Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Listening Cure

Listening Cure

Ratings: (0)|Views: 13|Likes:
Published by Larry Mynatt
Equinox Magazine May 1997
Does your child have trouble learning? Is your boss constantly interrupting you? Are you searching for a way to live life more fully? The answers, according to the Tomatis Method, are all in the ears.

The Listening Cure
Article by Nicholas Regush with photography by Jeff Speed

The usual sonic mayhem of downtown Toronto seems particularly acute on a cold and crisp December morning. It is the kind of day when the air does little to filter out squealing brakes, distant ye
Equinox Magazine May 1997
Does your child have trouble learning? Is your boss constantly interrupting you? Are you searching for a way to live life more fully? The answers, according to the Tomatis Method, are all in the ears.

The Listening Cure
Article by Nicholas Regush with photography by Jeff Speed

The usual sonic mayhem of downtown Toronto seems particularly acute on a cold and crisp December morning. It is the kind of day when the air does little to filter out squealing brakes, distant ye

More info:

Published by: Larry Mynatt on Oct 24, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/23/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Te Listening Centre 599 Maram St., Toronto, ON, M6G 2L7, Te: 416 588-4136, E-mai: isteniirect.com
Equinox MagazineMay 997
Does your ci ave troue earning? Is your oss constanty interrupting you? Are you searcing or away to live life more fully? The answers, according to the Tomatis Method, are all in the ears.
The Listening Cure
 Artice y Nicoas Reguswith photography by Jeff Speed
The usual sonic mayhem of down-town Toronto seems particularlyacute on a co an crisp Decemermorning. It is te in o ay wenthe air does little to filter out squeal-ing brakes, distant yells, rumblingstreetcars, even traffic lights changingcoours; a ay wen you reaize justhow deadened the human ear nor-mally is to the urban grinder. It is in just tis maestrom, in a quaint anceeru tree-storey ric Victorianuiing, tat ciren an autsare tuning their bodies to the world.The bright, childlike drawings andte gigges o active youngsters com-ing rom various rooms o itte toprepare a visitor for what is reallyhappening. Here, the human ear isbeing moulded into a powerful toolo transormation.In one room on te main oor, a6-year-old boy with a reputationas a schoolyard bully bounces ona small trampoline while wearingeapones tat seem to swaow isea. One igt up, a younger oywho has had difficulty relating to hisparents wears similar headgear whileying quiety on a mat istening to temusic o Mozart.Toying wit istening tecnoogy, young an o are tune to te wor at Torontos Listening Centre.Director Paul Madaule teaches actor Gisele Rousseau how to vocalize with greater precision.
 
Te Listening Centre 599 Maram St., Toronto, ON, M6G 2L7, Te: 416 588-4136, E-mai: isteniirect.com
2
ext door in the adult room, an opera singereas a iretto into a micropone, ouy anwit great vigour, an receives eeac o erown voice. Neary, a moter recors a ae tatwill be specially processed electronically for hergrade-school daughter, who has serious speechmpeiments, to isten to. Trougout te ay,oters wi venture to Te Listening Centre orheir own voyage in sound stimulation and audi-ory training. It is all designed to reawaken theear and body and even the desire to embrace life.oronto’s Listening Centre is one of the largestan most respecte o more tan 200 aciitiesworldwide that are based on the so-called Toma-tis Method, a rather unorthodox view of how the ear works. The idea was developed in the early 1950sby Alfred Tomatis, a French ear, nose, and throat specialist who described a highly active role for the ear,a unction tat compemente te rains wor.In a ey eparture rom te traitiona neuropysioogy o te ear, Tomatis istinguise etween ear-ing an istening. To ear, e caime, is to perceive soun. To isten is to tune tose souns seectivey,an all-encompassing process that shapes our connections to the world around us. In this light, it is pos-sible to hear sounds but not attend to them. While people might actually hear well, they could still haveistening proems rougt on y a range o psycoogica stresses.Tomatis was convince tat istening i cuties, especiay among ciren, e to speec an anguageimpairment, earning isaiities, ac o concentration an aertness, te tenency to interrupt oters,depression, and even severe withdrawal, such as in the case of autism. It was quite the proposition, con-sidering that traditional medicine had viewed the ear essentially as a receiver piping sounds to the brain,were te processing an rea perceptua wor occurre.By te mi-1950s, Tomatis a evise a meto to treat tese types o proems y correcting pooristening. It invove use o a evice, ue te Eectronic Ear, tat emits various soun requen-cies, or ranges, to stimulate and train the ear to listen more effectively. He claimed the method not onlyimproved the quality of the voice and language and organizational skills but also helped reenergize therain. An since te inner ear is cosey associate wit aance an movement, is soun-stimuationapproac wou aso improve posture an coorination.I true, it meant amost anyone cou ene t rom te Tomatis Meto - rom tose suering rom amild to severe breakdown in communication to those simply desiring a listening tune-up. A story often told about Tomatis by his advocates is how he managed to give a new lease on life to agroup of Benedictine monks who had “lost their spirit.” In the mid-1960s, the monks at a French abbeyin te sout o France were suering rom extreme atigue an epression. Various meica prescrip-tions, suc as a cange in iet, meications, an a vitamin regimen, a prove utie. Seeping ongerhours only made matters worse.
 
Te Listening Centre 599 Maram St., Toronto, ON, M6G 2L7, Te: 416 588-4136, E-mai: isteniirect.com
3
The monks asked Tomatis, who hadvisite te aey, to return to conuctis own meica investigation.Tomatisquicy etermine tat proems egansoon after they had followed a 1960 Vatican directive prohibiting the use of Latin in reigious services an stoppepractising Gregorian cants. Te monshad already been living a very quiet lifeand were, he reasoned, shutting outeven more soun stimuation to terain. As te story goes, Tomatis rein-trouce Gregorian cants into te aiylife of the depressed monks. Most of themonks soon regained their physical andspiritua eat.It was tis vignette tat rst rew meto omatis. As a newspaper reporteron the lookout for new ideas, I madearrangements to interview him when heset up temporary sop in Montrea inte mi-1970s as part o is pan to estais centres in Nort America tat wou appy is ear-trainingmethods.Initially, during our meeting, Tomatis was no nonsense and scarcely broke into a smile. His head shaved,he sat rigidly in a straight-back chair and appeared more monk than physician. He eventually warmed ashe related the events that led him to a radical vision of how the ear is at the very centre of human func-tioning.Tomatiss voyage o iscovery egan wit oservations e mae in meica practice aout opera singerswho needed treatment to overcome vocal difficulties. To understand why they were having problems,he took a cue from a study he had conducted for the French government in the late 1940s on how noisecan affect hearing: he had noted that factory workers with hearing loss suffered some distortions inteir voices. Was tere a in etween earing an vocaizing? Wen e gave is voice-troue sing-ers auiograms to measure teir aiity to ear souns, tey, too, sowe signs o earing oss, eainghim to reason that it was likely due to “noise” from their own voices. After all, an opera singer such asthe famed Maria Callas, who was a Tomatis patient, could belt out as many as 130 decibels of sound,comparae to te noise you wou ear wie staning near jet engines. Wen Tomatis teste urtery ocing singersrigt ears wie tey perorme (omaring tem wit noise or cutting o soun,he noticed that their voices began to break down. It was another clue that voice and hearing are inextri-cably linked. Hence, his famous principle that became known as the Tomatis Effect: If you cannot hear asound, you will not be capable of singing it or, for that matter, speaking it.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->