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TT 10.18.12

TT 10.18.12

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ALLISON EAST
Staff Reporter
The city o Ruston recently installed new stopsigns at the intersection o Wisteria Street andHergot Avenue.Tech police Chie Randal Hermes said heorrowed a speed trailer rom the Ruston PoliceDepartment in the spring to monitor requencyand speed through the intersection.“We elt rom everything that had been report-ed to us and just through our observations thecars going through there were going too ast,” hesaid. “Cars going through there seemed to be go-ing about 30 or 35 and the speed limit is 20, andsure enough, that was the case.”Because Hergot Avenue is a city street,Hermes asked the city to install the stop signs toslow trac and to prevent uture crosswalk ac-cidents.Austin Miller, a junior construction technol-ogy engineering major, understands rst handthe danger o an intersection without stop signsecause he was hit in the crosswalk in ront o Mitchell Dorm in 2010.“My situation could have beneted rom astop sign or a little more attention by campus andlocal police on enorcing rules o crosswalks,” hesaid.Though Miller advocated sidewalks, he saidthe new additions are not a great decision.“I eel like they are a good thought, but theyare possibly in the wrong place,” he said. “Theydo not seem to be near the aviation building, theusiest crosswalk on that street.”Tyler Smith, a junior electrical engineeringand math major, does not agree with the additiono the stop signs.“My rst thought when I got the email romthe police department that they were putting astop sign there was that it was stupid,” he said.“There’s not nearly enough trac to make thatnecessary.”Smith said he has not done the research, buthe believes the stop signs do more harm thangood.“It’s denitely inconvenient or me, and I don’tsee what it hurts,” he said. “Maybe we could get acrossing guard instead.”Andrew Rigley, a sophomore nanoengineer-ing major, said the stop signs make sense to pro-tect some particular pedestrians.“I’ve gone running by there when school isgetting out, and some o those kids actually walk to locations on campus,” he said. “I they comerunning through the crosswalk, the driver is li-able.”Rigley said the refective nature o stop signsattracts more attention than an average personwalking through the area.Police are taking measures to bring attentionto the new stop signs, Hermes said.“We have those portable signs to sit in thestreet because people were just driving throughthem – including police cars. We’ll keep them out
PRSRT STDNON-PROFITORGANIZATIONUS POSTAGE
PAID
RUSTON, LAPERMIT NO 104RETURNSERVICEREQUESTED
RANEY JOHNSON
Staff Reporter
Climbing and leaping over walls sounds likesomething Batman would do while chasing downthe Joker.However, at Tech, the Dark Knight is not theonly one doing these amazing eats; there is agroup o students who climb and leap over wallstraining or the sport o Parkour.“[Our] basic philosophy is that the world is your playground,” said Spencer Young, a seniorEnglish major. “Parkour is a discipline.”Young, who is a member o the Parkour team,said he has been doing Parkour since last Juneand he oers training to anyone who wants tolearn it every Friday at 2:30 p.m.“I am open or anybody to come out to join,”Young said. “My goal is just to introduce peopleinto a new way o working out.”Young said the rst thing to ocus on whiletraining is saety.“I teach them saety rst, because saety is animportant thing in Parkour,” he said.Many Parkour videos show people climbingand jumping rom rootops, but the training con-sists o no roo jumping. He said he steers awayrom the roo jumping.“No, we do not climb up roos,” Young said.“The rst thing people ask me i they are newor have questions is ‘do we climb up roos?’ andI say ‘no.’”Young said he keeps the training away rom
SCOTT WALKINGSTICK
Staff Reporter
The Student Government Association contin-ues in their eorts to make the student voice o Tech stronger. Whatchu Want Wednesday hasgiven SGA numerous ideas ranging rom addinmore fowers, map stations, recycling bins on cam-pus to having Quidditch as an intramural sport.Maggie Brakeville, sophomore class president,said SGA is trying with Whatchu Want Wednes-day to get students involved but needs ull cam-pus support rom the students. One thing SGA ispushing is or students to get involved in campuscommittees.There are dozens o committees on Tech’scampus. Certain committees meet on certain top-ics ranging rom parking issues, behavioral stan-dards, graduate advisory committees, astronomadvisory committee and the aesthetics o thecampus.Brakeville said she eels the aesthetics commit-tee is the most important because when studentsrst come to Tech or a tour, a beautiul campuswill always stick out in their minds. “I want stu-dents to all in love with Tech when they see it o
ALLISON EAST
Staff Reporter
About ve Saturdays each year, ans ll the usu-ally vacant Joe Aillet stadium. The stands roar, andthe ground shakes; then hungry ans wait their turnat the concession stand.At the last home game, many o those hungryans disappointed. The concession stands hadew credit card machines available, ran out o hotchocolate and let ans standing in long lines, Da-vid Anderson, a history proessor, said.“Given how well Tech ootball is doing, I wouldhope our concession service matches up to thestellar play o our team,” Anderson said. “Ourootball team doesn’t use the old single wing andmodel-T. I would hope our concession stands arestate o the art just like our team.”Anderson’s season tickets keep him on thehome side o the stadium. Jacob Tilley, a resh-man business management major, said the prob-lems are not as bad on the opposite side.“The lines weren’t that long,” Tilley said. “I paidwith Tech Express, and I just wanted a drink.”The concession stands are run by Aramark,Tech’s dining service. Robert Lubbert, district man-ager o Aramark, said he recognizes the downalls.
