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Then and Now: America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part VII

Then and Now: America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part VII

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The period of unprecedented expansion of immigrant-led entrepreneurship that characterized the 1980s and 1990s has come to a close. Today, the growth rate of immigrant-founded companies nationwide, at 24.3 percent, has plateaued. In the high-tech hub of Silicon Valley, the proportion of immigrant-founded companies has dropped from 52.4 percent during 1995–2005 to 43.9 percent during 2006–2012.

Immigrant founders of engineering and technology companies have employed roughly 560,000 workers and generated an estimated $63 billion dollars in sales during this time. While the rate of growth of immigrant entrepreneurship has stagnated, these numbers nonetheless underscore the continuing importance of high-skilled immigrants to the maintenance and expansion of the national economy. These findings are interestingly complex, since the two major skilled-immigrant groups—Indian and Chinese—are starting companies at higher rates than they did previously. Historically and today, the United States continues to benefit directly from the contributions of such immigrants. Far from expendable, high-skilled immigrants will remain a critical asset for maintaining U.S. competitiveness in the global economy.
The period of unprecedented expansion of immigrant-led entrepreneurship that characterized the 1980s and 1990s has come to a close. Today, the growth rate of immigrant-founded companies nationwide, at 24.3 percent, has plateaued. In the high-tech hub of Silicon Valley, the proportion of immigrant-founded companies has dropped from 52.4 percent during 1995–2005 to 43.9 percent during 2006–2012.

Immigrant founders of engineering and technology companies have employed roughly 560,000 workers and generated an estimated $63 billion dollars in sales during this time. While the rate of growth of immigrant entrepreneurship has stagnated, these numbers nonetheless underscore the continuing importance of high-skilled immigrants to the maintenance and expansion of the national economy. These findings are interestingly complex, since the two major skilled-immigrant groups—Indian and Chinese—are starting companies at higher rates than they did previously. Historically and today, the United States continues to benefit directly from the contributions of such immigrants. Far from expendable, high-skilled immigrants will remain a critical asset for maintaining U.S. competitiveness in the global economy.

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Published by: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation on Oct 10, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/09/2012

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October 2012
Then and Now:
America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs, Part VII
 Authors:
Vivek WadhwaAnnaLee SaxenianF. Daniel Siciliano
 
 America’s New Immigrant Entrepreneurs:
 
Then and Now
October 2012
 Authors Vivek Wadhwa AnnaLee SaxenianF. Daniel SicilianoResearchers
Neesha BapatSamantha HuangRandall JongRebecca KingSamantha McCannRachel PaulkHatim RahmanZahra Shakur JamalAswath Sridhar
 Part-time Researchers
Karen AttiahSean HassanCissie LamAnand Sundaram
©2012 by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. All rights reserved.
 
 AMERICAS NEW IMMIGRANT ENTREPRENEURS: THEN AND NOW
1
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Introduction and Overview ..............................................................................................................................................2Background on U.S. Immigration .....................................................................................................................................4Methodology—Immigrant Key Founder Data ...................................................................................................................6Data Analysis—Immigrant Key Founder Data ...................................................................................................................7Industry-Specific Immigrant Founder Data .....................................................................................................................16Special Analysis—Silicon Valley, Calif. ..........................................................................................................................25Summary of Results and Conclusion ..............................................................................................................................27Appendix: High-Technology Definition ..........................................................................................................................28

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