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10.25.12 The Crimson White

10.25.12 The Crimson White

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The Crimson White is a student published newspaper that seeks to inform the University of Alabama and the surrounding community. Roll Tide.
The Crimson White is a student published newspaper that seeks to inform the University of Alabama and the surrounding community. Roll Tide.

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Thursday, October 25, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 45
 
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        •
Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................8
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .....................13Puzzles ....................17Classifieds .............. 17
Partlycloudy
81º/61º
Friday 82º/54º
Partly cloudy
 
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NE WS
 |  HOM ECOM I NG
By Adrienne Burch
Staff Reporter
On a late October afternoon 62years ago, Janice Garrison stoodon the sideline in Bryant-DennyStadium watching the MississippiState University Famous MaroonBand perform as she waited tobe crowned the 1950 Universityof Alabama Homecoming Queen.The band played song after song.Halftime ended, but Garrisonstill waited.“The band took too long,” shesaid. “I never got my crown.”It was supposed to be an emer-ald- and diamond-encrusted tiarashipped all the way from New YorkCity, Garrison said. But she nevereven saw it. Garrison is now 81years old and goes by the nameof Janice Stracener after mar-rying her now-deceased secondhusband. She will return to cam-pus this Saturday to ride in the2012 Homecoming Parade, whereshe will finally be given the spot-light she was meant to receive 62years ago.In 1950, Stracener was nominat-ed for queen by Alpha Chi Omegasorority as a freshman. She wentup against 46 other women andwon the top honor.“It was quite an experience,”Stracener said. “There were somany other girls in the contest,and I came up first.”In the 1950 Homecoming gamewhere Stracener was supposedto be crowned, the Crimson Tideplayed Mississippi State in theBattle for Highway 82. This year’sHomecoming game, where she willmake an appearance, will high-light a modern version of the samerivalry, with both teams fighting tokeep an undefeated record.
NEWS
| TUITION
NEWS
| HOMECOMING
NEWS
| CAMPUS INTERNET
Woman to receivelong-awaited crown
SEE
HOMECOMING
PAGE 6
By Madison Roberts
Staff Reporter
Homecoming at TheUniversity of Alabama is aweek-long display of school spir-it, from the daily sporting andartistic competitions betweensororities and student orga-nizations to the HomecomingParade. However, the cam-pus-wide lawn decorationcompetition holds much of thetradition of the annual event.Lawn decorations consist of a process called pomping, inwhich tissue paper of differ-ent colors is rolled into balls of different sizes and, eventually,glued to a cardboard design orstuck through chicken wire.The end result is a mosaic-like structure that attemptsto convey the University’sHomecoming theme, “TimelessTraditions.”
Sororities, clubsdedicate hours,keep traditions
Groups show schoolspirit through pomp
SEE
POMPING
PAGE 6
By Adam Mills
Staff Reporter
With the exception of a fewstates, funding for public uni-versities across the countryhas been in sharp decline forseveral years, forcing hikes intuition across the nation. TheUniversity of Alabama is by nomeans unaffected.“Over the last four years,UA’s state appropriation hasbeen cut by about $60 million,”said Cathy Andreen, direc-tor of media relations for theUniversity. “UA’s funding comesprimarily from state appropria-tions, tuition and fees, contractsand grants, and private giving.”She said the University hascontinued operations in theface of shrinking sums appro-priated by state lawmakers.“Despite cuts in our stateappropriations every year since2008, we continue to use ourresources effectively and effi-ciently,” Andreen said. “As aresult, we have not reduced thenumber of students we accept;students have full access to theclasses they need to graduate;we are fully staffed to meet stu-dent expectations; and classesare taught by fully qualifiedfaculty.”Andreen said the Universityhas carefully responded to thedecrease in state funding byreorganizing budget percentag-es and increasing enrollment,saving the University frommajor layoffs or program cuts.“UA has absorbed the reduc-tion in state appropriationswithout laying off any faculty orstaff or cutting any programs,”Andreen said.But the decrease in fundinghasn’t come without conse-quences such as tuition hikes.“Tuition increases are basedon the resources the Universityneeds to be able to continue toprovide the high-quality educa-tional experiences our studentsand their parents expect,”Andreen said.In an interview with TheCrimson White on Oct. 12, UAPresident Guy Bailey said thetuition increases have been adirect response to state fund-ing dropping over the lastfew years.