Photo by Sumeet Shrestha
Concessionstands leavefans unhappy
The new Parkour group at Tech combines exercise and extreme sports. Parkour was started at Tech this past summer.
Committeeswant studentvoices to beheard
>
see
CONCESSION
page 3
>
see
SGA
page 2
New stop signs installed at intersection
Photo by Deepanjan Mukhopadhyay
A new stop sign was installed at the intersection of Wisteria Street and Hergot Avenue.
>
see
PARKOUR
page 2
Man leadscops on highspeed chase
>
see
CHASE
page 6
ALLISON EAST
Staff Reporter
A 30-year-old man was charged Saturday nightin connection with a high-speed chase on I-20westbound.A member o the Ouachita Parish SpeciaCrimes Apprehension Team pulled over EddieJackson Jr. or a trac violation near the CampRoad exit. Ater initially pulling over, Jackson fedthe scene, said Major Mike Moore, director o theOuachita Parish uniorm patrol division.
TalkTech
T
he
The student voice of Louisiana Tech University
October 18, 2012 www.thetechtalk.org 
Volume 87Number 6
 
EXTREME PARKOUR
 New group brings the sport to Tech
 
KEEPING IT IN THE FAMILY
 
PAGE
5
PAGE
5
KAB MAN!
Tech theater kicks off with...
 
Read about how one Tech student balances diabetes with school 
PAGE
7
Check out our exclusive interview with the ‘Duck Dynasty’ 
diabetesDealing 
with
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STOP
page 6
 
 jumping o roos aroundcampus or training aroundthe power plant. Instead, theypractice around more ac-ceptable places on campus.“We practice out in ronto the student center, in ronto the art building and a ewplaces around downtown,”Young said.One o the moves Youngsaid he does ocus on is thewall up.“[It] is basically where youclimb up a wall without theuse o ropes,” he said.Young said another moveused in training is the vault, amove that uses just the handsto jump over an obstacle andmust be done by keepingow.“Flow is how ast you goor how you use your momen-tum,” Young said. “I I wereto vault o o a wall, I wouldhave to keep ow.”Nick Meade, a junior ki-nesiology major, is also parto the Parkour team andtrains people who would liketo try it out Monday throughThursday at various times.“Parkour is about tryingto fnd the quickest way toget rom point A to point B,”Meade said.Meade said a lot o stu-dents have come out to sup-port Parkour. He continuesto welcome newcomers, and just like Young, he also triesto make those who want to be trained understand theimportance o saety.“With Parkour, peopleworry whether or not theyare going to hurt themselvesor the environment,” Meadesaid.Meade said because o the sport’s ocus on usingthe environment, Tech policemight have a problem withthe team’s use o the cam-pus.“Tech cops and ofcialsmay have a problem withwhat we are doing, but we arenot going to disrespect Techproperty,” Meade said. “We just want to have un.”Meade said he hopes theteam will one day be able togo to competitions, but usu-ally, most o the competi-tions are too ar away.“At the current momentour plan is to get ourselves atthe level to compete,” Meadesaid. “Maybe as we becomea bigger and better group wemay one day be able to holdour own competitions here.”Meade said he hopes tocontinue to get more peopleto come out and try Parkour.“For some people I think it’s just a love,” Meade said.“Some people just love to y.”
