.Lottery officials said 86players matched four num-bers and won $232.50 each;2,802 players matchedthree numbers and won $12each; and 34,387 playersmatched two numbers andwon $1each.
Wednesday’s Powerball jackpot will be worth at least$50 million because noplayer holds a ticket withone row that matches allfive winning numbers drawnin Saturday’s game.The numbers drawn were:
15-26-34-36-59
Powerball:
35
LOTTERY
MIDDAYDRAWING
DAILY NUMBER –
6-7-3
BIG 4 –
6-7-5-2
QUINTO –
6-6-2-5-0
TREASURE HUNT
17-18-22-27-29NIGHTLYDRAWING
DAILY NUMBER –
4-8-4
BIG 4 –
4-1-5-6
QUINTO –
0-8-9-5-8
CASH 5
04-13-28-30-40
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Delivery Monday–Sunday $3.60 per weekMailed Subscriptions Monday–Sunday$4.45 per week in PA$4.85 per week outside PAPublished daily by:Impressions Media15 N. Main St.Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711Periodicals postage paid atWilkes-Barre, PA and additional mailing officesPostmaster: Send address changesto Times Leader, 15 N. Main St.,Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
+(ISSN No. 0896-4084)USPS 499-710
Issue No. 2012-282
T
heresa E. Grescavage, 84, for-merly of Forty Fort, died Satur-day, October 6, 2012 in Elmcroft of Lebanon.After the death of her husband,Bolester (Lester) Grescavage, in2005, she resided with her daugh-ter,TheresainLebanon,andthenatElmcroft.ShewasborninKingston,daugh-ter of the late Alexander and Jose-phine Kratchman Stronoski. She was a 1945 graduate of KingstonHigh School, and was employed inthelocalgarmentindustrybyLaros’in Kingston. She was a member of the former St. Hedwig’s Church,Kingston.Besides her husband, Theresa  was preceded in death by her sis-ters, Veronica, Jean, Hedwig, Gene- vieve and Florence; and brothersAlexander, Edward and John.She is survived by her daughter, Theresa, wife of Ernest Gogets, Le-banon; brother Ralph Stronoski,Fairfax, Va.; nieces and nephews.
Funeral will
be Wednesday at 9a.m. from the Kopicki FuneralHome, 263 Zerbey Avenue, King-ston, with Mass of Christian Burialat 9:30 a.m. in St. Ignatius Church.Interment will be in Mount OlivetCemetery, Carverton.Friends may call Tuesday from 6to 8 p.m.
Theresa E. Grescavage
October 6, 2012
MoreObituaries,Page6A
D
orothy A. Abromavage passedaway into eternal peace on Wednesday, October 3, 2012.Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a daughter of the late Stanley andAnneBednarMartin.Alifelongresi-dent of East End section of Wilkes-Barre, she was educated in the Wilkes-Barre city schools and was a devoted member of Holy SaviourChurch, Wilkes-Barre. Prior to be-coming a mother and homemaker,she was employed by Bell Tele-phone Company and, before retir-ing, worked for Wilkes-Barre Area School District.Preceding her in death werebrothers Thomas (Pete) and Stan-ley (Stu) Martin, along with sisterJean Manley.Dorothy is survived by daugh-ters, Karen Webster, Mary EllenPerry, Melanie Abromavage; son,Robert, and his wife, Bonnie Abro-mavage; six grandchildren; twogreat-grandchildren; sister Mau-reenandherhusband,EdwardStan-ton; brother Robert and his wife,Gerri Martin.
Memorialservice
 willbeheldto-day from 6 to 8 p.m. from Mamary-Durkin Funeral Service, 59 ParrishSt., Wilkes-Barre. Those who desire may give me-morial contributions to the RonaldMcDonald House, 332 WheelerAve., Scranton, PA18510.
Dorothy A. Abromavage
October 3, 2012
Moving against bullying 
AIMEE DILGER PHOTOS/THE TIMES LEADER
 A 
bove, a few dozen people cross the Market StreetBridge into Wilkes-Barre on Sunday after listeningto a short talk on bullying at the Kirby Park pavil-ion. The anti-bullying walk was headed by Joelle Wrenand Patrick Rushton from the Victims Resource Center.Below, Rushton speaks to the group about bullying andhow we let bullying happen. He uses a shoe to call atten-tion to how we can better understand bullying by taking awalk in the bullied person’s shoes.