UA not dependent on state funding
By Sarah Elizabeth Tooker 
Staff Reporter
The University of Alabama’sOffice of InformationTechnology recently added asecure wireless network forstudents. however, its addi-tion was prompted more forbasic security measures thanoverall faster connectivity,Vice Provost John McGowansaid.“Wireless networkingpresents a real and uniqueset of security challenges,”McGowan said. “In general,though, cases of abuse of open wireless networks arecommonplace and so there isno reason to think we wouldbe safe from it.”In the past, students havebeen forced to connect withthese open wireless net-works like UA Public andUA ResNet. This gives unau-thorized users the ability toeavesdrop and capture sensi-tive information such as pass-words and credit card num-bers, McGowan said.The new secure network,UA-WPA-PSK, is protectedwith a password that usersmust provide to gain initialaccess.“WPA-PSK is easy forusers to set up and use andyet provides a reasonablelevel of encryption and somebasic access control from thenetwork,” he said.Some students, uponreceiving the University’semail Monday introducingthe new network, thoughtthis meant Internet connec-tion on campus would subse-quently improve.Elie Zeitouni, a freshmanmajoring in managementinformation systems, firsttested the network in AlstonHall and was pleased when hecompared connection speedsof older networks usingspeedtest.com, a public web-site used to measure Internetconnection speed.“The download speeds forthe old networks were steadyat 10 megabits per second andthe upload speed was consis-tent with one megabit persecond,” Zeitouni said. “Thenew network reached speedsthat averaged at 40 megabitsper second for both downloadand upload.”
New wireless network faster, more secure
ResNet, UA Publicdeemed vulnerableBailey explains howUA has handled cuts
SEE
FUNDING
PAGE 17SEE
WIRELESS
PAGE 17
 C W  |  S a r a h  G r a c e  M o o r e h e a d,  W h i t n e y  H e n d r i x,  C W  F i l e
CW | Cora Lindholm
member of Gamma Phi Beta pomps for the sorority’s Homecomingdisplay.
News.
Delivered.
Page 11
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
LUNCH
SteakBroccoli Cheddar SpudGreen BeansCorn on the CobbFresh Tomato Basil PenneBroccoli & Cheddar StrataSautéed Mushroom(Vegetarian)
LUNCH
Chicken ParmesanSpaghetti with Meat SauceBeef Stroganoff Pumpkin Coconut BisquePasta ZitiSeasoned CornItalian Green beans(Vegetarian)
FRESH FOOD
LUNCH
Roasted Pork LoinGrilled Chicken HerbSandwichSeafood SaladPolenta with Broccoli RabeMashed Red PotatoesDeep Fried OkraTurnip Greens (Vegetarian)
DINNER
BBQ Smoked Turkey LegBeef BrisketTurkey BreastWild Mushroom PizzaWhite RiceBaked Macaroni & CheeseBlack-Eyed Peas(Vegetarian)
ON THE MENU
DINNER
Pork with CaramelizedOnion GravyChicken BurritoCavatappi Marinara withArugulaDeep Fried OkraRoasted Corn & Potato SoupGarden Burger Taco(Vegetarian)
LAKESIDEFRIDAY 
 What:
Thornton Willis:Structural Abstraction
 Where:
103 Sarah MoodyGallery of Art in GarlandHall
 When:
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
 What:
Manderson GraduateSchool of Business OpenHouse
 Where:
100 Business Hall of Fame Bidgood Hall
 When:
1 p.m.-4 p.m.
 What:
Homecoming PepRally/Bonfire
 Where:
The Quad
 When:
7 p.m.
TODAY 
 What:
Exotic Food TastingTrip
 Where:
200 B.B. Comer Hall
 When:
2:30-4 p.m.
 What:
CLC Movie Nights:‘Children of Heaven’
 Where:
241 B.B. Comer Hall
 When:
6:30-8:30 p.m.
 What:
University of AlabamaTrombone Choir and Octet
 Where:
Concert Hall inMoody Music Building
 When:
7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY 
 What:
Homecoming Parade
 When:
2 p.m.
 What:
Alabama vsMississippi State
 Where:
Bryant-DennyStadium
 When:
7:30 p.m.
 What:
Rocky Horror PictureShow
 Where:
Bama Theatre
 When:
7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m.
ON THE RADAR 
GO
GO
Page 2• Thursday,October 25, 2012
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036Advertising: 348-7845Classifieds: 348-7355
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Special Projects Managerosmspecialprojects@gmail.com
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348-8042Creative Services Manager
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osmspecialprojects2@gmail.com
 Will Tucker
editor-in-chiefeditor@cw.ua.edu
 Ashley Chaffin
managing editor
Stephen Dethrage
production editor
Mackenzie Brown
visuals editor
Daniel Roth
online editor
Melissa Brown
news editornewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Lauren Ferguson
culture editor
Marquavius Burnett
sports editor
SoRelle Wyckoff
opinion editor
 Ashanka Kumari 
chief copy editor
Shannon Auvil
photo editor
 Anna Waters
lead designer
 Whitney Hendrix 
lead graphic designer
 Alex Clark 
community manager
 