Email comments to rcj008@latech.edu.
ALLISON EAST
Staff Reporter
As students hurriedly walk to class, bright colors jump o the gray pavement. Words andimages wait to catch their eyeand to point them in the direc-tion o Tech’s next big event.Chalk can be an eectiveway or organizations to keepstudents inormed, but lawsand school statutes imposea ew more regulations thanplayground monitors o thepast.“I it’s something legitimate,that’s one thing,” said RandallHermes, Tech chie o police.“There’s a dierence betweenthat and someone being juve-nile.”Hermes said the policetypically do not worry aboutchalk advertisements, but in-appropriate images or phraseswritten in chalk are dealt withimmediately.“We’ve had that happen be-ore,” he said. “Something waswritten on the concrete aboutone o our emale students insidewalk chalk. We had to takea picture and clean it up.”Kaiti Rees, coordinator o church relations or the WesleyFoundation, watched studentsuse chalk to build people uprather than tear them down.“We did a midnight chalk run,” Rees said. “They went atmidnight and littered the cam-pus with phrases like ‘You’re beautiul’ and things like that — just little phrases o en-couragement to put smiles onpeople’s aces. The purposewas simply to brighten some-one’s day.”In addition to making peo-ple smile, the Wesley Founda-tion also uses chalk to adver-tise its events.“We have chosen to ad-vertise or things we do at theWesley utilizing chalk becauseit’s cheap,” Rees said. “It’s verynoticeable. It catches people’seyes. A lot o our students arevery creative, and they like toexpress themselves and havesome un.”Other organizations oncampus choose to advertise indierent ways.Union Board makes Face- book events, posts iers anduses A-rames, but chalk is notone o their preerred meth-ods o advertisement, Doug-las Prater, president o UnionBoard, said.“I’m not really sure why wedon’t use chalk,” he said. “We just never have. We have manyother proessional ways topublicize events, and chalk justseems very crude and unpro-essional.”Philip Ernst, a reshmanchemical engineering major,sees the chalk but is not im-pressed.“Sometimes it’s all over theplace,” he said. “It looks tacky.It doesn’t make me jump or joy about going to the events.”Ernst said some chalk isfne, but writing on the build-ings and in the heart o cam-pus is too much.“I think they should maybestop doing it in the middle o campus,” he said. “It’s fne onthe outside sidewalks but keepit there.”Besides being labeled tacky,using chalk to advertise or toconvey a message, negativeor positive, can all subject tostate laws.According to Louisiana Re-vised Statute 56.4, “It shall beunlawul or any person to in-tentionally deace with graftiimmovable or movable proper-ty, whether publicly or privatelyowned, without consent o theowner.”Part B o that statute de-fnes deacing as damaging bymeans o painting, marking,scratching, drawing or etching.The punishment dependson the severity o deacement but can mean a hety fne and jail time. Deacement canalso violate university policy6.04:04 and result in a punish-ment rom the school.“Our community standardis going to be dierent romthe French Quarter,” Hermessaid. “I it oends somebody,it’s a problem. I it’s a studentthey’re going to go beore judi-cial aairs.”Rain can wash away thechalk, but it cannot wash awaythe marks it makes on a record.Bright colors can lead to dimdays.
Email comments to ace007@latech.edu.
2
The Tech Talk
October 18, 2012
Typing or 10 oerscash or students
For the next week studentscan come to Tolliver Hall or theStudent Center between 9 a.m.and 5 p.m. and type to earn $10.Students can type twice thisquarter or a total o $20.Typing or 10 is a part o theCenter or Secure Cyberspace’sresearch on keystroke dynam-ics. Students will be asked totype answers to 10 questions.Students can attend Typingor 10 through October 28.For more inormation con-tact the Center or Secure Cy-erspace at 318-257-3475 orryates@latech.edu.
Counseling Centeroers workshop
The Counseling Center is o-ering a workshop Monday andTuesday rom 4-6 p.m. in KeenyHall Room 337.The workshop is a largerworkshop setting that providesstudents the opportunity orsel-assessment, help identiy-ing potential occupations andmajors, with the option or ol-low-up with a counselor.Advance registration is re-quired and can be attained romthe Counseling Center in KeenyHall.For more inormation, con-tact the Counseling Center at318-257-2488 or aallen@latech.edu.
