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10.17.12

10.17.12

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Published by The Crimson White
By Chandler Wright
Contributing Writer
Former U.S. Attorney General
Alberto Gonzales spoke at the
University of Alabama School
of Law last night and answered
tough questions about the pros-
ecution of former Alabama Gov.
Don Siegelman.
Gonzales spoke briefly to the
crowd and then opened up the
floor for questions from the audi-
ence. Joseph Siegelman, a third
year law student and the son of
the former governor, asked about
Gonzales’ knowledge
By Chandler Wright
Contributing Writer
Former U.S. Attorney General
Alberto Gonzales spoke at the
University of Alabama School
of Law last night and answered
tough questions about the pros-
ecution of former Alabama Gov.
Don Siegelman.
Gonzales spoke briefly to the
crowd and then opened up the
floor for questions from the audi-
ence. Joseph Siegelman, a third
year law student and the son of
the former governor, asked about
Gonzales’ knowledge

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Published by: The Crimson White on Oct 17, 2012
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By Chandler Wright 
Contributing Writer
Former U.S. Attorney GeneralAlberto Gonzales spoke at theUniversity of Alabama Schoolof Law last night and answeredtough questions about the pros-ecution of former Alabama Gov.Don Siegelman.Gonzales spoke briefly to thecrowd and then opened up thefloor for questions from the audi-ence. Joseph Siegelman, a thirdyear law student and the son of the former governor, asked aboutGonzales’ knowledge of inconsis-tencies that existed during hisfather’s trial.“I don’t interject myself intothose decisions,” Gonzalessaid. “That is the responsibil-ity of the Office of ProfessionalResponsibility. I don’t know theintricacies of this case, but I getasked questions like this a lot,and I always answer the same:No one lobbied me to move for-ward or stop with this investiga-tion.”Siegelman was convicted in2006 of seven charges of briberyand mail fraud in connection withRichard Scrushy, the founderand former CEO of HealthSouth.According to al.com, U.S.House Judiciary CommitteeChairman John Conyers of Michigan sent a letter toGonzales in July 2007 request-ing, “documents and informa-tion concerning the prosecutionof former Gov. Don Siegelman.”Gonzales resigned in September2007.“I felt compelled to askGonzales these questions,”Joseph Siegelman said. “I feelthe Alabama press has failed toreport on things that have beengoing on.”Siegelman was not the onlystudent who raised questionsabout his father’s case. A num-ber of other students also askedGonzales pointed questionsabout his knowledge of anywrongdoings in the case.“I was really honored to seeeverything that my classmatessaid, as well,” Siegelman said.“Many of them, because theyknow me, have shown an inter-est in the case, but I neverthought they’d be compelled toconfront the former AttorneyGeneral of the United States withsuch questions.”
By Melissa Brown
News Editor
The Student Governmentssociation has adopted newmendments to its ethics billhat outline minor and majoriolations that will result inpecific sanctions if commit-ed by SGA members.SGA Attorney Generalshley Vickers said the ethicsill, which was added to theode of Laws during the 2011-012 academic year, lackedffectiveness and wasn’tnforceable because the origi-al language lacked specifics.“What we kind of saw aeed to do in my office andhroughout SGA is create spe-ifics for our ethical expecta-ions, rather than just stating,You should be ethical,’” sheaid.According to the bill, whichas authored by Vickers,he new amendments defineminor” and “major” vio-ations. Minor violationsnclude “MIP [minor in pos-ession], MIC [minor in con-umption], MIL [minor inounge], Possession of a FakeD, Academic Misconduct, orny action which is unbecom-ng of a member of the SGA.”SGA members who com-it minor violations will beequired to complete 10 hoursf community service in addi-ion to hours required byniversity, local or federallaws. Minor violators will notbe in danger of expulsion, sus-pension, barring from futureoffice or suspension of pay,according to the bill.Major violations include“DUI, Public Intoxication, pos-session of any illegal drugs,assault, theft, or any actionwhich irreparably harms theimage, mission or success of the SGA.”Under a major violation,SGA members would be sub- ject to minimum sanctions,including 20 communityservice hours and disquali-fication for any end-of-the-year awards or accolades.Violators could also face sus-pension or expulsion fromoffice, withholding of pay,removal of parking privilegesor permanent expulsion fromSGA.Vickers said includingthese specifics in the billwould benefit SGA membersand UA students.“This is kind of a safeguardfor the SGA for years to comeand also holds us to a higherstandard, rather than justadding fluff to the document,”she said. “That’s what I want-ed to do, to give this someteeth and make ourselvesaccountable to students.”Members will sign a waiv-er stating that if they arereferred to Judicial Affairsfor any violation, JudicialAffairs then has the right toinform the SGA advisor whowill then notify the attorneygeneral.