History honored in Pittston 
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
P
ittston City Councilman Danny Argo, left, reviewsthe history of the Christopher Columbus Statue indowntown Pittston at the annual Columbus Dayceremony on Sunday afternoon as Master of Ceremoniesattorney Michael Butera looks on.
HANOVERTWP.
– Policecharged Dennis Gliddon,19, of Oxford Street, with theft, receiv-ing stolen property, tampering  with evidence and obstructionSaturday after he allegedly tookan iPod Touch from a juvenileon West Division Street.Police said Gliddon was de-tained and taken to police head-quarters, where he allegedly tried to conceal the music play-er. A preliminary hearing hasbeen scheduled for Dec. 4 be-fore District Judge Joseph Hale-sey, Hanover Township.• Charles Molecavage saidsomeone tried to enter a resi-dence on David Road sometime Thursday or Friday, damaging a lock and leaving pry marksbehind. Police said no entry wasmade into the residence.• Anna Hammon said some-one entered her home on KnoxStreet and stole two handgunsand pieces of jewelry sometimebetween 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. Thursday. Police said the doorto the home was not locked andno signs of forced entry wereobserved. Investigation is con-tinuing, police said.
HANOVERTWP.
– Patricia Hicks of Nanticoke reportedSaturday her purse was stolen atthe Salvation Army store on theSans Souci Parkway. Hicks toldpolice she placed the pursedown while shopping around4:30 p.m., later realized whatshe did and discovered it wasgone. The purse contained cashand personal identificationcards.
HAZLETON
– Police Sunday issued a citation against Jose E.Colon, 40, of South LocustStreet after responding to report of drunken man causing a disturbance on South LocustStreet around 6:55 a.m. Colon was taken into custody, cited forpublic drunkenness and releasedto his family, police said.
WILKES-BARRE
– Police onSunday said citations were is-sued against Jesse Clougherafter they saw him throwing objects at pedestrians in thearea of131N. Main St. around1a.m.Clougher was intoxicated andunder the legal age to consumealcoholic beverages, police said.He was taken to police head-quarters and held until sober,police said.
WILKES-BARRE
– MichaelPersing of Sambourne Street was charged with assault Sun-day after he struck his motherin the face during a domesticdispute, police said.She suffered moderate injury in the assault that occurredaround1:45 a.m., police said.Persing was found hiding on a rear porch several houses away,police said. He was taken intocustody, held for arraignmentand later committed to thecounty prison for lack of $5,000bail, police said.
POLICE BLOTTER
 WAYNE,N.J.Fivepeopleincriticalconditionafteratourbusaccident in New Jersey were re-leased from the hospital andthree others were upgraded tofair condition, a hospital spokes- woman said Sunday.State police said 23 people were injured in Saturday morn-ing’s crash in Wayne, including twoyoungchildren.Aspokeswo-man at St. Joseph’s RegionalMedical Center declined to pro- videfurtherdetailsSundayaboutthe three patients in fair condi-tionorsaywhentheymightbere-leased.Authorities were still working Sunday to determine whatcaused the crash on an exit rampoff of eastbound Interstate 80. The driver, Neville Larmond,51, of Toronto, told authoritiesthat another driver cut him off. The bus slid down an embank-mentbeforecomingtorestonitsside. There were 57 passengersaboard the bus, which left from Toronto and was bound for NewYork City. Many of the passen-gersweremembersofaSeventh-dayAdventistchurchinToronto.
