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The Express-Times for October 30, 2012

The Express-Times for October 30, 2012

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Published by lehighvalleylive
The Express-Times home delivery was suspended for Oct. 30, 2012 due to weather conditions from Hurricane Sandy. This is the paper that was produced.
The Express-Times home delivery was suspended for Oct. 30, 2012 due to weather conditions from Hurricane Sandy. This is the paper that was produced.

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Published by: lehighvalleylive on Oct 29, 2012
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12/04/2012

 
BY NICK FALSONE
The Express-Times
The threat of HurricaneSandy paralyzed the Lehigh Valley and northwest New Jer-sey on Monday as residentsand officials braced for pulver-izing conditions that were on-ly expected to intensifyovernight into today.Power outages and the po-tential for flooding plaguedthe entire region. In Bethle- hem, officials ordered apart-ments evacuated near theMonocacy Creek.In Easton, fears of a city- wide power loss prompted themayor to set a 9 p.m. Mondaycurfew. Emergency sheltersopened in Belvidere, Phillips- burg and elsewhere.The greater threat to the re-gion appeared to be windrather than rain, forecasterssaid Monday afternoon.The National Weather Ser- vice issued a high wind warn-ing for all of Lehigh andNorthampton counties. Advi-sories for windy conditions al-so were issued for Hunterdonand Warren counties.“This is an extremely dan-gerous situation,” the weather service said in a statement.Gusts were predicted toreach up to 75 mph overnight,the statement said.Electric utilities anticipat-ed that power outages wouldaffect hundreds of thousandsof customers and could last up
^
In the interest ofsafety for our employeesand contractors, TheExpress-Times is deliv-ering Tuesday’s news-paper with Wednesday’seditions. Home deliveryTuesday was suspendedbecause of HurricaneSandy, although thenewspaper was availableat select single-copylocations.
^
Check for any schoolclosings, storm cancella-tions, etc., at lehighval-leylive.com. The weatheralso has forced post-ponement ofWednesday’s scheduledBreakfast Showdownvisit to Stemie’s Place onRoute 611 in WilliamsTownship.
INDEX
Abby |
A5
Almanac |
A5
Classified |
B6
Comics |
B5
Legals |
B8
Lotteries |
A2
Obituaries
|
B4
Opinion |
A6
Puzzles |
B5,7
Scoreboard
|
B3
Sports |
B1
Sudoku |
B7
TV |
A5
WEATHER
TO OUR READERS
LEHIGH’S McCOLLUM NAMED PRESEASON ALL-AMERICAN
| PAGE B1
For convenient, reliable home delivery, A2 |
Tuesday, October 30, 2012
| 75 cents
REGIONAL EDITION
LEHIGH VALLEY’S
BEST LOCAL NEWSPAPER
BY ERIN MCCLAMAND KATIE ZEZIMA
Associated Press
ATLANTIC CITY |
 A furi-ous Hurricane Sandy be-gan the westward lurchthat forecasters feared andtook dead aim at New Jer-sey and Delaware on Mon-day, washing away part of the Atlantic City board- walk, putting the presiden-tial campaign on hold andthreatening to cripple WallStreet and the New Yorksubway system with an epicsurge of seawater.Gaining speed and pow-er through the day, thestorm knocked out electric-ity to more than 1 million people and figured to up-end life for tens of millionsmore. It clobbered theghost-town cities of theNortheast corridor, from Washington, D.C., toBoston, with stinging rainand gusts of more than 60mph. As it drew near, Sandymoved closer to converging with two cold-weather sys-tems to form a hellish su- perstorm of snow, rain and wind. Forecasters warnedof 20-foot waves bashinginto the Chicago lakefrontand up to 3 feet of snow in
AP PHOTO
Madison Maher, left, runs into the rain Monday while her mother, Susan Sorenson, takes a picture of the rough surf at Sea Bright, N.J.
EXPRESS-TIMES PHOTO |M
 