ednesday, October 17, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 40
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................6
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .......................8Puzzles ......................7Classifieds ................7
Clear
79º/59º
Thursday 75º/46º
Chance of a thunderstorm
 
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CULTURE
PAGE 6Creative Campus plans sessionson hands-on projects
DO IT YOURSELF
NEWS
| LAW SCHOOL
NEWS
| STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
CULTURE
| KENTUCK
SPORTS
| FISHING
Former Attorney General speaks at law school
Don Siegelman trialtopic of discussion
UA SGA leadersoutline changesto code of ethics
Alabama’s fishing team nationally recognized since 2006 founding
By Collin Ciepiela
Contributing Writer
Looking for a leisurely day onthe water? You won’t find it as amember of Alabama’s competi-tive fishing team.This little-known UA teamcompetes for national accoladesyear in and year out, and it’s notfootball. The club fishing teamhas been collecting awardssince its establishment in 2006.“We, as a team, have com-peted very well in the past fewnational championships andhave placed numerous top-5finishes in other large tourna-ments,” Dustin Connell, three-time University of AlabamaAngler of the Year, said.The team won the firstnational championship in itsinaugural season of 2006 andrecently has had many top fin-ishes. The 24-member team tookfourth place in the College BassNational Championships in Julyand placed fourth at the SECFLW College Championship,qualifying the team for thenational championships in thespring.Like any other sport, there is asystem of ranking the top teamsnationwide. The Association of Collegiate Anglers system isrecognized as being the mostefficient and accurate, accord-ing to head angler LoganJohnson. Alabama is currentlyranked ninth out of 500 teams.The team’s events also oftenget broadcasted nationwide.The main networks to tune inand watch are NBC Sports andESPNU. The team will competeDec. 23 at 1 p.m. on NBC Sports.“I would have to say that themedia exposure that we receivehas to be the most exciting partabout it,” angler Keith Kirkleysaid. “The tournament thatstands out to me the most is therecent national championshipat Pickwick Lake, where ourteam received a lot of televisiontime.”
Team hopes NCAArecognition will come
The UA fishing team has been collecting awards since itsestablishment in 2006.
Kentuck Festival of theArts returns for 41st year
By Kristen Feyt 
Contributing Writer
Ranked in the “2012 TopTen Fairs and Festivals,”the Kentuck Festival of theArts will return this yearwith 265 booths and morethan 400 artists. The festi-val, in its 41st year, will takeplace Oct. 20 and 21 andfeature artists ranging fromfolk to contemporary.The festival originallybegan as a celebration forNorthport, Ala., in 1971and was so popular thatit eventually grew overfour decades to becomethe Kentuck Festival of theArts.“Every year, Kentuckis a mix of favorites,” JanPruitt, executive director of Kentuck, said. “It’s going tobe more of the same greatstuff we always have, witha few new great featuresput in.”This year, the festival willfeature an acoustic stage formusicians not only to per-form their music, but alsoto teach the audience howto write and compose theirown songs. Other interac-tive demonstrations includebasket making, woodwork-ing, blacksmith demonstra-tions, jewelry making, aswell as free hands-on artmaking for children.“Visitors return everyyear because Kentuck isstrictly an arts festival,one that ensures qualitythrough a jury process todetermine the artist thatwill be featured in the festi-val,” Pruitt said.Sarah Earnest, a seniormajoring in graphic design,has attended every yearsince she was young.
