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10.30.12

10.30.12

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Tuesday, October 30, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 47 
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................6
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .....................12Puzzles .................... 11Classifieds ...............11
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63º/39º
 Wednesday 68º/41º
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SPORTS
PAGE 12 Alabama prepares for ahostile environment 
WELCOME TO DEATH VALLEY
NEWS
| COPPER TOP SHOOTING
CULTURE
| TICKET PRICES
NEWS
| IMMIGRATION
By Becky Robinson
Staff Reporter
Students who have been to their fair share of concerts know the actual price of a cheap $20ticket can rise quickly because of charges andfees.Ticket companies and venues often add anynumber of fees to the ticket’s original price.While these fees may be annoying and often con-fusing to ticket buyers, each serves a purpose.Wendy Riggs, the director of arts and enter-tainment for the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater, saidthe original price of a ticket depends on a vari-ety of factors.“[Price] depends on the artist guarantee, thenumber of tickets available and the agreementbetween the artist management and the pro-moter,” Riggs said. “It’s math – how much anartist contracts for divided by number of seatsin a venue.”After a ticket is bought either online or in per-son, companies add fees to cover its cost. Riggssaid fee types differ between companies.TicketMaster, an online and mobile ticket ser-vice, charges a convenience fee. Even thoughevent-goers can now print tickets online or storethem on smart phones, a company uses that feeto keep its website running.“The infrastructure of a ticketing companyand the convenience charge of this service iswhat they are paying for,” Riggs said of at-homeprinting.Additionally, credit card companies receivea portion of ticket sales when a customer usestheir credit card to purchase a ticket online.When ticket companies such as Ticketmasteror Stubhub charge high fees, they often includeperks for the customer such as guaranteeing theticket’s authenticity or fast shipment.Charlotte Lawson, a senior majoring in politi-cal science and criminal justice, said she oftengoes to sporting events and concerts and has topay a variety of fees.“Ticketmaster usually charges their con-venience fees for buying the tickets early, butthose aren’t usually horrendously expensive,”Lawson said. “Stubhub, on the other hand, ispretty pricey when buying expensive tickets,but all of their guarantees make the cost worthit.”Patricia Pratt, box office manager of theTuscaloosa Amphitheater, said despite themany fees associated with tickets, the venuerarely sees much profit.“Most venues make their money on conces-sions,” Pratt said. “Venue fees are necessary fora company such as the Tuscaloosa Amphitheaterto continue providing services.”Similarly, Riggs said most of the money madefrom ticket sales and fees goes to the artist orthe ticket company.
Fees pay 3rdparty costs,raise prices
Buying online, with credit cardoften cause of higher ticket costs
By Judah Martin
Contributing Writer
“Forrest Gump” AuthorWinston Groom’s life of writ-ing has proven to be very muchlike a box of chocolates, thoughhe pointed out that phrase isactually only from the movieadaptation of the book.“I got so many boxes of choc-olate after the movie cameout,” Groom said. “It’s a goodthing I like chocolates.”After working as a reporterfor the Washington Star andpublishing 17 books of variousgenres, Groom returned to hisUniversity of Alabama almamater on Monday to speakto students in the FergusonCenter.“The first thing I learned atUA was winning,” Groom said.“It is a tradition here.”Groom said the idea for“Forrest Gump” began with astory his father told him.“In the neighborhood, therewas a young man who, by thevernacular of the day, wasretarded,” Groom said. “Thekids teased him, and theythrew rocks and sticks athim. Then one day his motherbought him a piano and peoplestarted to hear this beautifulmusic coming from the home.The kid had learned to play thepiano.”It is a phenomenon calledidiot savant syndrome, inwhich a mentally disabled per-son displays pockets of bril-liance.Groom said he returnedhome after hearing the storyand began writing notes. Bymidnight he’d written the firstchapter of what would become“Forrest Gump.’“It was almost miraculousfor a writer,” Groom said.“That sort of thing just neverhappens. As I started writing,I was feeling less and less incharge of this book.”Groom said there are atleast eight qualities that writ-ing and UA football have incommon. The first quality isleadership.“As a writer, you are thecommanding general,” Groomsaid. “It is your job to makesure that everything you dois as perfect as you can get it.You own it.”The remaining qualities areadaptability, dedication, risk,humility, persistence, failureand redemption.“These old reporters, if youlook in their desks, you’ll findtwo things,” Groom said. “Apack of either Lucky Strikes orMarlboros and an unfinishedmanuscript for a novel. I didn’twant that to be me. That’s therisk.”English instructor CarlMiller incorporated ForrestGump into a class he taughtcalled “The history of litera-ture in college football,” in thesummer of 2011. He later dis-covered that Groom had plansto attend the 2012 HomecomingParade and contacted him tospeak at the University.