Daniel Roth 
magazine editor
FOLLOW US ONTWITTER@THECRIMSONWHITE VISIT US ONLINE ATCW.UA.EDU
BURKE
From MCT Campus
WASHINGTON—Democrats seizedWednesday on a RepublicanSenate candidate’s com-ments about pregnancy,looking to regain an upperhand with female vot-ers not only in that state,but also in the nationwidepresidential campaign.The candidate, RichardMourdock of Indiana, apolo-gized Wednesday for whathe called the awkwardnessof his remarks, in whichhe defended his oppositionto abortion in most casesby saying that even preg-nancy caused by rape isthe will of God. Democratscriticized him, saying theremarks were demeaning towomen and working to con-vince women to turn awayfrom Mourdock as well asRepublican presidential can-didate Mitt Romney.The brouhaha came asboth parties wage a high-stakes contest for the sup-port of female voters, afight given new urgency asDemocrats have lost theirbig lead among womenand consequently foundPresident Barack Obama ina neck-and neck-fight for thepresidency.It was unclear whetherDemocrats would be able toregain their historic advan-tage nationally amongwomen. Last-minute con-troversies have a history of affecting close races, but thistime most voters alreadyhave decided on their can-didates. The controversy’simpact on persuadable vot-ers could depend on howlong the story survives.“Is this likely to affect alot of voters? I’m skeptical,”said Peter Brown, assistantdirector of the QuinnipiacUniversity Polling Institute.The greatest impact couldcome in the Indiana Senaterace, where Mourdock isfighting to keep the seatnow held by Richard Lugarin Republican hands. “Oddsare 75 percent it will costMourdock the seat,” saidBrad Coker, the managingdirector of Mason-DixonPolling & Research. “It’sgoing to be something thatwill dominate local newsall week.”The story started in aSenate debate Tuesday nightwhen Mourdock was askedabout his opposition to abor-tion in all cases except whenthe woman’s life is in dan-ger. His opponent, Rep. JoeDonnelly, D-Ind., supportsabortion rights in cases of rape, incest or saving thewoman’s life.“I struggled with it myself for a long time,” a highlyemotional Mourdock said.“But I came to realize life
Democrats hit GOP candidate Richard Mourdock’s comments on pregnancy
is that gift from God, and Ithink even when life beginsin that horrible situationof rape, that it is some-thing that God intendedto happen.”Soon after the debate, heand his campaign worked tomake sure no one thought hewas saying that rape itself was God’s will. “God createslife, and that was my point,”a campaign statement said.“God does not want rape,and by no means was I sug-gesting that He does. Rape isa horrible thing, and for any-one to twist my words other-wise is absurd and sick.”On Wednesday, Mourdockapologized for giving theimpression to anyone thathe condoned rape or thathe thought God condonedrape. “I have certainly beenhumbled by the fact thatso many people think thatsomehow was an interpreta-tion,” he said. “I absolutelyabhor violence. I abhor anykind of sexual violence. I amabsolutely convinced thatthe God I worship abhorsviolence.”Romney, who’s endorsedMourdock and appears in aTV ad for him that startedairing Monday, distancedhimself from Mourdock’sremarks.“Gov. Romney disagreeswith Richard Mourdock’scomments, and they do notreflect his views,” spokes-woman Andrea Saul said.Romney opposes abor-tion rights, but does sup-port exceptions in cases of rape, incest or to save thewoman’s life.He didn’t withdrawhis endorsement or askthat the ad featuring hisendorsement be pulled fromIndiana’s airwaves.Democrats hit Mourdockand Romney withinmoments of the debate andcontinued Wednesday.“The president felt thosecomments were outrageousand demeaning to women,”Obama campaign spokes-woman Jen Psaki saidWednesday, raising the sub- ject herself when reportersdidn’t ask about it. “This is areminder that a RepublicanCongress working with aRepublican president MittRomney would (feel) thatwomen should not be ableto make choices about theirown health care.”“National Republicanscannot paper over RichardMourdock’s heinous viewson rape. Enough is enough,”added Sen. Patty Murray,D-Wash, the chair of theDemocratic SenatorialCampaign Committee.The DemocraticCongressional CampaignCommittee, the politicaloperation for the party’sHouse of Representativescandidates, worked to gen-erate traffic on Twitter tospread the story and keep italive.Democrats also hopedthat the Mourdock remarkswould cause the same con-troversy as remarks ear-lier this year by RepublicanSenate candidate Todd Akinin Missouri. Akin, a Missouricongressman, set off a fire-storm when he explained hisopposition to abortion rightseven in cases of rape by say-ing it was rare for a womanto get pregnant if she reallywere raped.Republican leaders,including Romney, dis-tanced themselves fromAkin.In this case, Republicanleaders and their allies werefirm Wednesday in lining upbehind Mourdock.“Richard and I, along withmillions of Americans –including even Joe Donnelly– believe that life is a giftfrom God. To try and con-strue his words as anythingother than a restatement of that belief is irresponsibleand ridiculous,” said Sen.John Cornyn, R-Texas, thechairman of the NationalRepublican SenatorialCommittee.“Richard Mourdock saidthat life is always a gift fromGod, and we couldn’t agreemore. To report his state-ment as an endorsement of rape is either willfully igno-rant or malicious,” addedMarjorie Dannenfelser, thepresident of the conserva-tive Susan B. Anthony List.The major Western reli-gions take varying positionson abortion.“The Catholic Church’sposition is that direct abor-tion is the killing of an inno-cent life. However tragic,there are no exceptions tothis position, even to savethe life of the mother,” saidKarey Harwood, an associ-ate professor of religiousstudies at North CarolinaState University. “TheJewish and Protestant posi-tions are too internallydiverse to summarize assingular positions.”