Amendments to lastyear’s policy passed
SEE
KENTUCK
PAGE 2SEE
FISHING
PAGE 2SEE
ETHICS
PAGE 2SEE
GONZALES
PAGE 5
More than 400 localartists to participate
CW | Austin BigoneySubmittedSubmittedSubmitted
I don’t know a lot aboutAlabama’s immigration laws,but I do think that our statesare trying to appease theirconstituents.
— Alberto Gonzales
Submitted
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
LUNCH
SteakSausage & PennePanzanellaItalian Green BeansBaked Russet PotatoesVegetable Stir-fryGrilled Sesame Tofu(Vegetarian)
BURKE
LUNCH
Philly CheesesteakChicken Salad SandwichSpaghetti with Meat SauceBaked Macaroni & CheeseBroccoli & Cheddar SoupItalian Green BeansSpinach Parmesan Quiche(Vegetarian)
FRESH FOOD
LUNCH
Flank SteakBali Chicken Lettuce WrapsMeat Lover’s StromboliBraised CabbagePotatoes Au GratinCorn ChowderPasta Primavera Salad(Vegetarian)
BRYANT
LUNCH
Chicken Macaroni & CheeseBakeGrannies Meatloaf Creamy PotatoesSeasoned PeasSweet Creamed CornRoasted vegetable PizzaVegetable Fried Rice(Vegetarian)
ON THE MENU
DINNER
Chicken TendersHoney Lemon BBQ ChickenPepperoni PizzaFettuccine AlfredoGarden BurgerBaked Macaroni & CheeseBarley & Lentil Soup(Vegetarian)
LAKESIDETHURSDAY 
 What:
Our Stories Remem-ber: A Breast Cancer lecture
 Where:
Gorgas Library 205
 When:
3:30 p.m. to4:30 p.m.
 What:
Nachos for Needy
 Where:
Delta Zeta House
 When:
11 p.m. to 2 a.m.
 What:
Homegrown AlabamaFarmers Market
 Where:
Canterbury EpiscopalChapel
 When:
3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
TODAY 
 What:
Spanish Movie Night:‘Zoot Suit’
 Where:
Lloyd Hall
 When:
6:30 p.m.
 What:
Ullman/Swell Quartet
 Where:
Moody MusicBuilding
 When:
7:30 p.m.
 What:
Head to Toe BusinessAttire Seminar
 Where:
120 Lloyd Hall
 When:
4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
FRIDAY 
 What:
Faces of Violence
 Where:
Ferguson CenterRoom 360
 When:
2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
 What:
Dance Alabama!
 Where:
Morgan HallAuditorium
 When:
5:30 p.m.
 What:
Donny McCaslinQuartet
 Where:
Moody MusicBuilding
 When:
7:30 p.m.
GO
GO
Page 2• Wednesday,October 17, 2012
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036Advertising: 348-7845Classifieds: 348-7355
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FOLLOW US ONTWITTER@THECRIMSONWHITE VISIT US ONLINE ATCW.UA.EDU
When SGA members’ violationsare brought to light, they will under-go a hearing procedure that is alsooutlined in the new bill. Vickers saidshe worked with the UA Legal Officeand the Office of Judicial Affairs tooutline the hearing process.Seven justices from the JudicialBoard are selected at random tohear members’ cases.Chief Justice of the JudicialBranch Joe Hart said the new billwas necessary to provide clear-cutdefinitions of expectations.“We didn’t have the best account-ability measures to where even isomeone did commit a major viola-tion, we didn’t have any way to doanything about it,” he said. “Andthat protects the members, becauseit defines a standard of behavior thatwe expect out of them. If membersdo commit these violations, then wecan hold them accountable.”
