Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Traces

Traces

Ratings: (0)|Views: 447|Likes:
Published by Jorge Vargas

More info:

Published by: Jorge Vargas on Oct 27, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/10/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Vargas Museum Educational Guide
Traces 
Page 1 of 5
Traces
Imelda Cajipe Endaya 
24 April to 8 August 20103F South Wing Gallery
About the Exhibition
Traces features old and recent works of visual artist Imelda Cajipe Endaya on women, war, and peace. CajipeEndaya’s series of lithographs, chine collé and monoprints converse with archival materials and artworksfrom the Vargas Museum collection by Filipina artists such as Pacita Asuncion-Roxas, Carmen Bernabe,Erlinda Vargas, and Nena Saguil. Images of peace are interspersed with images of military weapons and toysthat seek to reject the permanence of war. These include the Philippine experience in the Second World War,the wars in Kosovo, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Text, textile, and video installations complement the works.Cajipe Endaya’s works deal with themes of cultural identity, gender, race, nation, migration, displacement,and globalization from the point of view of a Filipina visual artist. She was awarded the Centennial Honorsfor the Arts by the Republic of the Philippines in 1999. She has gained recognition in the Asia-Pacificcontemporary art world for the distinctly Filipino and female statements in her art, as well as her culturalleadership in the advocacy of women. The artist currently works in New York and Manila.
Using the Education Guide
This guide is designed to help facilitate discussions and activities on the exhibit for Humanities, Art Studies,or Fine Arts classes.It is highly encouraged that course tutors/ teachers have a pre-visit to the exhibition before the class’s actualvisit. Related topics suggested in this guide include war, women, and printmaking. The first two themesprovide activities which the teacher may select for the class depending on their pacing. Listed in the activitiesare class discussion points, topics for reflection paper, or creative activities that can be adopted during theactual or post-visit. The theme on printmaking is designed to give students an overview of printmakingtechniques and its practice in the country. A reading list for the topic is also provided for students who wishto learn more about the art form.Teachers and students may seek the assistance of the museum guide during their visit. They can provideinformation about the exhibition and may enrich the visitor’s experience through interaction.This education guide may also be reproduced.
ThemesW
AR
War is an “actual, intentional and widespread armed conflict between political communities. It implies thatstates or that which intend to become states can be involved in war. Different wars have occurred throughouthistory and continue to occur until today. International wars, such as the Second World War, broughtdestruction of lives and property; and antagonism among different states. Even within a state, however,hostilities exist and are known as civil wars. In the Philippine setting, we are familiar with armed conflict as
 
Vargas Museum Educational Guide
Traces 
Page 2 of 5
documented in the news, particularly in Mindanao. Certain groups assert their political purpose throughdestructive means, and at the mercy of innocent women, children, and other victims.A
CTIVITY I
 W
AR
G
AMES
In all wars, weaponry is an asset. The innovations in science and technology have changed the way weaponsare made and as such, it continues to become a growing, multi-billion dollar industry. Weapons productionand accumulation are being prioritized by leaders over more pressing issues, such as poverty or environmentaldegradation.1.
 
Which nations or groups have the capacity to initiate war? Write a reflection paper about the topic.Cite specific examples of wars that you have learned in history and in the news.A
CTIVITY
2T
HINKING ABOUT TOYS
 Take a look at the artist’s vitrine and see the toys inside. As children, we like to play with toys and use themas tools to re-enact scenes from everyday life. As we grow up, the notion of toys eventually becomes a part ofour psyche—ways of playing also becomes ways of thinking, or ways of doing.1.
 
As a child, which toys do you play with? Reflect on how toys have influenced your present interests.2.
 
What is the artist’s position on war? What do you think do the toy soldiers signify?A
CTIVITY
3R
E
-
COLLECTING
:
 
M
EMORY AND
T
HE
W
AR
Manila was in ruins during the Second World War. Many hospitals, churches, and establishments werebombed. Look at the video installation. These images are photographs from the Vargas Archives.1.
 
Why do you think was the video projected at the stock room instead of on a clean, spacious wall?What experience do the video and its placement elicit?2.
 
What do the photographs say about the Vargas Archives and its collector? Remember, these imageswere taken from 1941-1942. What clues does it give about how these images were taken, how thesewere acquired, and what does this imply about memory and agency?Take a look at the prints and the artist’s vitrine. Relate these with the vitrine on the Vargas women. CajipeEndaya’s works are largely shaped by her personal experiences and affinities, and yet, the exhibit relates tobroader pasts and realities as well.1.
 
List down examples of strategies implemented by both artist and curator to level personal memoryand institutional memory. Students can be asked on the ways (a) artworks and objects are presentedand (b) how meanings are produced and negotiated.
 
Vargas Museum Educational Guide
Traces 
Page 3 of 5
W
OMEN
I like my work to reflect the Filipino-Asian-Pacific woman—wife, mother, sister, daughter—gaining mobility, and fulfillment for herself as she strives to live meaningfully for others.” 
Imelda Cajipe Endaya
Stitching Paint into Collage,
2009Cajipe Endaya asserts her identity through her artworks that comment on important issues from the point ofview of a Filipina visual artist. Her works are recognized for its distinct feminine statements. She is likewiseacknowledged for her cultural leadership in the advocacy of women. Cajipe Endaya is also a member of
Kasibulan 
, a collective of women artists founded in 1987. Through exhibitions, talks, and collaborative work, thegroup challenges the stereotypes impinged by patriarchal society on women.In
Traces,
the artist’s sentiments on women intersect with the memory of the lives of Marina and Nena Vargas.The former was the first wife of Jorge B. Vargas, and the latter was his eldest daughter. Vargas was the donor ofthe museum’s collection. He served as Mayor of Manila during the Japanese Occupation, the period where thecountry was virtually at his helm. The war years were a critical time for Vargas. Marina and Nena, though not atthe limelight, had their share of significant work especially during the war.A
CTIVITY
1
 
P
ORTRAITS OF
W
OMEN
Students will be asked to bring magazines, newspapers, glue, and cartolina for collage.A stereotype is a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing.”List down some stereotypes on women. Create a collage that confronts a chosen stereotype. Explain to the classhow the group came up with the image(s).A
CTIVITY
2W
ORKING
G
IRLS
:
 
W
OMEN
S ROLES
Take a look at the vitrine of the Vargas women. Aside from the photographs, the memorabilia suggest interestsand activities of Marina and Nena. Being in a privileged position even during the war, the Vargas womeninvolved themselves in charity work. Write a reflection paper on the role of women at the time and how thisrelates to the changing roles of women in contemporary society.
P
RINTMAKING
What is PrintmakingTrace
features prints created by Imelda Cajipe Endaya. Printmaking is the process of preparing and working the flatsurface of a matrix (usually of metal, wood, or stone) upon which an image is inscribed; once the image is complete,ink is applied to the matrix, and one or more impressions are printed on paper, or on other kinds of support.Unlike a painting, the image is created first on a matrix or a plate, and not directly on the support. This processallows for multiple editions, or multiple originals. Hence, many ‘originals’ of the same image can be produced. The

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->