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Northampton County Emergency Management Coordinator Bob Mateff explainsthe role of the county’s emergency operations center.
BY JEFF SISTRUNKAND KATHRYN BRENZEL
The Express-Times
 With emergency declara-tions in place, and HurricaneSandy continuing to bear down on the region,Northampton, Warren andHunterdon county authoritiesMonday staffed emergencyoperations centers as calls be-gan to come in for downedtrees and power lines.To speed local disaster re-sponse, Northampton Countyset up a “one-stop shop” at thecounty 911 center in Upper Nazareth Township, said BobMateff, the county emergencymanagement coordinator.Representatives of thePennsylvania Department of Transportation and PPL
BY PAMELA SROKA-HOLZMANN,TOMMY ROWANAND SARA K. SATULLO
The Express-Times
Pennsylvania and New Jer-sey authorities warned resi-dents to stay off the roads, but with school and work closuresMonday, crowds flocked toLehigh Valley and northwestNew Jersey stores and shop- ping centers for last-minutestorm-preparation purchases. At Home Depot locations,shoppers were seeking what was left of power generators, batteries and flashlights. Atthe Greenwich Township loca-tion, shoppers could be seencarrying sand and wooden
Sandy’s surge
$10 BILLION TO $20 BILLION IN DAMAGE
expected when all is said and done.
ONE-STOP SYSTEMS UP AND RUNNING,
officialsin Northampton, Warren and Hunterdon say.
| PLEASE SEE IMPACT, A2| PLEASE SEE HURRICANE, A2
Emergency operations infull swing across region
| PLEASE SEE CENTERS, A2
Hurricane doesn’thold back shoppers
 
Will you stay home forthe duration of thestorm? Vote in our pollat lehighvalleylive.com.
ONLINE POLL
| PLEASE SEE READINESS, A2
‘IT WAS LIKE JULYFOURTH WEEKEND,’
one manager says.
Find live updates andfresh forecasts inaddition to our coverage,including photos,around the clock atlehighvalleylive.com/hurricane-sandy.
^
Get updates on yourphone by downloading ourmobile app for iPhones,Androids and iPads fromthe app store.
GET IT ALL LIVE
Rain and wind, 51°/42°
More weather,lehighvalleylive.com
EXPRESS-TIMES PHOTO |J
 
IM MI
 
D
 
D
 
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F
Shoppers at the Giant supermarket in ForksTownship endure heavy rain Monday afternoon.
‘This is an extremely dangerous situation’
AP PHOTO
Workers haul sandbags Monday to shore up valuable spots in Washington, D.C., atThe Pavilion and the Old Post Office. The Justice Department lies in the background.
Hellish superstormforms to rake coast
 
