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Cool IT v-5.Full Report

Cool IT v-5.Full Report

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Published by: samswami on Oct 20, 2012
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11/10/2013

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The Cool IT leaderboard evaluates top IT companieson their efforts to provide economy-wide climate solutions,reduce emissions from their own operations, and lobby for science-based climate and energy policies.
SOLUTIONSENERGY IMPACTADVOCACY
40 22 49 29484853 21  34  35 23151910 23 38 381145 33
ALCATEL-LUCENTAT&TCISCODELLERICSSONFUjITSUGOOGLEHCLHPIBMMICROSOFTNECNTTORACLESAPSHARPSOFTBANkTCSTELEFONICAVODAFONEWIPRO
VERSION 5: FEBRUARY 2012
COOL IT
LEADERBOARD
Detailed descriptions o all Leaderboard company scores are located on the
 
23
Just as the power o the internet has revolutionised our communication byallowing users to provide content such as video, music and text material,generating new producers, journalists and authors, IT energy-related ‘smart’solutions have the ability to put consumers in command o their electricityuse and pave the way or dramatic improvements in energy eciency anduse o renewable energy. Greenpeace’s own[E]nergy Revolutionblueprint,which outlines
a sustainable pathway or a transition to having 95% o globalenergy needs met by renewable energy by 2050, a signifcant disruption o the centralised dirty energy business model by ICT technologies is essential toachieving this goal.
In 2008, the Smart 2020 Report published by leading Inormation andCommunication Technology (ICT) companies outlined in detail the businessopportunities and potential or these companies to drive transormativechange in the consumption and production o energy, with the potential todrive a reduction in greenhouse gases by at least 15% by 2020. Greenpeacebegan evaluating global ICT brands through its Cool IT Leaderboard in May2009 in order to identiy which companies were actually leading eorts todrive change in the energy sector. The Leaderboard also examines howthey use their infuence to change government policies that will drive cleanenergy deployment, and what companies were simply hand waiving on thetransormative potential o ICT energy solutions, but not seriously pursuingthese opportunities.Now, nearly our years ater the release o the Smart 2020 Report, the pictureas outlined in Version 5 o the CoolIT Leaderboard is one that, while we see asteady increase in the quantity and strength o energy solutions oerings rommany companies such as Cisco, IBM, Ericsson and Fujitsu, we also see asignicant reduction in policy advocacy to change the rules to drive investmentin clean technology and renewable energy deployment. A notable exception tothis trend is Sotbank (a new addition to the Leaderboard in Version 5), whichhas spoken up loud and long in calling or a transition away rom nuclear powerto renewable energy in Japan post Fukushima, and scoring the highest in thiscategory since the launch o the Leaderboard in 2009. The rapid growth o the sector’s energy demand continues to be a growingconcern, given the lack o commitment to ensuring that this growth is notdriving more dirty energy investment. As highlighted in last year’sLeaderboard,and more recently in the Greenpeace publications
as well as the
Guide to GreenElectronics
, the rapid expansion o telecom inrastructure and the data centres that power the ‘Cloud’ is drivingsignicant energy investment in many areas, much o it rom dirty sources, such as coal. While many brands aremaking steps to reduce pollution by increasing eciency in their products and operations, ew companies havedemonstrated a commitment to meeting their electricity needs rom renewable sources.Without much stronger leadership among companies to driving renewable energy deployment, the amount o dirtyenergy in the sector’s electricity supply chain will double and triple to keep pace with its demand, potentially lockingin another generation o dependence on coal, nuclear, and other ossil uels that the planet cannot aord.
Highlights rom this year’s Leaderboard:
Cisco, Ericsson, and Fujitsu stand out once again in the solutions criteria or providing detailed case studies o howtheir unique technology is creating pathways towards signicant emission reductions.Sotbank has set a new bar in advocacy leadership with strong statements and eorts to move Japan away romdirty energy dependence post-Fukushima.Google, Cisco, and Dell stand out or sourcing over 20% renewable energy globally or each company’s inrastructure.
ExEcutivE Summary
Oera ScoresCopa RakiScore
1st
53
2nd
49
3rd
48
3rd
48
5th
45
6th
Alcatel-Lucent
40
7th
38
7th
38
9th
35
10th
34
11th
33
12th
29
13th
25
13th
23
15th
22
16th
21
17th
19
18th
15
19th
11
19th
11
21st
10
IT technologies have the potential to transorm the way we use energy, breakingour dependence on dirty sources o energy. By developing technology thatallows users to monitor and prevent greenhouse gas emissions rom everydayactivities, ICT companies can provide society with solutions to phase out ossiluels and drive the necessary changes needed to mitigate climate changeimpacts. The industry is continuing to progress on these solutions, but at apace that does not meet the urgency o the climate crisis.ICT companies eatured on the Leaderboard repeatedly express in their owncorporate sustainability reports, websites and executives’ public speeches theimportance o the industry’s leadership in reducing emissions and preventingdevastating climate change, but most have proven shy in disclosing investmentsand uture savings goals. The industry’s disclosure problem is an impedimentto pushing the industry past current perormance towards creating level playingelds that will spur aster innovation.Fujitsu, Ericsson and Cisco continue to remain in the top tier o companiesin driving ICT solutions providing comprehensive case studies that includewell ounded assumptions with pre- and post-intervention data on the energyand pollution savings potential o their solutions. Global telecommunicationsoperators such as Vodaone and NTT also scored relatively well in solutionsleadership, in the rst Leaderboard evaluation. The level o disclosure o investment in emission reducing solutions isdisappointing. The level o disclosure o investment is oten in contrast with howimportant companies portray solutions to climate change. For example, Dellcontinues to make the importance o the global reduction o greenhouse gasemissions a company ocus, but ails to communicate any real details o how itsbusiness model invests in new technology to secure these meaningul reductions. The scoring or the Solutions section was modied in this edition o theLeaderboard. Current savings calculations criterion has been lowered to 10points rom 20 points while at the same time both the investment and uturesavings goals criterion were increased to 10 points rom 5 points. Thesechanges were made to give greater leadership recognition to those companiesthat were attaching signicant resources and ambition to their eorts to driveclean energy deployment, as their solutions oerings become more mature andmethodology or measuring such reduction becomes standardised.
Solutions Highlights:Current Savings Calculations
- Cisco (10 out o 10 points) - Cisco has made public several detailedcase studies that highlight how innovation technology is able to reduce emissions. Cisco provides threecomprehensive case studies as well as a video on the company’sEnergyWisesolution.
Investment
- Google (9 out o 10 points) - Google’s clean energy investments stand out among the crowd.In addition to investing in new emerging clean energy start ups, Google is investing in utility projects to createrenewable energy, including alarge scale solar project near Sacramento, Caliornia.
Future Savings Goal
- Fujitsu (5 out o 10 points) - Fujitsu has established a goal o reducing cumulative carbonemissions by 15m tonnes between 2009 and 2012. The company also set a goal o reducing emissions in Japan by30m tonnes by FY 2020.
IT Ciate Sotios ScoresCopa RakiScore
1st
28
2nd
24
3rd
22
4th
21
5th
19
5th
19
5th
19
8th
17
9th
16
10th
15
11th
14
12th
13
13th
11
14th
10
15th
9
16th
7
17th
5
17th
5
19th
4
20th
3
20th
3
it cLimatE SoLutionS
 