3 still in hospitalafter bus crashin New Jersey
The Associated Press
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Acommercial cargo ship rocketedintoorbitSundayinpursuitoftheInternational Space Station, thefirstofadozensupplyrunsundera mega-contract with NASA.It was the second launch of a Dragon capsule to the orbiting lab by the California-basedSpaceX company. The first waslast spring. This time was no test flight,however, and the spacecraft car-ried 1,000 pounds of key scienceexperiments and other preciousgear. There was also a personaltouch: chocolate-vanilla swirl icecream tucked in a freezer for thethree station residents. The company’s unmanned Fal-con rocket roared into the nightskyrightontime,puttingSpaceXon track to reach the space sta-tion Wednesday. The complex was soaring southwest of Tasma-nia when the Falcon took flight.Officials declared the launch a success.In more good news, a piece of space junk was no longer threat-ening the station, and NASAcould focus entirely on the deliv-ery mission.NASA is counting on privatebusinesstorestockthespacesta-tion, now that the shuttles haveretired to museums. The spaceagencyhasa$1.6billioncontract with SpaceX for12 resupply mis-sions.EspeciallyexcitingforNASAisthe fact that the Dragon will re-turn twice as much cargo as ittook up, including a stockpile of astronauts’ blood and urine sam-ples. The samples — nearly 500of them — have been stashed infreezers since Atlantis made thelast shuttle flight in July 2011.Space Exploration Technolo-gies Corp., or SpaceX — ownedby PayPal co-founder Elon Musk— is working to convert its un-manned Dragon capsules into vessels that could carry astro-nautstothespacestationinthree years. Other U.S. companies alsoare vying to carry crews. Ameri-cansmustrideRussianrocketstoorbitinthemeantime,forasteepprice.
Special delivery for station
Commercial Space X capsuleheads toward InternationalSpace Station with supplies.
ByMARCIADUNN 
 AP Aerospace Writer 
AP PHOTO
TheFalcon9SpaceXrocketliftsoffCapeCanaveral,Fla.onSun-day,carryingsuppliestotheInternationalSpaceStation.
 
THE TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2012 PAGE 3A
L
OCAL
timesleader.com
 WILKES-BARRE
Woman assaulted by man
A woman walking with her 7-year-old daughter in the 500 block of North Washington Street early Sunday morn-ing was assaulted by a man with a handgun, police said. The woman, who was not identified,said the man punched and choked her,and threw her to the ground around1:15 a.m., police said. She was treatedat Wilkes-Barre General Hospital formultiple injuries, police said.Police are investigating the assault.
AVOCA
Man arraigned on charges
A borough man was arraigned Thurs-day on multiple charges related to thealleged sexual assault of two teenagegirls.Police allege in court papers thatAnthony Veina, 23, of Main Street,assaulted a14-year-old girl and her12-year-old friend on July 31after they asked him to buy cigarettes for them.Police said they interviewed the girlsa few days after the alleged assault, andthe older girl said she called Veina, whom she met through a friend aboutthree months before and with whomshe was friends on Facebook, andasked him to get them cigarettes.Veina agreed, police said, and pickedup the girls in Pittston, drove them to a convenience store in Avoca, boughtcigarettes, drove them through an alley,stopped the car, pulled out a knife andtold them “not to tell anyone aboutthis” or he would kill them, police said.Veina then allegedly locked the girlsin the car, went into an apartment,returned a short time later, rolled a marijuana cigar in the car, drove thegirls toward Springbrook Township,smoked the cigar and forced the girlsto do the same by threatening them with the knife, police said.Veina them allegedly brought thegirls back to his apartment, sprayed“some sort of breath spray” that tastedlike peppermint and salt into theirmouths and forced them to perform a sexual act on him before dropping them off in Pittston.Veina was charged with one counteach of aggravated indecent assault onsomeone under age16, indecent as-sault on someone under16, indecentassault, and terroristic threats, andfour counts of corruption of minors. He was arraigned before District JudgeAndrew Barilla in Pittston and releasedafter posting $25,000 bail. A prelimina-ry hearing is set for1:45 p.m. Wednes-day before Barilla.
PITTSTON TWP.
Man faces theft charges
A Kingston man faces theft chargesafter allegedly stealing vehicle inspec-tion stickers in mid-shipment.State police at Wyoming said theirVehicle Fraud Unit was notified by thePennsylvania Department of Trans-portation that annual vehicle safety and emission stickers were being sto-len after shipment to an official in-spection station between January andMay.Police said an investigation revealedthat the inspection stickers were being stolen from the United Parcel Servicelocation at111Armstrong Road inPittston Township prior to being load-ed onto a delivery truck. PennDOT packaging was being opened, the stick-ers were removed and the packaging  was re-taped and delivered to the in-spection station, police said.Joel Fierman, 37, was charged withfive counts of theft by unlawful taking in the incident, police said.