ETHICS
FROM PAGE 1
SGA adopts changesto ethics legislation
The sport of competitive fishingis one that starts at a young agefor anglers who fish local tour-naments and gain sponsors byworking their way up the ranks.Because of NCAA regulationsabout amateur status, this makesit difficult for the sport to becomeNCAA sanctioned.But with the high cost of tour-nament fees, boat, equipment andtravel expenses, these sponsor-ships are essential for anglersto stay competitive and poten-tially turn professional. Alabama,for example, has sponsors likeDuckett Rods, Guy Harvey andStriking Lure.Some anglers fear that if itdoes become part of the NCAA,it would hurt the sport becausegaining sponsors and recognitionare a key factor in starting froma young age. Johnson agrees thatsome changes need to be made byboth sides to ensure members canstill have the ability to get expo-
FISHING
FROM PAGE 1
Anglers think fishingcould be NCAA sport
“It’s always been a thing mymom and I have done togethersince I was little and is somethingwe share,” Earnest said. “ I look for-ward to it every year and get reallyexcited about it because it sets thetone of the season. The atmosphereis always as great as the art.”Last year’s festival hosted over15,000 people who came from allthroughout the country to be a partof the celebration.“This year, we have 25 percentmore people applying to be a partof the festival. I would love to havethem all participate, but space isalways an issue,” Pruitt said. “Thefestival is big enough to be abso-lutely dazzling, but not too big as towhere visitors aren’t able to enjoyall of the art within two days.”Pruitt said without the help of the volunteers, the festival wouldnever be possible.“The teamwork that happenshere is the reason that we are ableto have so many years of the fes-tival.”Pruitt said she loves the aura of the festival with the music, foodand artwork.“You may not love everythingyou see, but you’ll definitely seesomething you love,” Pruitt said.The festival will take placefrom 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oct. 20 and21. Tickets for the festival are $10per person and can be purchasedonline at www.kentuck.org.
KENTUCK
FROM PAGE 1
Kentuck sees 25percent more apply
sure to help their career.“I think, eventually, fishing willbecome an NCAA sport becauseof how much it is growing. Everyyear, the team grows larger andlarger,” Connell said.A big part of the team isthe competitiveness of mem-bers, every one of whom wantto be the best angler in thecountry. However, anotheraspect is the comradery. Thesport season is from Februaryuntil the end of May, with atournament almost every week-end. The team becomes anextended family, members said.“I joined the fishing team atAlabama because it was a greatlearning opportunity, learning tofish different lakes and learninghow to compete at national tour-naments,” Connell said. “I alsomade a lot of friends by joiningthe team. A lot of the guys on theteam are my best friends now.”
 
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Wednesday, October 17, 2012
N
E
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S
N
EWS
O
PINION
C
ULTURE
S
PORTS
Page 3
By Marc Torrance
Assistant Sports Editor
The rivalry between TheUniversity of Alabama andAuburn University may addanother component this springin the form of a hovercraft race.Hisham Ali, a UA senior andaerospace engineering major,recently submitted a proposalto the College of Engineeringto create an Alabama hover-craft team. The proposal wasapproved shortly before fallbreak.Ali and three other aero-space engineering seniors areplanning to build a fully func-tional hovercraft as part of theirsenior design project. They hopeto bring a hovercraft race toTuscaloosa in coordination withHoverclub of America.“The problem is, these nation-al hover rallies are always in thesummer, and that’s not good foran academic design schedule,”Ali said. “So, I proposed that weorganize our own race.”Hoverclub of America spon-sors hovercraft races across thecountry, but it has never heldone in Alabama. Auburn createda hovercraft team in 2003 andwon second place overall at itsfirst rally.Auburn’s team, the HoveringTigers, hasn’t raced in a fewyears, but they are constructinga craft to race later this year. Alicontacted the team about hold-ing a race in Alabama.