‘Forrest Gump’ author returns to UA, compares writing to football
NEWS
| GUEST LECTURER
CW | Shannon Auvi
 Winston Groom
University of Alabama alumni, WinstonGroom speaks on writing his famous book
SEE
AUTHOR
PAGE 2SEE
 TICKETS
PAGE 2
Immigrant asks, ‘Is this Alabama?’
By Melissa Brown
News Editor
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist-activist andundocumented immi-grant Jose AntonioVargas asked Universityof Alabama students howthey plan to respond toincreasing diversity inAmerica in a talk centeredaround undocumentedimmigrants Monday night.Vargas, a current colum-nist for TIME.com, sharedhis background story anddiscussed his documen-tary work in the state, anonline venture titled “IsThis Alabama?”The website featuresfour videos of differentAlabamian perspectivesof HB-56, the immigrationbill that Vargas called the“strictest in the country.”Jennifer Greer, the chairof the University’s journal-ism department, said bring-ing Vargas to speak to stu-dents was a way to showstudents what roles jour-nalists can fill beyond justinforming the public.“One of the roles of jour-nalism is to make sure webring people from a varietyof perspectives into to talkabout issues like this [immi-gration,]” Greer said.Vargas was born andraised in the Philippinesuntil he moved to live withhis maternal grandparentsin California at age 12. Hewas unaware of his undocu-mented status until he was15, when he went to theDMV to apply for a drivingpermit and learned that hisgreen card was fake.“I didn’t understand whymy grandparents and mymother didn’t tell me whatthe situation was,” Vargassaid. “If I hadn’t discovered journalism a year after,I’m frankly not sure what Iwould have done.”
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist speakson mindsets of average Alabamaians
SEE
VARGAS
PAGE 2
A
high-profile local casecould soon put a spot-light on the strains onAlabama’s mental health facil-ities due to state budget cuts.Nathan Van Wilkins, the manarrested for injuring 18 peoplewhen he allegedly opened fireinto The Copper Top bar onJuly 17, pleaded not guilty onAug. 17 to 68 counts in connec-tion to the shooting, accordingto a report from al.com.Wilkins has pleadednot guilty by reason of insanity, according to al.com.If he were to win his case withthis defense, though, statecuts could affect or even delaythe treatment the court wouldorder him to receive.Although a well-knowndefense in criminal law, theinsanity plea is rare, accord-ing to Joseph Colquitt, theBeasley Professor of Law atThe University of AlabamaSchool of Law. Beasley citedan eight-state study that foundthe plea is used less than onepercent of the time in thecases reviewed.“At that rate, only two orthree cases in a thousandwould be expected to result inan insanity verdict,” Colquittsaid. “Moreover, a substantialmajority, 75 percent or more,of insanity acquittals resultfrom an agreement by theprosecution and the defenseon the validity of the defenserather than as a result of a jury verdict from contestedevidence.”Despite the low rate of cases, John Toppins, directorof psychology services at theTaylor Hardin Secure MedicalFacility in Tuscaloosa, saidpatients often experiencedelays getting admitted evenafter a court order, becauseof the limited number of bedsavailable. The Taylor HardinFacility treats patients afterthey receive a not guilty ver-dict for reason of insanity.
CW | Shannon Auvil
The Taylor Hardin Secure Medical Facility in Tuscaloosa treats patients after they receive a not guilty verdict for reason of insanity.
High-profile case,low-profile problem
By Chandler Wright |
Staff Reporter
CW File
Nathan Van Wilkins
Nathan Van Wilkins,who was arrested forallegedly opening fireinto Copper Top on July 17, has pleadednot guilty by reason of insanity. His case couldspotlight the strainon Alabama’s mentalhealth system.
SEE
MENTAL HEALTH
PAGE 2
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
LUNCH
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LAKESIDE WEDNESDA
 What:
Can-or-Treat LocalFood Drive
 Where:
Ferguson CenterPlaza
 When:
5:45 p.m.
 What:
CLC Movie Night:‘Old Boy’
 Where:
241 B.B. Comer Hall
 When:
6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
 What:
Last Day to Withdrawfrom Courses
 When:
All Day
TODAY 
What:
Cynthia MacCrae &Roderick George
Where:
Moody MusicBuilding
When:
5:30 p.m.
What:
XPress Night
Where:
Ferguson CenterStarbucks
When:
6 - 9 p.m.
What:
Bollywood FilmFestival: ‘Ishqiya’
Where:
Riverside Commu-nity Center Media Room
When:
7 - 10 p.m.
THURSDAY 
What:
Art Night in Down-town Northport
Where:
Kenctuck Art Center
When:
5 - 9 p.m.
What:
Cavell Trio
Where:
Moody Music Build-ing
When:
7:30 p.m.
What:
‘A New Brain’
Where:
Allen Bales Theatre
When:
7:30 p.m.
