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Quicklet on Charles Duhigg's The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

Quicklet on Charles Duhigg's The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business

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Published by Hyperink
Charles Duhigg was a reporter in Iraq a decade ago when he heard about an army major who was analyzing videotapes of riots. He wanted to see if he could detect any patterns that might help him stop the riots before they began. He did.

First, a small crowd would gather in a plaza. Within a few hours, they would begin to chant angry slogans. Spectators would show up. Food vendors would arrive. Time would pass. The chanting would get louder. More time would pass. The spectators would remain in a relatively small space, except around dusk when they got hungry. They’d buy some food, then return to their original spot.

That was the pattern for most, but there were some who would march into the middle of the crowd, back out to the edge, back to the middle. Those were the troublemakers. One would throw a bottle, another would throw a rock. Within 15 minutes, there would be a full-scale riot.

The major told Duhigg that after observing this pattern, he scheduled a meeting with the town’s mayor. He made what must have seemed like an odd request. Would it be possible for the police to keep food vendors out of the plazas?
Charles Duhigg was a reporter in Iraq a decade ago when he heard about an army major who was analyzing videotapes of riots. He wanted to see if he could detect any patterns that might help him stop the riots before they began. He did.

First, a small crowd would gather in a plaza. Within a few hours, they would begin to chant angry slogans. Spectators would show up. Food vendors would arrive. Time would pass. The chanting would get louder. More time would pass. The spectators would remain in a relatively small space, except around dusk when they got hungry. They’d buy some food, then return to their original spot.

That was the pattern for most, but there were some who would march into the middle of the crowd, back out to the edge, back to the middle. Those were the troublemakers. One would throw a bottle, another would throw a rock. Within 15 minutes, there would be a full-scale riot.

The major told Duhigg that after observing this pattern, he scheduled a meeting with the town’s mayor. He made what must have seemed like an odd request. Would it be possible for the police to keep food vendors out of the plazas?

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Published by: Hyperink on Oct 21, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved
List Price: $2.99

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