Electric Utilities and FirstEn-ergy’s Metropolitan Edison were expected to arrive at thecenter by Monday afternoon, he said. Warren County opened itsemergency operations center Monday morning at the 911center on Route 57, as author-ities anticipated a high volumeof storm-related calls, saidFrank Wheatley, the county’sdirector of public safety andemergency management coor-dinator. The center will beopen for the duration of thestorm, he said.Hunterdon County’s Emer-gency Operations Center alsoopened Monday and will re-main operational as the stormcontinues to affect the area.Northampton County’scenter will be staffed aroundthe clock until further noticeand has a bank of generatorsthat can be activated in theevent of a power outage, said Angel Gillette, spokeswomanfor the county division of emergency management.“We’ll have people here24/7 from now until the situa-tion is resolved,” Mateff said,noting that post-storm effortssuch as damage assessmentsare a large part of an emer-gency response and canstretch on for days after a storm passes.Emergency officials will bein constant contact with thePennsylvania Emergency Man-agement Agency and officials inall 38 municipalities to assessthe need for aid, Mateff said.Personnel will also keep intouch with organizers of the American Red Cross of theGreater Lehigh Valley’s emer-gency shelter at 2121 City LineRoad in Bethlehem, he said. Warren County also had a  backup in place to keep com-munications flowing.In case the communica-tions center loses power, a team of about 15 ham-radiooperators — part of the Radio Amateur Civil EmergencyServices — will be deployedthroughout the county to coor-dinate with authorities.The amateur operators work in coordination with thecommunications center and will be stationed at WarrenHaven and St. Luke’s Hospi-tal, Phillipsburg, with battery- powered radios, Wheatleysaid.“I always say they couldtake two sticks and a rubber  band and talk to China,” Wheatley said. “They are veryastute at what they do.” A group of licensed volun-teers, the Amateur RadioEmergency Services Team isalso available to work withmunicipal emergency coordi-nators in Warren County.to a week in some parts be-cause of winds knocking downlines.Tens of thousands in New  Jersey and Pennsylvania hadalready lost power as of Mon-day afternoon. Locally, thenumber of power outages wasin the thousands as of Mondayevening.
Rivers should not flood
Heavy rainfall was still a major concern for emergencycoordinators. Creeks that have historically flooded duringmajor storms were expectedto swell beyond their banks.The Lehigh and Delawarerivers, however, were not ex- pected to flood. Forecasters predicted the Lehigh River inBethlehem would crest early Wednesday morning at 7.7 feet, well below the 16 feetthat’s considered flood stage.Projections call for theDelaware River in Eastoncresting at 16.4 feet on Wednesday afternoon.Flood stage is 22 feet.These predictions were allsubject to change based on the path of the storm. Although the floodingthreat to the Delaware River  basin appears to be lessened,meteorologist Patrick O’Hara cautioned that could be de- pendent on the reservoirs atthe river’s head waters in New  York.“It maybe won’t do so bad-ly as some other areas,”O’Hara, who works with the weather service in MountHolly, N.J., said of theDelaware’s upper basin. “It’sstill a significant stormthroughout the state.”
Eye toward Jersey Shore
Outside the region, the sit-uation was gloomier. Hurri-cane Sandy strengthened lateMonday morning and made a turn toward the East Coast.Storm surges flooded largeswaths of the Jersey Shore andthreatened to do the same inNew York City. Virtually all commercecame to a halt in Manhattan asofficials shut down the New  York Stock Exchange, publictransit and the two major tun-nels that connect New Jerseyand the island.Local residents who own property on the Jersey Shoresaid they were imploring ten-ants to leave the properties if they hadn’t already.Rachel Haddad, of Easton,owns several properties in At-lantic City and Brigantine, N.J.She said some of the tenantsare trying to ride