SLATINGTON
Mom charged in son’s death
A 26-year-old Slatington woman saysshe was trying to unload a gun sheplanned to sell for $200 when the weapon fired, striking and killing her19-month-old son as he lay in a crib lateSaturday night, authorities said.Anthony F. Pallone Jr. was pro-nounced dead at12:47 a.m., LehighCounty Corner Scott Grim said.Grim ruled the boy’s death a hom-icide.Holly Pallone, the boy’s mother, wascharged with involuntary manslaughterand reckless endangerment.Pallone was arraigned Sunday morn-ing.Slatington police were called to theapartment at11:53 p.m. Saturday afterHolly Pallone called 911and said,“There was a gun and it went off and ithit my son in the forehead.”
The (Allentown) Morning Call
I N B R I E F
 WILKES-BARRE -- The words “fi-nalemente siamo arriviti,” Italian for“we’ve finally arrived,rolled off thetongue of attorney Joseph Giovannini,guest speaker Sunday at the Italian-American Association’s 35th AnnualColumbus Day Banquet at Genetti Ho-tel & Conference Center.Giovannini recalled the struggles of the early Italian immigrants and theadvances they’ve made in business,politics and sports.“Italians have come full circle sincethe early days and have taken pride intheir heritage,” he said. “In the past,they feared retribu-tion because they we-ren’t accepted.”Attorney GirardMecadon and CharlesA. Adonizio III aretwo local men who were honored at thebanquet for theirachievements. Meca-don, 47, who runs hisown law practice inPittston, and is an as-sistant public defend-er in Luzerne County, was chosen asthis year’s Person of the Year. He isinvolved in numerous community or-ganizations.Adonizio, 58, the owner/broker of Atlas Realty Inc. and Atlas InsuranceGroup, was presented with the Life-
Event celebrates Italian heritage
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE TIMES LEADER
Italian-American Association of Luzerne County Person of the Year attorneyGirard Mecadon, left, shares a laugh Sunday with Lifetime Achievement Awardrecipient Charles A. Adonizio III and their wives Karen Adonizio and ChristaMecadon at the Columbus Day Banquet at Genetti’s in Wilkes-Barre.
Attorney Girard Mecadon andCharles A. Adonizio III were honoredat the Columbus Day banquet.
ByCAMILLEFIOTI 
Times Leader Correspondent
See COLUMBUS, Page 4A
“I wasshockedthat I waschosen. Itis quite anhonor.”
Girard Mecadon
Chosen Personof The Year
Luzerne County’scentral court closedSept. 20 as part of the court system’sproposal to help whittle down thecounty’s projected$2.1 million year-enddeficit. The court system has promised$200,000 in savings before the end of the year, in addition to $150,000 inreductions from the central court clos-ing.Central court was housed in rentedspace in the Thomas C. Thomas build-ing in downtown Wilkes-Barre andcovered arraignments and preliminary hearings for Wilkes-Barre’s two magis-terial districts.Michael Shucosky, the county’s act-ing court administrator, said all cen-tral court cases have been completedor transferred back to their originat-ing magisterial districts.• The courts came up with a way to vacate central court without racking up a hefty moving tab, Shucosky said.A van was rented for $50, and pris-oners moved the equipment to magist-rates’ offices, he said.In exchange for their hard work,prisoners received pizza and wings.• Jim Torbik, the only full-time cen-tral court employee, was furlougheddue to the closure, records show. Torbik, who received $60,100 ascentral court administrator, was em-ployed as chief clerk when Tom Ma-kowski and Tom Pizano were commis-sioners in the early 2000s.• The county courthouse south en-trance is scheduled to reopen in com-ing days. The east River Street en-trance has been used in recent monthsas part of the ongoing courthouse res-toration project.