Bowling team hostsHalloween Bash
The women’s bowling teamwill host the Halloween Bowl-ing Bash Thursday, Oct. 25 atLambright Intramural CenterBowling Alley.Dierent squads bowl at var-ious times, including 5-6 p.m.,6-7 p.m., 7-8 p.m., 8-9 p.m. and9-10 p.m.The entry ee is $5 per per-son and there is a $2 covercharge or those not interestedin bowling. Tickets can be pur-chased at the ront desk o theLambright Intramural Center.Choose a squad with a maxi-mum o 30 bowlers and enjoyone hour o bowling with yourpaid entry.Show up in your best cos-tume and receive two ree raetickets. Each team member wille raing o a git basket at $1or each ticket.Rae tickets or those not incostume will be $1 each.There will also be a ree pho-to booth and T-shirts or sale.All proceeds go to ben-eft the Tech women’s bowlingteam.For more inormation, con-tact Emily Essex at 318-257-4634 or emily@latech.edu.
EWB to hostundraiser or trip
Engineers Without Borderswill host a dodgeball tourna-ment Thursday, Oct. 25 in theLambright Intramural Center’slue gym.Registration begins at 6 p.m.and the games begin at 6:30p.m.Teams must consist o fvepeople and the registration eeis $5 per person.Prizes or top teams could becash or git cards.Proceeds will help EWBraise money to get them to thePhilippines. They are planninga trip to bring sustainable waterand fx irrigation problems in asmall village.For more inormation, con-tact Jessica Oldham, chair o the publicity committe, at 318-400-8294 or jmo025@latech.edu.
KAB Man debuts thisweekend in Howard
From 7:30-9 p.m. Oct. 23, thedepartment o theatre will pres-ent “KAB Man” at the HowardCenter or Perorming Arts.The presentation is a recipi-ent o the Keep Louisiana Beau-tiul 2011 Innovation Award andthe Keep America Beautiul2011 Creativity in Outreach andMedia Special Recognition.“KAB Man” is returning tothe School o Perorming ArtsHoward Auditorium stage withits heroes KAB Man, Kee-La-Belle and K-Linc fghting toprotect air, water and baby peli-cans rom Big Pollution and theLeague o Trash.For more inormation, con-tact the School o the Perorm-inArtsat318-257-2711.
Campus
Photo by Sumeet Shrestha
Chalk grafti on a wall outside o the student center asks, “What kind o people are hardest to love?”
Psych intern explores options
Concerns arise with chalk notes
 
 Interesting 
 
>
PARKOUR
from pg.1
Photo by Sumeet Shrestha
Parkour participant perormsa handstand on a set o stairs.
the frst time,” she said.The purpose o the aesthet-ics committee according to theTech student handbook is toreview campus projects andmake recommendations to theTech president as to the beau-tifcation merit o the proposedproject.“The aesthetic committeeis in charge o all that, but theydon’t meet oten enough,” saidBrakeville. “We need an activeand trustworthy SGA studentrepresentative to give directionabout these kinds o things.”According to Brakeville, aregular student would be per-ect or the job.A normal student sees whatneeds to be done on cam-pus,” Brakeville said. ReginaldHanchey, chairman o the aes-thetics committee, said he be-lieves a student representativewould be a good idea.“Students have concernsand experience problems thataculty, staand administratorsare unaware o,” Hanchey said.He said the aesthetics com-mittee does not purchase ma-terials or initiate programs andsaid the committee is only con-cerned about issues that wouldpermanently change the ap-pearance o our campus.“I see thins ever da thatneed attention,” he said. “Edg-ing along the sidewalk, pa-per and other litter dropped by people, unattractive yerstaped to buildings, chalk ads onsidewalks, touch-ups neededon painted suraces, all thesethings are areas that need con-stant work but requires man-power which we do not haveenough o.”Hanchey said budget cutsover the past several years havegreatly impacted Tech in manyways.“An inormed student knowscuts have occurred and our ad-ministration has insisted aca-demics will remain our top pri-ority,” he said. “That means wehave ewer employees to mowand care or the green spaceon campus, and the ones thatremain have more and more todo.”Brakeville said getting a stu-dent representative on all com-mittees is highly important.“Right now we have to planmeetings and go beore thecommittee, and without a stu-dent it’s hard,” Brakeville said.“SGA wants to improve Techand let the students’ voices beheard. We are taking minorsteps, but I think SGA will oneday have Tech where it needsto be.”
