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Indian Weekender #87

Indian Weekender #87

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Published by: Indian Weekender on Oct 21, 2012
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W
estfield Manu
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Indian
Oco 19,2012 Volm 4, No. 13FOr Free distributiON
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 New Zealand’s frst Indian weekend magazine
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We couldn’t have had a better example of music transcending lan-guages and cultures than seeingthe musician father-daughter duoYempee (better known as Antony)and Diya Antony strum their guitarsto a string of golden hits by Moham-
mad Ra and Kishore Kumar at the
“Old is Gold” concert in Aucklandlast month.It was fascinating to watch thetwo guitarists perform effortlessly
to numbers like Na Ja Kahin Ab
 Na Ja and Main Hoon Jhum JhumJhumroo, despite Hindi being aliento both of them.“I can’t understand Hindi nor does my daughter but we can play inany language. If we like the music,we play it,” says Antony, who moved
to Auckland in 2003, from Kerala.
A resident of New Lynn, Antonyhas been performing with his daugh-ter, Diya, at various concerts inAuckland, ranging from Hindi andTamil to Sri Lankan ones, from the past few years. While Antony takesthe lead, Diya provides middle easyleads to her father “to give him moreeffect”.It’s been eight years since this14-year-old has been playing guitar and she owes her musician skills toher father.“It is because of his teachings thatI have been able to reach this level.I wasn’t interested in guitar when Istarted off but have gradually devel-oped interest over the years becauseof his encouragement to learn theinstrument,” said Diya, who is also astudent of the New Zealand ModernSchool of Music.
Musically yours
 
ArwA JANJAli
Picture: Moumita Chatterjee
Music is pretty much in the bloodof this family – while Diya andAntony play the guitar, her younger sister plays the piano.“I have been playing guitar since14 to15 years and have just picked uphow to play from my own interest,”says Antony“I didn’t get the opportunity tolearn music in a systematic way as Iwas born and brought up in a smallvillage, where there were no teachers.Hence, I am coaching my daughters by sending them to a music school.I want them to learn music in a me-thodical way by knowing how to readnotes, etc,” says Antony.A former lead guitarist of theAuckland band Swarangal, Antonyworks in the Ministry of Primary In-dustries for a living and dedicates hisspare time to perform in concerts.
“With work, it gets difcult
though as it easily takes two to threemonths to prepare for a concert,” hereveals. But no matter what, he makessure to keep the interest for musicalive in his daughters. Thanks to her frequent performances at concertswith Antony, Diya not just enjoys oldHindi numbers but prefers the currentHindi songs to English ones.“In Western music, I like fast paced numbers but when it comes toguitar, it’s mainly Hindi songs for me.I like singers Chitra and Shweta. Butfor shows, I listen to old songs,” saysthe teenager, who intends to keepmusic as a hobby and make medicineher profession.As for her daddy dearest, it’sPankaj Udhas all the way. “I enjoyPankaj Udhas’ music,” says Antony.
I didn’t get the opportunity to learn music in a systematicway as I was born and brought up in a small village, wherethere were no teachers. Hence, I am coaching my daughtersby sending them to a music school. - Antony
 
indan wnd | Octob 19, 2012
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Two members of the Indian commu-nity have been appointed to the Filmand Labelling Review Body.
Veer Khar and Dr Paramjeet
Parmar were listed in an eight-mem- ber panel announced by the InternalAffairs Minister Chris Tremain re-cently.The appointees are required tohelp ensure that the interests of thegeneral public are taken into accountin the labelling of 
lms.
“Community Rep-resentatives comefrom a range of back-grounds and ages.Together they offer adepth of understand-ing of New Zealand perspectives, ways of life and beliefs, whichcontribute to the appropriate label-
ling of lms available for reviewing
 by New Zealanders,” Mr Tremainsaid.The Labelling Body issues labels
to all lms supplied to the public andrates unrestricted lms. Community
representatives assist the LabellingBody, as required, in carrying outday-to-day activities of rating and
issuing labels for lms, videos and
DVDs.The appointees are: Denise
Ewe, Veer Khar, Pe Kingi, Joseph
Liava’a, David Lui, Shana Malio,George Ngatai and Dr ParmjeetParmar.
Veer Khar in addition to being
a professional engineer, has a back-ground in International Relationsand Human Rights.As general secretary of NewZealand Indian Association (2007-10); he not only project managed publishing of community initi-ated “Historical Book” about ‘EarlySettlers’ from South Asia in NewZealand butalso started the process of ana-lytical, intuitiveand result drivenengagementthrough submis-sions and regular interaction with policy makers on behalf of the com-munity.He has been instrumental indevising strategies and arrangedfunding for effective functioning of community organisations and con-sistently ensured provision of thehighest standard of service and in-tegrity of volunteers.Dr Parmar, who holds a PhDin Biological Sciences, is a broad-caster with local radio station RadioTarana.Community representativesap- pointment terms are on-going butreviewed at least once every threeyears.
Khar, Parmar named
in lm review body
As Western economies ounder,
emerging countries like India andChina are projected to become ever more dominant.In order to survive, Dr ReubenAbraham, of the Indian School of Business, says New Zealand needsto make the most of any opportu-nities this growthoffers.Dr Abraham, ex-ecutive director of thecentre for EmergingMarkets at the IndianBusiness School, saidall business oppor-tunities for the next50 to 100 years weregoing to come out of India and China.
“Kiwi businesses
 just have to adjust tothe fact that this ischaotic and you justhave to live with itand just go out thereand get things done,”he told TV3’s First-line recently.Dr Abraham said New Zealandneeded to make more of its tourismopportunities, as 150,000 Indiantourists travelled to Australia lastyear.He had earlier addressed a NZ-India International ConnectionsSeminar in Auckland.Introducing Dr Abraham, India- NZ Business Council chairmanWenceslaus Anthony spoke of the New Zealand Government’s plans.“The Government has an ambi-tious goal for New Zealand – to in-crease the ratio of exports to GDPfrom the current 30% to 40% by2025. “Thus it is a call to our busi-nesses to develop more internation-ally competitive businesses it is also
clear that we need to lift the proleof Kiwi businesses in international
markets.“We need to tell the ‘NewZealand Story’- We need to see the‘New Zealand Story’ used by NewZealand businesses to build greater  brand recognition and demand for our goods and services overseas. For exporters to be successful they needto be competitive,” Mr Anthonysaid. “Businesses are looking for op- portunities in the global scenario.“This might becapturing value fromdesign expertise andintellectual property,or at the distribution or retail end of the chain.“Or it might be dif-ferent ways of doing business such as jointventures or inward or outward direct invest-ments,” Mr Anthonysaid.“Our expertise inniche areas – in bothcommodity and other high-value technolo-gy-based sectors – isstrength.“NZ has a diasporaoffshore, including
many inuential and well-connected
 New Zealanders who remain com-mitted to enhancing New Zealand’seconomic interests. The challengefor us all – business and Govern-ment – is to grasp these opportuni-
ties for the benet of New Zealand,”
Mr Anthony said.
Make more of opportunities,
NZ businesses told
Veer KharDr ParmaDr. Reuben Abraham

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