out the stormdespite her pleas that theyleave.Back in this region, emer-gency officials were hopefulmost residents would heed warnings. NorthamptonCounty sent home allnonessential employees at 2 p.m. Monday.Most schools were closedMonday and planned to stayshuttered today. Lehigh ValleyInternational Airport was vir-tually empty; all flights werecanceled. LANTA shut downalmost all of its transit servic-es.Emergency crews put up barricades to stop traffic fromtraveling on roads that wereexpected to flood. Pennsylva-nia lowered speed limits onInterstate 78 and other major  highways. A stretch of Seventh Streetin Allentown, and portions of College View Drive in Hack-ettstown were among thoseclosed to traffic.
Contingency plans
County officials on bothsides of the Delaware River spent much of Monday firm-ing up contingency plans in theevent the power outages affecttheir essential operations.In case the Warren Countycommunication center loses power, a team of about 15 hand-radio operators — Ra-dio Amateur Civil EmergencyServices — will be deployedthroughout the county to coor-dinate with authorities. Theamateur operators work in co-ordination with the communi-cations center and will be sta-tioned at Warren Haven andSt. Luke’s Hospital inPhillipsburg with battery- powered radios, said Frank Wheatley, Warren County’s public safety/emergency man-agement coordinator.“I always say they couldtake two sticks and a rubber  band and talk to China,” Wheatley said. “They are veryastute at what they do.” Angel Gillette, a spokes- woman for NorthamptonCounty’s office of emergencymanagement, said the coun-ty’s 911 center in Upper Nazareth Township isequipped with a bank of gen-erators that will power opera-tions in the event of an outage.Despite the anxiety aboutthe storm, some residents were taking the storm instride. Ed Supon, of East AllenTownship, said he’d alreadystocked up on the necessities,including gallons and gallonsof water, a small generator andfirewood.On Monday afternoon, he was among a steady stream of customers who stopped atTanczos Beverage in Hanover Township, NorthamptonCounty.“Now I’m getting beer tolast me seven days,” Suponsaid with a laugh Monday af-ternoon.
Reporters Andrew George, Sara K.Satullo, Kathryn Brenzel, PamelaSroka-Holzmann, Jeff Sistrunk,Regional Editor Kurt Bresswein,Assistant Managing Editor/Opera-tions Tony Rhodin and The Associ-ated Press contributed to thisreport.
 boards into their cars.Sergio Moreira, owner of Express Employment Profes-sionals in Palmer Township, visited the Palmer Home De- pot to buy 20 sandbags for his business and needed more todeflect water from the door- way.“I’m trying to get more to-day,” he said. A Williams Township mansearched for charcoal so hecould grill once the power  went, and Bill Verbics, of Palmer Township, was buyingsupplies to cover his basement window wells to keep out wa-ter.Fast-food eateries along25th Street saw a steady earlyafternoon stream of vehiclesmoving through the Burger King, McDonald’s andDunkin’ Donuts drive-throughs. The parking lot wasfull by noon at the Giant super-market in Palmer, with resi-dents stocking up on the usualmilk, eggs, bread and cannedgoods.Milton Fedd, of Easton,filled his cart with a 12-pack of  water bottles, peanut butter,chips and what he describedas his “favorite comfort food”:a bag of pistachios.“The shelves are basically bare,” he reported after check-ing out. “I was finding stuff that’s not going to go bad,things you don’t need to heatto cook with.” A line formed at the Red- box kiosk outside the super-market with people interestedin renting DVDs before the power went out.“We’re looking for anythingnew that’s out right now,” saidMiller Horan, of Wilson Bor-ough, who grabbed a movie with her daughter, Brianna Horan, a senior at Wilson Area High School.Patrick Sessions, of BucksCounty, who works for Poly-tek Development Corp. in Williams Township, was recy-cling water jugs outside theGiant, noting he already had10 gallons and was stocking upanother five gallons. He alsofilled up the gas tank in his car and got gasoline for his power generator, he said. At Frank & Dot’s Beer De- pot in Easton, a clerk by 1 p.m.said he sold the last three 20- pound bags of ice. Sales of beer and cigarettes were steady.Easton resident Angelo Ortizstopped in for two packs of cig-arettes and a candy bar — thelast purchases before thestorm, he said.“I hope we just get the rain hard but no flooding,” he said.
