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Genet, Jean - The Thief's Journal

Genet, Jean - The Thief's Journal

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Published by Tanuj Solanki

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Published by: Tanuj Solanki on Oct 17, 2012
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01/23/2013

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The Thief's Journal
Jean Genet
 
Table of Contents
The Thief's Journal.............................................................................................................................................1
Jean Genet................................................................................................................................................1FOREWORD...........................................................................................................................................1The Thief's Journal...................................................................................................................................2
The Thief's Journali
 
The Thief's Journal
Jean Genet
This page copyright © 2004 Olympia Press.http://www.olympiapress.com
 Journal du Voleur 
was first published in 1949 in a privately printed edition of four hundred copies. A slightlymodified version was published in the same year by the Librairie Gallimard. The present translation followsthe original and only complete text, though it incorporates a few footnotes which the author added to the lateredition.Copyright1954
by B. Frechtman and The Olympia Press, Paris
FOREWORD
Not all who would be are Narcissus. Many who lean over the water see only a vague human figure. Genet seeshimself everywhere; the dullest surfaces reflect his image; even in others he perceives himself, therebybringing to light their deepest secrets. The disturbing theme of the double, the image, the counterpart, theenemy brother, is found in all his works.Each of them has the strange property of being both itself and the reflection of itself. Genet brings before us adense and teeming throng which intrigues us, transports us and changes into Genet beneath Genet's gaze.Hitler appears, talks, lives; he removes his mask: it was Genet. But the little servant−girl with the swollen feetwho meanwhile was burying her child — that was Genet too. InThe Thief's Journal
the myth of the double has assumed its most reassuring, most common, most 
natural
form. Here Genet speaks of Genet without intermediary. He talks of his life, of his wretchedness and glory, of hisloves; he tells the story of his thoughts. One might think that, like Montaigne, he is going to draw agood−humored and familiar self−portrait. But Genet is never familiar, even with himself. He does, to be sure,tell us everything. The whole truth, nothing but the truth, but is it the sacred truth. He opens up one of his
The Thief's Journal1

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