“Our goal is to have this raceby the end of March,” Ali said.The races aregenerally heldduring the courseof a weekend ina public parkalong a river orlake. The coursemust cover bothland and water.In addition to therace, these hoverrallies ofteninclude a barbecue, campingand technical seminars aboutbuilding hovercrafts.Kent Gano, racing director of Hoverclub of America, recentlyvisited Ali in Tuscaloosa afterhe was contacted about spon-soring a race. While no specificlocation has been set, they areconsidering locations such asLake Lurleen in Tuscaloosa,Lake Martin near Montgomeryand Chewacla State Park inAuburn.Gano said the race could bethe starting point of an entirecollegiate division of hovercraftracing.“This is the beginning of apossible region sports event,”Gano said. “This could hopefullyturn into a nice little college-type competitionevery year.”The first stepfor Ali and histeam, however,is actually build-ing the craft.The College of Engineering hasgiven the teamspace in the aero-space structureslab in Hardaway Hall to houseand construct their vehicle.The team will compete in theFormula S class, which allows just a single engine and singlefan.Hovercrafts are typicallypiloted by a single driver andcan reach speeds of 60 mph ona land and water track. Somecrafts are built from a structuredset of plans, while others containoriginal design and ingenuity.The project is split into fourareas of design: controls, propul-sion, structures and aerodynam-ics. Each of the four seniors arein charge of one area. They alsohave a team of underclassmenworking with them so that thehovercraft team can continueeven after they graduate.Ali hopes to have the plan-ning phase done by Novemberand the construction done byFebruary so the driver canget comfortable with the craftbefore a March race.“It’s basically a frictionlessvehicle,” Ali said, “so you can gopretty fast.”While teams from across thecountry would be invited tocompete at a hovercraft race inAlabama, the Alabama-Auburnangle would certainly produceinterest for locals.“That would be cool becauseit would be something that’s notbrute sports,” Thomas Zeiler,an associate professor of aero-space engineering and advisorfor the senior design project,said. “That’s a lot more technicalthan football.”
By Adrienne Burch
Staff Reporter
Sitting through lecturesall day and spending endlessnights studying can make areal job seem distant for mostcollege students. However, sev-eral University of Alabama stu-dents had the chance this pastweekend to get a taste of whatlife outside of the classroomwill be like.Five UA students trav-eled to Dauphin Island Oct.12-14 to work alongside FoodNetwork star Martie Duncanin a culinary event. Duncanwas a recent finalist on FoodNetwork’s “Food NetworkStar.”The team of UA studentshelped Duncan plan, set-upand execute the 2012 Seafood,Science & Celebrity event.Diana DeFatta, a seniormajoring in restaurant andhospitality management, waschosen to attend this event inorder to give her experience inher field of study.“I was able to have my firstreal world experience andhands-on experience,” DeFattasaid, “which is something Icould not get in the classroomsetting.”DeFatta was able to utilizeher major concentration of meetings and event planningas she helped set up and workthe event.“I learned that there is a lotof work that goes into mak-ing an event,” DeFatta said.“There is a lot of physical work,lots of heavy lifting and lots of details.”The involvement of Alabamastudents was coordinated bythe new UA chapter of MeetingsProfessionals International.MPI is designed to help stu-dents gain industry experienceand connect them to industryprofessionals before they enterthe workforce. Alyssa Tilkin,co-founder of UA MPI, was thestudent leader of the event thispast weekend.“This was an incredible expe-rience for all of our members,”Tilkin said. “One chef told mehe thought we were event staff.He was surprised to find outwe were students from TheUniversity of Alabama.”Alexa Verroi, a senior major-ing in advertising, recentlygot involved with UA MPI. Sheworked as a culinary assistantfor the weekend, somethingshe had never done before.“I’ve had never done eventsbefore,” Verroi said. “So, I wasable to experience the real lifecomplete chaos that is eventplanning.”In addition to all the hardwork that went into this week-end, Verroi said it was a plus torub elbows with a few celebri-ties, as well. The students notonly met Martie Duncan, butalso former UA football playerBob Baumhower and formerAmerican Idol winner andAlabama native Taylor Hicks,the featured performer atthe event.
Food Network Star enlists help of UA students
Seniors to build hovercraft, race AU
 This is the beginning of apossible region sports event. This could hopefully turninto a nice little college-typecompetition every year.
— Kent Gano
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