Ready for Sandy
Ed Supon on Monday after-noon declared himself readyfor Sandy.The East Allen Townshipresident had gallons and gal-lons of water in his home, a small generator set up in thegarage — he keeps the door open to keep carbon monoxidefrom accumulating — andenough firewood to keep warm for five days.“Now I’m getting beer tolast me seven days,” Suponsaid with a laugh Monday af-ternoon at Tanczos Beveragein Hanover Township,Northampton County.Supon was just one of a steady stream of customersstopping at Tanczos to stockup. Customers said that de-spite warnings to stay home,they weren’t concerned to bedriving and running errands because rain was light and winds had not yet picked up.Manager Chris Matla saidthe store sold out of ice and water over the weekend butshelves were restocked for Monday.“It was like July Fourth weekend here,” Matla said. “It was crazy.”Tanczos planned to stayopen until it didn’t make senseanymore, he said. The storetypically closes at 9 p.m. Mon-days. As soon as the doorsopened Monday morning, cus-tomers were hauling cases of  beer up to registers.“This Monday morning was like a typical Friday atrush hour,” Matla said.Sam Kalic, of Bethlehem, has a house full of guests fromEurope for her daughter’s wedding this weekend in New  York City.Kalic said she was trying tostock up on food and drink andthen planned to head homeuntil Wednesday morninglikely.“I’m certainly not going to be on the road tonight or to-morrow,” Kalic said.
Closed stores
Plenty of businesses closedMonday. The Lehigh ValleyMall made the call Sundaynight. Sears and Bon-Ton re-mained open for a brief periodat the Phillipsburg Mall, which otherwise was closed.The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board closed all itsliquor stores statewide in an-ticipation of Hurricane Sandy.The board planned to contin-ue to monitor weather condi-tions to determine whether the stores will remain closedor reopen as scheduled today.The Shoprite in GreenwichTownship was closed, but theRedbox kiosks outside thefront door still drew a crowd. Victor Narra, clerk of Park- way Liquors & Deli, at Memo-rial Parkway (Route 22) andSouth Fourth Street in Lopat-cong Township, was openeven though he said business was slow.He didn’t want to open, buta contractor was scheduled toswing by and finish recon-struction of the store’s outside wall after a truck crashedthough it Oct. 10.Narra said people are pan-icking because of the proximi-ty to the Delaware River, evenas forecasts indicated it wouldcrest well short of flood stage.“It’s scary,” he said. “Theydon’t want to lose anything.”
Continued from A1
READINESS:
Hurricane doesn’thold back shoppers
A2
Tuesday, October 30, 2012
BREAKING NEWS:
lehighvalleylive.com
HURRICANE SANDY
Monday, Oct. 29, 2012PENNSYLVANIAMIDDAY:Daily Number:
554
Big 4:
7133
Quinto:
3, 2, 2, 8, 3
Treasure Hunt:
2, 5, 15, 21, 30
NEW JERSEYMIDDAY:Pick 3:
018
Payoffs:
Straight, $301.50; Box, $50; Pairs,$30
Pick 4:
5867
Payoffs:
Straight, $2,640; Box, $110Due to weather conditions, the eveninglotteries for Monday were not available atpress time. They will appear inWednesday’s paper.Readers should check with their point ofpurchase to confirm winning numbers.
LOTTERIES
Member of The Associated PressPublished seven days a week by
The Express-Times, 30 N. 4th St.,Easton, PA 18042
PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAIDAT EASTON, PENNSYLVANIA.
POSTMASTER:
SEND ADDRESSCHANGESTOTHE EXPRESS-TIMES, P.O.BOX 391 EASTON, PA, 18044-0391
USPS 166-300
Mail Subscription Rates:
52 weeks: $354,26 weeks: $177, 13 weeks: $90, 4 weeks:$28
Outside PA and NJ:
52 weeks: $423,26 weeks: $212, 13 weeks: $106, 4weeks: $32
For circulation:
Call 610-252-6500 or800-360-3602
EXPRESS-TIMES PHOTO | M
 