• A new report prepared by county Information Technology DirectorSteve Englot is packed with statistics.Council Chairman Tim McGinley requested an update from Englot dur-ing Tuesday’s council meeting becausecouncil members have been askinquestions about the state of county technology.Englot’s report to council is postedunder Tuesday’s meeting attachmentson the council section of the county  website, www.luzernecounty.org.According to the report: The county spends about $682,400on phone service annually througheight providers.A consultant estimated the county could cut that annual bill in half by investing roughly $700,000 in a sys-tem that sends calls through the coun-ty computer network instead of a pub-lic telephone network. The county has about 1,300 desktopcomputers, 89 servers and 315 laptops.Englot has been studying options toimprove computerization, including servers, and an investment of $734,000 to $1 million will be neededover the next five years.Roughly $2 million from capitalbond borrowing in 2008 was set asideto cover information technology in-frastructure improvements.Jackson Township resident Ed
Creative cost saving is shown in central court closing
JENNIFERLEARN-ANDES
L U Z E R N E C O U N T Y B E A T
See COUNTY, Page 4A
 WILKES-BARRE -- On Sunday, 30teams traversed10 miles of track at Kir-by Park to show their strength and offertheir support in the inaugural Do the Ten run for cancer wellness sponsoredby the Center for Can-cer Wellness, Candy’sPlace, based in Forty Fort.Someteamsshowedtheir toughness withnames such as TheFighters, The Super-heroes, The WitchesCrew and the CancerBusters. Others chosenames like the CareBears, The Pink La-dies and The Candy Land Crew. Someteamsincluded10run-ners while others hadonly a few.All participants,though,sharedafiercedetermination to keepon going despite thechallenges they ortheir loved ones face due to cancer.Chris Fazzi, personal trainer forbreast cancer patients at Candy’s Placeand a member of the event committee,said she was very pleased with the par-ticipation on Sunday morning.“To get this many people together forour first time is a great accomplish-
Do the Tenteams godistance incancer fight
Run at Kirby Park supports the workof the Center for Cancer Wellness,Candy’s Place.
ByRALPHNARDONE 
Times Leader Correspondent
See TEN, Page 8A
“To getthis manypeople to-gether forour firsttime is agreat ac-complish-ment. Ireally wantto thankthem all.”
Chris Fazzi
Member of eventcommittee
JENKINSTWP.WVIAreceivedanunprecedentedgiftlastyearwhenlocalbusinessman and benefactor AndrewSordoni gave it the record company Chiaroscuro. WVIA CEO Bill Kelly and ExecutiveVice President Tom Curra are excitedabouttwowaysthecompanyhasbegunsharing the gift of the Chiaroscuro re-cordingswiththeworld.Chiaroscuro recorded outstanding  jazzmusiciansinthe1970sand1980s,period when these musicians were be-ing largely ignored by major recordcompanies. The label’s website, www.chiaroscurojazz.org, states thathalf of the musicians in the AmericanJazzHallofFamehavemaderecordingsforthecompany. WVIA is now streaming this music24/7 online and through an HD radiostation. It has also put out a catalog of morethan300albums,whichareavail-ableforpurchase.Eachalbumisareis-suethathasbeencarefullyrestoredanddigitized.“Westillhave20orsoanalogrecord-ingsnotreleasedonCD,”Currasaid. WVIAemployeeGeorgeGrahamisintheprocessofrestoringthosetapes.Grahamisknowntomanyinthearea asthehostof“MixedBag”andthecre-atoroftheconcertseries“HomegrownMusic.”Currasaidabout60percentofalbumsales are CDs that are being shippedaroundtheworld.“TheCDsareburnedhereandwrapped,andthenavolunteerships them to a distributor.” The com-panyhasadistributorforNorthAmer-ica,anddistributorsinSpain,PortugalandJapan. The other 40 percent of sales aredownloaded as MP3 files from the In-ternet.Kelly is excited about the new radiostation WVIA has created to introducethese recordings to music loversaroundtheworld. TheChiaroscuroChannelstreamsin-dividual tracks from the company’s al-bums online 365 days a year from its
Loving all that jazz
AIMEE DILGER/THE TIMES LEADER
WVIA Executive Vice President Tom Curra points out album covers from the Chiaroscuro record label that WVIAreceived as a gift a year ago.
 WVIA streaming music from collection 
BySUSANDENNEY 
Times Leader Correspondent
See JAZZ, Page 8A
Chiaroscuro’s website, www.chiaroscuro- jazz.org, suggests you say “key arrowskew row” to pronounce its unusualname. CDs and downloads of the label’s jazz recordings are available at thewebsite and from online retailers suchas iTunes and Amazon.
S AY I T, P L AY I T

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