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BAMA’S WINNING MARGIN IS YOUR DISCOUNT!
If Bama wins by 30 points, then your discount is 30%...If Bama wins by 12 points, then your discount is 12%...OFF OF EVERYTHING IN THE STORE!
(Excludes “Sale” items)
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Minimum discount is 5% and maximum is 30% .(SUNDAY ONLY)
 
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Thursday, October 25, 2012
N
E
 W 
S
N
EWS
O
PINION
C
ULTURE
S
PORTS
Page 3
CW Staff 
University of Alabamanterfraternity Council organiza-ions have begun work to launchnvestigations regarding theniversity administration’s Oct.8 cancellation of pledgeship.At 12:30 p.m. on Thursday, Oct.8, Assistant Dean of Studentsowell Davis announced to theFC fraternity presidents theermination of all pledge activi-ies by 1 p.m. that day. Later, Viceresident of Student Affairs Markelson hosted a press conferencet 4 p.m., detailing the decision asresult of hazing hotline calls.“It is very difficult to investigateases of hazing that are reportedhrough anonymous sourceshat are vague,” Nelson said athe conference on Oct. 18. “Thesources that have come in thisweek have been very specific andhave enabled usto take swifteraction.”Currently, theUniversity is incommunicationwith nationalchapters of IFCfraternities toconduct separateinvestigationsinto the valid-ity of the accusa-tions, said CathyAndreen, directorof media relationsat The University of Alabama.“The office of student affairswill work with any national fra-ternity organization that wantsto do an investigation of a UAchapter. Some nationals do theirown investigations, some defer tothe University,and, in somecases, theUniversity andthe nationalwork together,”she said.Nelsonnoted Pi KappaAlpha’s involve-ment in off-campus hazingallegations.University sus-pensions havebeen issued totwo active members and one for-mer member of the fraternity, pro-hibiting the students from attend-ing classes or participating in UAactivities, Nelson stated in a pressrelease on Oct. 18. Additionally,the University revoked the frater-nity’s social functions and footballblock seating for the remainder of the fall.“The parameters of an internalinvestigation are that the interna-tional fraternity and Universityare working in a collaborativepartnership to determine whator if the chapter was at fault,”said Justin D. True, director of communications and marketingof the national Pi Kappa Alphafraternity.The national organization hasissued cease and desist require-ments for the local chapter.“Cease and desist means thechapter cannot currently operateor hold any active member or newmember meetings,” True said.“The commonality of internalinvestigations and/or cease anddesist depend upon the numberof judicial violations the inter-national fraternity receives in agiven year.”Sigma Nu, Kappa Alpha Orderand Kappa Sigma were all clearedof University accusations of haz-ing in Nelson’s press release.However, the fraternities areaware of the seriousness of theallegations.“Whenever our office becomesaware of an accusation or allega-tion of any violation of policy, wewill follow up. It really depends onthe situation as to what we do,”said Brad Beacham, executivedirector of the national Sigma Nufraternity. “The UA greek affairsdepartment communicated withchapter leaders. They determinedthere was no basis to supportthe accusation.”However, Beacham remains onthe local chapter’s side.“We have a high level of confi-dence in the level of performanceof the chapter at UA,” he said. “Itis one of our most historic andbest-performing chapters.”Nick Wilson of Kappa Sigmanational fraternity said no addi-tional investigation was need-ed after the local chapter wascleared.“We asked the district grand-master to see if there were anyviolations of our code of conduct,and there weren’t any,” Wilsonsaid. “If you look at the KappaSigma organization, only a smallminority are in any sort of disci-plinary situation, so we would sayit’s not common [to have to per-form internal investigations].”