Email comments to rsw020@latech.edu.
>
SGA
from pg.1
 
MELISSA GRAJEK
Staff Reporter
This is the fth in a fve-part series on the unique experi- ence o Tech students who  participated in summer intern- ships. Each o the students let Ruston to get frsthand experi- ence in their respective felds.
In most cases, experience asan intern is recommended andat times required by employers beore a graduate may be con-sidered or employment, but orpsychology majors, an intern-ship is less o a suggestion andmore o a requirement.Unlike some other majorsoered at Tech that encourageinternships or oer them as analternative to a class, psychol-ogy mandates a completion o around 3,000 internship hours beore a student may graduatewith a master’s degree.“Students are required tocomplete a practicum as parto their fnal year,” said LatoyaPierce, a psychology proessor.A practicum is a student’sfrst 100 hours o feldwork at a graduate level, Pierce ex-plained.Nicholas Wallace, a gradu-ate student in general coun-seling, is working on his fnalhours o interning beore grad-uation this all.“We are required to com-plete each internship in thetime rame o one quarter,”Wallace said.He said internships arecompleted o campus, while aweekly meeting with ellow stu-dents and proessors on cam-pus every Wednesday eveningreviews individual progress.Students are allowed to pick their internship location rom ageneral list provided, Wallacesaid.“You may work under prettymuch anyone who is a licensedproessional counselor,” hesaid.Since thousands o intern-ing hours are needed, studentsare encouraged to work in a va-riety o locations.“I have completed 100hours o practicum at CentralElementary in Webster Parish,and 300 hours o internshipat Inspirations o Ruston, anintensive outpatient program,”Wallace said.He said he is currently fn-ishing up his last internship lo-cally in Ruston at AllegianceHealth Center, an acute psychi-atric unit that serves the geriat-ric population.Although it is said that amajority o students changetheir major beore graduation,Wallace said he always knewhe wanted to help people, andater graduation he hopes towork at an inpatient psychiatrichospital where he can do justthat.“I chose Allegiance HealthCenter because I wanted togain the experience o work-ing with an inpatient setting asto become greater amiliarizedwith acute care,” he said.Unlike critical care, acutecare concentrates more onshort term care but still ocuseson serious conditions like postsurgery care and recovery.Wallace said his internshipsallowed him to connect thedots between what is taughtin class to lessons learnedthrough hands on experience.“In this program, you gainan abundance o knowledgethroughout the way,” he said.“Proessors are adamant aboutstudents leaving Tech armedwith the tools needed to do the job.”Ida Chauvin, a proessorand overseer o the psychol-ogy internship program, saidthe department has one o the broadest internship programs,allowing students a well-round-ed experience within their feldo study.As the proessor o an in-ternship class, Chauvin over-sees and monitors the progresso interning students, helpingthem with the transition romthe classroom taught conceptsto in-person experiences.“I will never orget how ac-tively concerned my supervi-sors have been that I learn asmuch as possible during myinternship experiences,” Wal-lace said.As ar as other students andeven other majors are con-cerned, Wallace maintains aconfdence in internships as achance to gain experience.“I would recommend stu-dents take any and every op-portunity to actively seek outlearning opportunities such asan internship,” Wallace said.In a feld o study where onemay never have enough experi-ence, internships provide a saeenvironment or students togain experience in everythingrom the medical aspect to the business side o the industry.“Interning has taught methe value o hard work,” Wal-lace said. “Undoubtedly, know-ing the value o hard work will be benefcial in helping mework hard to help others worhard to help themselves.”
Email comments to mag043@latech.edu.
Photo by Jessica Van Alstyne
Psychology intern Nicholas Wallace applies the lessons he haslearned rom his internships in the classroom.