45
2
2
2
it EnErGy imPact
9
8
5
5
5
5
4
4
2
 3
. Equipment Manufacturing (Dell, HP, Sharp, Wipro, HCL) & Network Companies (Alcatel-Lucent, Cisco,Ericsson)
Highly energy ecient ICT products, whether they are or consumer or or the business sector, can have a signicantimpact on the amount o energy our online products demand. In addition, the supply chain is heavily concentratedin countries in Southeast Asia, and are oten driving signicant investment in dirty energy supply to manuacturethese products. Many companies included in the Cool IT Leaderboard are beginning to actively manage greenhousegas emissions in dierent stages o the supply chain, such as in the manuacturing and use stages. The Leaderboard awards top marks to companies that report veried emissions up to or exceeding 80% o theembedded energy in their supply chain and/or have manuactured products that signicantly meet or exceedestablished energy eciency standards. The highest scoring companies in this criterion include, HP, Dell and Sharp.More IT companies should showcase any eciency targets or existing eciency work among their suppliers toestablish energy reduction in their supply chain.For additional comparative analysis on the environmental and clean energy perormance o major consumerelectronic manuactures, please see
.Greenpeace released its own report,
in Marcho 2010, highlighting the scale o IT’s estimated energy consumption, and providing new analysis on the projected growthin energy consumption o the internet and cloud computing or the coming decade, particularly as driven by data centres.Key ndings and outstanding questions rom the Make IT Green report include:
•Theelectricityconsumptionofdatacentresmaybeasmuchas70%higherthanpreviouslypredicted.•Thecombinedelectricitydemandoftheinternet/cloud(datacentresandtelecommunicationsnetwork)globallyis
623bn kWh (and would rank 5th among countries).
•Basedoncurrentprojections,thedemandforelectricitywillmorethantripleto1,973bnkWh,anamountgreater
than the combined total demands o France, Germany, Canada and Brazil.
,, ,, .:..,, ,, ,.USChinaRussiaJapanCloud computingIndiaGermanyCanadaFranceBrazilUK 
01000 2000 3000 4000 5000
2007electricityconsumption.BillionkwH
3923
34381023925623568547536447404345
 The International Energy Agency (IEA) warned in all2011that unless a decisive shit is made to clean energy investmentand move away rom high carbon sources o energy, such as coal, in the next ve years (2017), the Earth will be lockedinto a disastrous level o unavoidable global warming. Electronic devices and the network that supports our demandor greater online access are a signicant orce in driving global energy demand. While many brands are making stepsto manage and reduce pollution by increasing eciency in their products and operations, only a ew companies havedemonstrated a signicant commitment to meeting their growing electricity needs rom renewable sources.

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