ATT S
 
MITH
Robert Robeski, chief Radio Amateur Civil EmergencyService officer, adjusts the volume level on a radioMonday afternoon in the Warren County 911command center in Franklin Township. The amateurradio operators staged at area hospitals and sheltersto augment the county’s communications.
 
During the storm, New Jersey’s largest daily newspaper, TheStar-Ledger, is offering free access to its digital replicaedition, which allows you to view the newspaper’s pages online.To do so, go to ed.starledger.com/daypass. Use the passwordFREE, in all capitals. It will prompt you for the password aswell as your email and telephone number. Be sure to usenumerals only on the phone number
no hyphens. Eachday’s edition will be available by 5:30 a.m.
FREE OFFER
As of Monday evening, thousands of people were without electricity in the Lehigh Valley andnorthwest New Jersey. Utilities were reporting the following numbers.PPL:
Lehigh County
495 outages, the majority of which were in the Slatington, Lower Milfordand Upper Saucon townships. Northampton County
162 outages, the majority of which were inPlainfield Township and Lower Saucon Township.
JCP&L:
Warren County
2,826 apparent outages, the majority of which were in Knowlton,Blairstown, Liberty and Washington townships. Hunterdon County
10,187 apparent outages, themajority of which were in Frenchtown and the townships of Clinton, Tewksbury, Delaware and Raritan.
Met-Ed:
Northampton County
1,832 apparent outages, most of which were in Moore andBushkill townships, and Nazareth.
Natural gas companies:UGI Gas
says flooding caused by heavy rain could result in an interruptionof service. Anyone affected should call 800-276-2722. UGI customers who smell the rotten-egg odorantadded to gas should leave the building immediately and call 800-276-2722.
Elizabethtown Gas
customers should call 800-492-4009. Both utilities say gas appliances underwater need to be inspected before they are restarted.
UTILITY OUTAGESWHO TO CALL
^
PPL Electric: 800-DIAL-PPL (800-342-5775).
^
Metropolitan Edison andJersey Central Power &Light: 888-LIGHTSS(888-544-4877).
^
Northampton Countyresidents seeking informa-tion about emergency shel-ters may call 610-759-2600.
^
Aqua New JerseyPhillipsburg call center:908-859-4800.
^
Easton Suburban WaterAuthority: 610-258-7181.
^
The Hunterdon CountyOffice of EmergencyManagement asks that resi-dents contact their localmunicipal emergencymanagers. A list ofHunterdon County contactsis available on the county’sFacebook pagefacebook.com/HunterdonCountyDOP.
^
The Warren CountyOffice of EmergencyManagement asks that resi-dents contact their localmunicipal emergencymanagers. A list of WarrenCounty contacts is availableon the county’s websiteco.warren.nj.us/municipal.html.If a municipal building isnot open, contact theWarren County EmergencyOperations Center at 908-835-2080 or the countyEmergency Managementoffice at 908-835-2051 or908-835-2047.
^
The American Red Crossof the Greater LehighValley opened an emer-gency shelter at 2121 CityLine Road, Bethlehem. TheLehigh Valley CountyAnimal Response Team isopening a shelter at thesame location and can bereached at 610-390-0088.
Continued from A1
HURRICANE:
Sandy’s surge
 West Virginia. Airlines canceled 10,000flights, disrupting the plans of travelers all over the world,and storm damage was pro- jected at $10 billion to $20 bil-lion, meaning it could prove to be one of the costliest naturaldisasters in U.S. history.President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney canceled their campaign appearances at the very height of the race, with just over a week to go beforeElection Day. The president pledged the government’s helpand made a direct plea fromthe White House to those inthe storm’s path.“When they tell you to evac-uate, you need to evacuate,” hesaid. “Don’t delay, don’t pause,don’t question the instructionsthat are being given becausethis is a powerful storm.”Sandy, which killed 69 peo- ple in the Caribbean beforemaking its way up the Atlantic, began to hook left at midday,moving at almost 30 mph —faster than forecasters had ex- pected. While the hurricane’s 90mph winds registered as onlya Category 1 on a scale of 5, it packed “astoundingly low” barometric pressure, giving itterrific energy to push water inland, said Kerry Emanuel, a  professor of meteorology atMIT.“We are looking at the high-est storm surges ever record-ed” in the Northeast, said Jeff Masters, meteorology director for Weather Underground, a  private forecasting service.“The energy of the storm surgeis off the charts, basically.”
Continued from A1
IMPACT:
Hellish superstormforms to rake coast
Continued from A1
CENTERS:
Emergency operationsin full swing acrossregion
 
A3
Tuesday, October 30, 2012

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