 
October 18, 2012
The Tech Talk
3
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KELSY KERSHAW
Staff Reporter
As he leaned against thewooden pole, Mark Murpheysighed and smiled while helooked around at the studentssigning up to participate in thehorseless rodeo.“A horseless rodeo is rodeo-type activities without a horse,”said Murphey, an associateproessor o animal science.“There are some roping eventson oot and un games like anegg toss.”He said this is the ourth yearthat Tech has had a horselessrodeo.“The Block and Bridle Clubworks with other ag clubs,” hesaid. “It’s just un and only takesa couple o hours in the ater-noon.”When the Block and BridleClub decided to frst start hav-ing horseless rodeos, their in-tentions were not to raise mon-ey but to beneft the students o Tech, Murphey said.“The purpose o it is to havea un time and get to know peo-ple you don’t know,” he said.“Not to always sit in your dormand study, but to get outsidewith some activities and take a break.”Tanner Roberts, a sopho-more animal science major,said she loves participating inthe dierent events the rodeohas to oer.“It’s just un,” she said. “Inthe cal scramble, it’s such anadrenaline rush and it’s justriendly competition.”Students are partnered oreach event, Roberts said, andsometimes they get partneredwith someone they have nevermet beore.“It’s a great way to meetpeople,” she said. “Last yearwas my frst year so I just askedsomeone to be my partner andmade a new riend.”Everyone is welcome tocome out and to participate inthe annual horseless rodeo, shesaid.The atmosphere o being onsouth campus and participatingin an enjoyable event is what at-tracted sophomore agricultureeducation major, Vincent Bahm.“I grew up on a arm,” hesaid. “The atmosphere and el-lowship o the rodeo makes meeel right at home.”Bahm said he was hookedrom the frst time he set oot onsouth campus.“I participated in the horse-less rodeo my reshman year,”he said. “I ell in love with theevent.”To the participants, it is notabout harsh competition orwinning, said Sarah Cook, asophomore pre-vet major, it isabout the experience.“I participated a little last year but this year I participat-ed in every event,” she said. “Ienjoy the time spent with myriends while we have a goodtime.”The horseless rodeo is de-signed to accommodate every-one, even those who may not be interested in rodeos, saidMurphy Colvin, a junior pre-vetmajor.“We have the cal scramble,where you and your teammatehave to bring a 600-poundsteer to the ground and take alivestock sticker o o his ore-head,” he said. “Then we havean egg toss, which really isn’t arodeo event, but we just wanteveryone to have un.”Cameron White, a sopho-more pre-vet major, said thesame thing.“My avorite event was thecal scramble because it wassuch an adrenaline rush,” Whitesaid.All o these participantssaid the one thing they agreeon is the good time they knowthey will have while participat-ing. Like Murphey said, a good,un time was the sole intention behind the development o thehorseless rodeo.The Block and Bridle Club ishappy to sponsor such a light-hearted event or students, Rob-erts said.Colvin, White, Cook andBahm said they are all activemembers o the club and have been involved since their resh-man year. They said the event issomething they look orward toeach year.“Anything I can do to spendtime with the Tech amily Ilove,” Bahm said. “I will do it.”
Email comments to kjk016@latech.edu.
