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SCORE PrizeGuide Maryville

SCORE PrizeGuide Maryville

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Published by TNSCORE

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Published by: TNSCORE on Oct 10, 2012
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Tb of CoTT
3 Letter from Jamie Woodson4 About the SCO prize6 2011 SCO prize District Winner: aryville City Schools18 Conclusion20 Aendix: Discussion Guide24 Glossary26 2011 SCO prize Selection Committee / Staff
September 2012
Dear Educators,Over the last three years, Tennessee has transormed into a national leader or education reorm.State and local leaders have come together to make a series o policy changes, including raising aca-demic standards or our students, providing educators with more timely access to data, and ocusing on our lowest achieving schools to ensure that more o our students graduate rom high school withthe skills they need to be successul in lie. Although we have made signicant strides in changing policy conditions, our most important work concerns how these policy changes impact what’s happening inclassrooms, schools, and districts throughout the state.Last year, SCORE awarded the rst annual SCORE Prize to the elementary, middle, and high school andone district in Tennessee that have most dramatically improved student achievement. While our aim inawarding the SCORE Prize was to identiy and reward those schools and districts that are eectively meet-ing the state’s new academic standards, an equally important goal o ours was to highlight best practicesand distill them into a usable ormat or educators. We began this work by sharing video vignettes and data proles o the nalists and winners ater last all’s announcement.
Pathways to the Prize 
continues our work o highlighting best practices and providing educators with the tools they need to replicate them in their owncommunities.In the ollowing pages, you will nd inormation about Maryville City Schools, our 2011 SCORE Prizedistrict winner, and its work to prepare all students or success ater high school. Maryville demands thatthe school district prepare students to be globally competitive. In response, the district engages the broadercommunity and uses data they have on student perormance to translate those high expectations into thedistrict’s mission, vision, and goals. In order to achieve its goals, everyone in Maryville – educators, par-ents, students, and business and community leaders – has a role to play.Maryville’s story is refective o the work that all o Tennessee’s districts must engage in to improveoutcomes or students. As Tennessee moves into the second year o wide-scale implementation o many o its policy commitments, we must ensure that educators have access to inormation aboutthose schools and districts that are rising to these new challenges. We hope that
Pathways to the Prize 
, which is grounded in research and supplemented by additional tools on our SCORE Prize website, aids you in continuing the most important work: ensuring that our students graduaterom high school prepared or the global economy.
 Very sincerely,
 
hroughout this document, thereare Q codes that directly linkto additional online resources.o access these resources,simly scan the code with yoursmarthone. Q code ascan be downloaded for free.You can also access theseresources by visitingthe link rovided.he SCO prize
Pathways to the Prize
 Lessons from the 2011 SCORE Prize District Winner
 
Pathways to the Prize
Lessons from the 2011 SCORE Prize District Winner
 
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The SCORE Prize annually awards $10,000 to theelementary, middle, and high school and $25,000to one district in Tennessee that have most dramati-cally improved student achievement. In awarding theSCORE Prize, SCORE aims to recognize those schoolsand districts that are doing the hard work o educationreorm, highlight and share their best practices, andshow other schools and districts throughout Tennesseethat improvement is possible. All public schools and districts are eligible or the SCOREPrize. In 2011, winners were chosen in a two-step process.For the rst phase, SCORE used a multi-staged criteria se-lection process to narrow the schools and districts down tonalists. This process ensured that schools and districts meta certain benchmark beore advancing to the next round.
The criteria that each school or district had to meetto advance are listed in order below:
Schools and districts must have an attendance rate of93 ercent or higher
he school or district must have a VAAS three-yeargrowth standard t-statistic of at least 1.5 in bothreading and math
emaining schools and districts were ranked by theirtwo-year change in CAp scores on reading and mathand their VAAS three-year growth standard
TVAAS was weighted three times heavier than TCAPin our selection process. This weighting was intendedto ensure that schools exhibiting high growth were alsoachieving at a high enough level to prepare students ornext steps. A series o complementary analyses were alsoconducted to provide schools and districts with a numbero “bonus points” that were used to supplement a school’sor district’s ranking.
These analyses included:
AC college readiness benchmark rates
Ap achievement data
Ap and I articiation rates
Cohort droout rates
College-going rates
VAAS scores for individual subjectsbeyond reading and math
Overall, the selection criteria were designed to identiy schools that have been able to meet and exceed the state’snew academic standards.The second phase o the selection process consisted o a series o site visits to document the policies and practicesthat have enabled schools and districts to make signicantgains in student achievement. SCORE produced a sitevisit protocol—aligned with our 2009
Roadmap to Success 
 report—that included a scoring rubric to ensure that allschools and districts were judged according to the samemeasures and criteria.For the 2011 SCORE Prize, initial analyses were con-ducted using 2008-2010 data. Data rom 2011 were in-corporated into the analyses on August 1, 2011, when thedata became available. Finalists were chosen in mid-Au-gust. Site visits were conducted in late August and early September.
Pathways to the Prize
 Lessons from the 2011 SCORE Prize District WinnerAbout the
SCORE
Prize
Pathways to the Prize
Lessons from the 2011 SCORE Prize District WinnerAbout the
SCORE
Prize
 
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