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Dredged Up From the Past - Issue 11 - Archaeology Finds Reporting Service Newsletter

Dredged Up From the Past - Issue 11 - Archaeology Finds Reporting Service Newsletter

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Published by Wessex Archaeology
Welcome to issue 11 of Dredged Up, the newsletter of the BMAPA/TCE/EH Protocol Implementation Service.
We have seen a slight drop over the last two years of finds being reported through the Protocol. This may be due to any number of factors, such as less dredging taking place or dredging targeting deeper sediments, the surface layers having already been dredged. Whatever the cause, it is especially important that you keep reporting discoveries so that we can build a better picture of our submerged heritage, and demonstrate the industry’s commitment to dealing with our cultural heritage.
Welcome to issue 11 of Dredged Up, the newsletter of the BMAPA/TCE/EH Protocol Implementation Service.
We have seen a slight drop over the last two years of finds being reported through the Protocol. This may be due to any number of factors, such as less dredging taking place or dredging targeting deeper sediments, the surface layers having already been dredged. Whatever the cause, it is especially important that you keep reporting discoveries so that we can build a better picture of our submerged heritage, and demonstrate the industry’s commitment to dealing with our cultural heritage.

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Published by: Wessex Archaeology on Oct 19, 2012
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12/16/2012

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Protocol Update
1
Welcome to issue 11 of Dredged Up, thenewsletter of the BMAPA/TCE/EH ProtocolImplementation Service.We have seen a slight drop over the lasttwo years of finds being reported throughthe Protocol. This may be due to anynumber of factors, such as less dredgingtaking place or dredging targeting deepersediments, the surface layers havingalready been dredged. Whatever thecause, it is especially important thatyou keep reporting discoveries so thatwe can build a better picture of oursubmerged heritage, and demonstratethe industry’s commitment to dealingwith our cultural heritage.This issue discusses the importance of shipwrecks as sources of archaeologicalmaterial (see pages 4-5). A case study of the SS can be found on page 6.There has been an array of interesting findsreported through the Protocol since the lastissue. See pages 2-3 for some of thehighlights.Wooden finds are often dredged from thesea. Find out what to do with them in ourguide on page 7.
Mendi
how toTeam News
The team has seen a great deal of change this year. We have said farewellto Sarah Phillips and Katie Card, whohave moved on to exciting new projects,and welcomed in their places LauraJoyner and Angus Forshaw. Laura andAngus will be working on the Protocolunder the guidance of Gemma Ingasonand Euan McNeill, who manages theproject on behalf of Wessex Archaeology.
protocol@wessexarch.co.uk or call 01722 326 867
DredgedUp
from the past
Autumn 2012
Issue 11Archaeology Finds Reporting Service Newsletter
Laura Joyner and Angus Forshaw 
Don’t forget: If you want an awarenesstalk to refresh staff about the Protocol,get in touch with the team on:
 Awareness visit at Cemex’s Leamouth Wharf 
 
Since the last issue of Dredged Up a widevariety of exciting finds spanning all timeperiods have been reported, all helping toincrease our understanding of the past.In March 2012 Darryl Mason discovereda Single Sheave Snatch Block on board(Hanson). It dates to the 20thcentury and would have been importantfor moving cargo on and off ships. It wasdredged from Licence Area 328/1, off thecoast of Great Yarmouth.The detailed photographs provided byGreenwich Wharf significantly aided theidentification of this find (above) fromLicence Area 447. A translation of theGerman wording (aircraft)and (Manufacturer:Car…) identified it as part of a landing lightfrom an aircraft. The partial wordrefers to Carl Zeiss AG, a manufacturerof photographic and optical equipment.
 Arco Adu
FlugzaeugeHersteller: Car…Car...
Finds from 2011-2012
2
Single Sheave Snatch Block - Hanson
5 cm
Recovered from Licence Area 447 TarmacSchermuly naval rocket line thrower Schermuly remains fromGreenwich Wharf Detail
2 mm5 cm
A very small stone bead measuringjust 5mm in diameter was foundby John Pye in the East CoastChannel region (CEMEX). Beadssuch as this have been used fordecorative purposes from thePalaeolithic period (approximately970,000 — 10,500 years ago) onwards.There is a huge variety of finds reportedthrough the Protocol every year. Of particular interest were the remains of a Schermuly naval rocket line thrower,reported through the Munitions Protocoland identified by police EOD experts(Tarmac). Designed in the 1920s by Britishinventor William Schermuly, it was intendedas a means of throwing a line from shore toship, or ship to ship, using rocket propulsion.So successful was the invention that by 1929it had become compulsory for all vesselsover 500 tons to carry line throwers.
 
This year we have had a large number of cannonballs reported from within LicenceArea 127. It is likely that the majority of these were fired from sakers, a family of guns used from the 16th century until theearly 18th century. Although these findsdo not appear to be associated with anywrecks the Licence Area is close to severalrecorded battles, including Spanish Armadabattles, to the south of the Isle of Wight.With the numerous cannonballs reportedthis year and in previous years,it is possible that a maritimebattle may have occurredin the vicinity.
More Spoons!
We had another spoon reported recentlythrough a pilot Fishing Industry Protocol forArchaeological Discoveries (FIPAD), inspiredby the success of the BMAPA Protocol.This was a seal-top spoon made of copperalloy. These spoons were introduced duringthe reign of Elizabeth I and continued to becommon through the 17th century. They weremade with the owner’s seal at the end of thehandle, allowing letters and documents to besealed with wax.
3
You can find out moreabout FIPAD on page 8.
This article has been written by Angus Forshaw,who is learning about the BMAPA Protocol as partof his Community Archaeology Training Placement,hosted by Wessex Archaeology and funded by theCouncil for British Archaeology.
Cannonball - Tarmac
2 cm5 cm
Cannonballs fromLicence Area 127 Tarmac
5 cm
Greenwich Wharf reported three spoons thisyear. The spoons are similar in that all haveengravings on them. The engravings tell uswhat material the spoons are made of, aswell as hinting as to their usage. All thespoons were made of nickel silver. Despiteits name, nickel silver does not actuallycontain any silver, consisting of copper,zinc and tin.One of thespoons also had aserial number engraved onto its handlealong with ‘1GOR’. This informationtells us that it was a World War II issuearmy spoon, as the serial number wasa regimental number allocated to the1st battalion of the Gordon Highlanders.
Spoons fromGreewich Wharf Tarmac

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