APRIL KELLEY
Staff Reporter
Kenneth Robbins hasstepped aside as director o the School o Perorming Artsater 15 years in the position.Mark Guinn, theater proessorand production manager orthe department o theater, hastaken his place as the director.The director o the Schoolo Perorming Arts is responsi-le or management and lead-ership o the school.“It’s quite an exciting jobopportunity or me, steppingup rom production coordina-tor with the department o theater and overseeing the en-tire school,” Guinn said.Guinn had been workingwith the department o music,ut now he will be supervisingthe entire school.“It’s cool because it’s goingto give us the opportunity togrow and develop,” Guinn said.Guinn also serves as one o only 17 working certifed stagecombat trainers in the nationwith the Society o AmericanFight Directors as well as acertifed teacher or the BritishAcademy o Stage and ScreenCombat. Guinn teaches stagecombat as a fght master withthe Society o American FightDirectors, an organizationdedicated to the training andaesthetics o stage combat inperormance, Guinn said.These two sides o Guinn’sproession coincide during his22 years at Tech.“In the frst year, I organizedwith Tech Theater Players theStage Combat Workshop atTech which has grown intoone o the oldest and well-respected regional stage com- bat workshops in the nation,”Guinn said.Guinn said he had never in-tended to work in theater untilhis junior year at Center Col-lege in Danville, Ky.“I started o with ull inten-tions o being a wildlie bota-nist,” Guinn said.As part o his general edu-cation requirements, however,Guinn took an art class wherehe had to do a sculpture andhe enjoyed it so much that hetook several more art classes.“That’s how I kind o gothooked,” Guinn said. “I endedup in theater where I realizedit was nothing more than a bigol’ laboratory where you got toplay with lights and I discoverdmy love o light as a orm o sculpture.”The summer ater his dis-covery o his love o light andtheater, he got his frst proes-sional job at an outdoor dramain Ohio called Blue JacketOutdoor Drama.He worked there rom itsopening season until theyclosed their doors 28 years lat-er. It was at Blue Jacket whereGuinn ound his calling.“In the middle o all this, Iwas like ‘Oh my God, I didn’tknow that I could make moneydoing this kind o stu.’ That’swhere my interest piqued,”Guinn said.Guinn began training withthe Society o American Fight-er Directors during this time,as well as pursuing urther edu-cation. He received his gradu-ate degree at Memphis StateUniversity.Guinn also spent time work-ing or a lighting company outo Los Angeles in the late ‘80s.This provided him with the op-portunity to go on big-nametours. He traveled alongsideMadonna on her Blonde Am- bition Tour and went on threeseparate tours alongside BobDylan, though he never got tomeet these musical icons.“I was sitting outside o his[Dylan’s] door one time be-cause they knew I was swash- buckler and Bob wanted tolearn how to sling steel, but itnever happened,” said Guinn.Guinn has since taught atrespected national workshops,such as the British NationalScreen Combat Workshopand the National Screen Com- bat Workshop. Guinn said hegreatly appreciates his promo-tion. He said he knows thathard work and maybe a bit o luck are to thank or the cata-pult to his new position.“I have been lucky, I think, but a large part o that luck was based on endeavor andhard work,” Guinn said.
Email comments to ask012@latech.edu.
Photo by Shradha Bhandari SharmaPhoto by Grace Moore
Mark Guinn instructs the stage technicians on how to adjust thelighting on the stage.
Fight master takescharge of school
Students encouragerodeo participation
Kendyl Balentine attempts to rope in a sheep in a scramble event.
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CONCESSION
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“They asked i we wantedto advertise on the Jumbotron,”he said. “No. It would kill us. Wecan’t serve that many people.”Lubbert said credit card ma-chines cost $10,000 and spend-ing such a great amount orfve days a year simply is notworth it. Aramark does bringmachines rom main campusto the games, and the stands doaccept Tech Express.“It’s a tricky operation,”he said. “Currently, it’s notequipped to satisy the volume.”Game day is a long processor Aramark, Lubbert said. Theytypically cater a reception atthe president’s home, maintainthe caeteria and provide or thestands all in one main-campuskitchen.“In an ideal world everythingwould be prepared on premise,ut right now, only popcorn is,”he said.Aramark vans bring oodrom the Student Center to thestadium. The delay rom trafcand parking can compromisethe ood, Lubbert said.Anderson suggested threemain areas the concessionstands could improve.“I’d like to see conveniencein pay,” Anderson said. “Theyneed more modern ood displayand ood choice. I’d like to seethe souvenir cups back.”Lubbert said Aramark plansto fx all these areas. They haveopened up additional check-outlines and allowed third-partyvendors to supplement theirood. Pizza, unnel cakes, hotchocolate and sno-balls are justsome o the additions these businesses provide.“I they want to have othervendors, that’s fne,” Andersonsaid. “I think the ood choicesshould be more inventive andhelp them make more money.”The souvenir cups will beaddressed hopeully by the nexthome game, Lubbert said. Acollection eaturing ormer oot- ball players is on its way.Aramark’s best chance o im-proving the concession stands,he said, is in the blueprints.The new acility planned orthe south end zone and unded by the sel-assessed ee passed by students last year will haveathletic ofces, a banquet roomand, hopeully, a kitchen.“For the puzzle to come to-gether, it has to have a kitchenin the new center to be able toprovide ood or that acility,”Lubbert said. “It will add to thequality and help us produceood or the concession standon premise.”
Email comments to ace007@latech.edu.

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