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gandhi_collected works vol 44

gandhi_collected works vol 44

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Published by: Nrusimha ( नृसिंह ) on Jan 23, 2009
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VOL.44 :16 JANUARY, 1929 -3 FEBRUARY, 1929
1
1. TELEGRAM TO MIRABEHN 
 January 16, 1929
M
IRABEHN
C
ARE
K
HADI
B
HANDAR
M
UZAFFARPURWROTE FULLY YESTERDAY
1
. NOT LEAVING TILLTHIRTYFIRST. LOVE.
B
APU
From the original: C.W. 5331. Courtesy: Mirabehn; also G.N. 9386
2. LETTER TO NARANDAS GANDHI 
S
ATYAGRAHA
A
SHRAM
, S
ABARMATI
,
Wednesday
[On or before
 January 16, 1929
]
2
CHI. NARANDAS,
You seem to have been hurt. I would have been happy to respectyour wishes in regard to Chi. Santok 
3
, but I did not approve of yourplan. For the manner of living of the mother and the daughters is soexpensive that they would always have been a cause of discontent inthe Ashram. Santok never liked the common kitchen, nor the inmatesof the Ashram.About the khadi training section, I have already stated my viewthat neither suggestions can be supported. I see nothing wrong in theview that the Ashram and not an individual should have the agency. Ishall decide finally on the 18th at the latest. I want you to take interestin all activities and participate in them. Trust Chhaganlal. He is asincere and hard-working man. Do not mind his errors, but considerhis motive.About Sannabhai, I have simply said that Chhaganlal Joshi’sdecision should be final. For no one of whom the secretary does notapprove should remain.
1
 Presumably a slip for “day before yesterday”;
vide
“Letter to Mirabehn”,January 1
4
, 1929
.
2
 Year inferred from the allusion to the problem of Santok;
vide
“Letter toNarandas Gandhi”, December 19, 1928. As Gandhiji asked Narandas to see him on the18th, the date of this letter could be fixed on the preceding Wednesday which was16th January.
3
 Widow of Maganlal Gandhi.
 
2
THE COLLECTED WORKS OF MAHATMA GANDHI
You may write to me anything you wish to. If you can comeover for the 18th, do so. If you think that both of you should come,do that. If you do not, I shall reach the decision which seems best tome.
 Blessings from
B
APU
[From Gujarati]
 Bapuna Patro–9: Shri Narandas Gandhine— 
Part I, p.
4
7
3. AMERICAN PATRIOTISM 
Sjt. C. V. Rangam Chetty writes:
Rev. . . . is the head of the American Mission Schools at . . . Hedeputed Mr. . . . , who was an Indian teacher in the Mission School at . . . andwho knows mechanism, to go to . . . and bring materials for his motor-car.Mr. . . . purchased German material which is cheaper and better than theAmerican. Rev. . . . refused to touch it and said that he would not like to payhis money so far as possible to any nation except America. Mr. . . then soldthe material to a Brahmin gentleman at . . . and purchased American material.Mr. . . . who was indifferent to my repeated requests to wear khaddar has nowcome forward to confess his folly and has resolved to wear khaddar in futureafter this incident. I hope our educated and rich countrymen will take a lessonfrom the American and set an example to others.
I have purposely omitted names and places as they are notgermane to my theme. The point is quite clear. Whether the Reverendgentleman referred to did not overstep the limit of patriotism is notthe point to be examined. The lesson Sjt. Rangam Chetty wishes todraw from the incident is quite legitimate. We, in our country, are inhonour bound to prefer handspun khaddar to foreign cloth, no matterhow inconvenient it may be to us. It is flimsy philosophy that teachesus to go to the cheapest market irrespective of what happenstherethrough to our next-door neighbours. Free donations of finewheat from Australia or America will be poison to us, if that meant aworkless India with her soil growing weeds instead of golden grain.Similarly a free gift of cloth from Manchester would be too costly abargain for India to accept. I repeat, therefore, that khaddar is cheapat any price so long as it serves to utilize the idle hours of the nationand there is nothing else immediately in view to occupy them asusefully.
Young India
, 17-1-1929
 
VOL.44 :16 JANUARY, 1929 -3 FEBRUARY, 1929
3
4. THEN AND NOW 
Some critics of the constructive resolution
1
 passed by theCongress think that it is something new sprung by me upon a Cong-ress that was eager for a vigorous, forward policy. In the first place Iclaim no originality for my resolution, for, it closely follows the pres-idential address. In the second, it is identical with the now muchlauded programme of 1920-21,
2
 with certain desirable addi-tions. In1921, as now, we had prohibition with picketing, we had kha-ddar andboycott of foreign cloth with the burning demonstrati-ons and we haduntouchability campaign and Hindu-Muslim unity. The present pro-gramme adds the amelioration of the status ofwomen and removal of kindred social abuses. It also adds village reconstru-ction andorganization of city labour—surely, items that must find place in anyconstructive programme for the attainment of swaraj.Is there not excitement enough in the programme, if Congres-smen are serious about it? Picketing of liquor shops, foreign clothshops and collection and burning of foreign cloth are excitingenough for any worker and are enough to evoke all the resource fuln-ess that the best workers may be capable of.What, indeed, we have not in my resolution of the programme of 1920-21 is the boycott of legislatures, law-courts and educationalinstitutions and titles. Nothing would please me better than to findthese institutions that sustain the Government abandoned by thenation or at least Congressmen. I know that then we should haveswaraj and, what is perhaps more, we should have less corruption inthe Congress than we now have. But that time is not yet. Congressmenassist legislatures, law-courts and schools as much as any other, andperhaps during this year when the Congress works for the attainmentof a constitution in accordance with the Nehru Report it must functionthrough the legislatures. In any event one year is not too much evenfor the most impatient independencewallah to organize for thequadruple boycott assuming, of course, that the Nehru Report status isnot attained during the twelve months. And if we are serious about
1
 V
ide
”Speech on Constructive Programme, Calcutta Congress”, January 1,1929.
2
 V
ide
Appendix “Congress Resolution on Non-Cooperation”, December 30,1920.

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