ome fraternities’ national organizations defer to University, others look into allegations themselves
By Melissa Brown
News Editor
Jose Antonio Vargas,Pulitzer Prize-winning jour-nalist and undocumentedimmigrant advocate, will visitThe University of AlabamaMonday, Oct. 29, to discusshis documentary series “IsThis Alabama?” and advo-cacy journalism in a lecturesponsored by the Collegeof Communication andInformation Sciences.Vargas, who was part of thePulitzer Prize-winning teamthat reported on the VirginiaTech shootings in 2007,revealed he was an undocu-mented immigrant in a 2011essay for The New York TimesSunday Magazine before writ-ing a cover story for TimeMagazine on the subject inJune 2012. Vargas moved fromthe Philippines at age 12 to livewith his grandparents.Though Vargas will speakat The University of Alabama-Birmingham Tuesday onimmigration reform and pol-icy, his talk on the 29th willfocus on advocacy journalism.“We invited him to comespeak because we think stu-dents need to see that thereis more than one way to do journalism,” George Daniels,associate journalism profes-sor, said. “He is doing journal-ism, but he is doing it in a wayto make a difference.”Vargas’ “Is This Alabama?”documentary series featuresfour short videos, directedby Chris Weitz of “TwilightSaga: New Moon,” that exploreAlabama’s history of civilrights issues in addition tospeaking to Alabamians whosupport and oppose HB-56.The project’s website, isthisal-abama.org, cites the bill as“the most extreme state-levelanti-immigrant bill passed todate.”Daniels said whatever sidepeople take on the issue,there’s no doubt that journal-ists, public relations officialsand documentary filmmakersplay a role in the conversation.“Alabama is still talkingabout the political issuesthat surround immigra-tion reform,” Daniels said.“Wherever you stand onHB-56, you can acknowledgethat this is an issue very muchstill in play and has not beenresolved.”Daniels said though discus-sions of such polarized top-ics can often bring the bestand the worst out of people,he hopes Monday’s event willremain civil.“We’re hoping that theworst will steer clear of ourcampus,” Daniels said.Vargas was arrested inMinnesota on Oct. 8 for driv-ing without a valid licenseon his way to speak on a col-lege campus. Daniels said hedoesn’t expect Vargas willhave similar problems whenhe enters Alabama.“I think that that concernhas been addressed, thoughyou can’t say that nothing willever happen,” Daniels said.“But if we keep the focus onthe learning opportunity hewill offer on campus, we’renot focusing on the politicalissues. We think there is asmuch to talk about with hisdocumentary work as there iswith the political issues.”
Undocumented Pulitzer winner to discuss advocacy
The office of student affairs willwork with any national fraternityorganization that wants to doan investigation of a UA chapter.Some nationals do their owninvestigations, some defer to theUniversity, and, in some cases, theUniversity and the national worktogether.— Cathy Andreen
IF YOU GO...
What:
Vargas to speak about documentaryseries “Is this Alabama?”
When:
Monday, Oct.29 @ 7 p.m.
Where:
Gorgas 205
mmigration advocate will focus on teaching, not politics in discussion about documentary series
UA, national chapters begin hazing investigations

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