GO
GO
Page 2• Tuesday,October 30, 2012
 
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BURKE
“It really shows his com-mitment to the University,”Miller said. “Some of thepeople in the audience aregoing to make names forthemselves as writers, andI hope having [Groom] hereis inspiring for them.”Sigma Tau Delta, theUniversity’s EnglishHonors Society, sponsoredthe event.“The Phi Xi Chapter oSigma Delta Tau is reallyexcited to be able to hosthis kind of talk,” said NadiBarksdale, a senior major-ing in English. “We hopeto bring in other Alabamwriters to speak at UA.”
AUTHOR
FROM PAGE 1
Miller hopes Groominspired UA’s writers
Lindsay Smith, a juniormajoring in marketing, saidshe attends many concertsand admitted the fees asso-ciated with tickets can befrustrating.“I attend some eventshere in Tuscaloosa,mostly at the TuscaloosaAmphitheater,” Smithsaid. “[I pay] anywherefrom $10 to about $60. TheAmphitheater often offersdiscounted ticket prices orstudent tickets through theFerg for about $15, whichis awesome.”Smith said when she buya ticket online she usuallhas to pay a conveniencefee in addition to taxes.“If I buy a ticket at anactual box office, there aretypically less or no conve-nience fees, but it’s oftendifficult to get tickets fromthe venues, especially fome because I go to so manyout-of-town shows,” Smithsaid. “Ultimately though,it’s all worth it becauselove seeing my favorite art-ists perform – there’s noth-ing like it for me.”
“Many times patients will beadmitted for treatment a yearor more after they have beencharged,” Toppins said. “Evenwhen the court has orderedtreatment, sometimes it cantake three months to get intoTaylor Hardin because we can’taccept a new patient without anopen bed.”Toppins said the TaylorHardin Facility also does pre-trial work with patients.“Not guilty for reason of insanity patients are treatedin our facility after receivingthis verdict from the courts.Pre-trial patients have beencharged with a crime and havenot been seen in court, yet,”Toppins said. “In many cases,patients are also evaluatedregarding their competence tostand trial, which is a consti-tutional right. Patients aren’talways assessed for both cases,but it’s pretty common for theseto go hand-in-hand.”Toppins said after obser-vation and analysis, TaylorHardin Secure Medical Facilitypsychologists draft reports andprovide opinions before thecourts regarding a defendant’scurrent mental state and dur-ing the time of the crime.This work, Colquitt said, ispart of the development of aninsanity defense.“Normally, the insan-ity defense is supported byevidence developed throughmental examinations and test-ing by psychiatrists, psycholo-gists and other mental healthtreatment professionals,”Colquitt said. “In many cases,lay testimony concerning thedefendant and any aberrantbehavior observed by a witnessor witnesses is support of theinsanity defense.”According to the AlabamaConstitution, mental diseasecan be a defense for any crimeif the accused proves an inabil-ity to comprehend, at the timeof the crime, the severity of theact because of mental diseaseor defect.
“The main question [regard-ing the criminally insane]is the mental state of thedefendant at the time of theact,” James Tucker, the assis-tant director of the AlabamaDisability Advocacy Programat The University of Alabama,said. “Essentially, mentalhealth staff to try to determinewhether or not the defendanthad the mental capacity, atthe time of the crime, to formcriminal intent.”This staff might soon thinout. Last spring, the AlabamaDepartment of Mental Healthannounced plans to lay off 948employees and close many psy-chiatric hospitals in the state,according to al.com. Tuckersaid Alabama citizens shouldbe concerned about the cuts– over the past four years, theDepartment of Mental Healthhas been cut by $40 million.
“There is definitely a reasonfor citizens of Alabama to beconcerned about the cuts fac-ing mental health and socialservice programs in the state,”Tucker said. “There were prob-ably places that needed to becut back, but I don’t understandwhy we need to cut $40 mil-lion when federal funding canmatch almost 2:1 for communi-ty-based treatment facilities.”Tucker suggested stateinvestment in more commu-nity-based treatment centers,rather than institutional treat-ment centers like Taylor HardinSecure Medical Facility.“Institutional care is nowlargely viewed as a last resort,”Tucker said. “At a place likeTaylor Hardin, the state of Alabama pays 100 percent of the cost for each bed. Theseinstitutions don’t receive anymoney from the federal govern-ment. However, community-based services, like outpatientcenters and group homes, costsare largely matched by federalfunds.”However, Toppins said thebudget cuts haven’t affectedTaylor Hardin Secure MedicalFacility treatment or intakerate, despite being short on psy-c
hiatrists and psychologists.“The budget cuts don’t affectour treatment. If we’re short-staffed, then everyone justworks overtime,” Tobbins said.“The work doesn’t change evenwhen we’re understaffed. If apatient stays longer, it doesn’tnecessarily affect the ability foranother patient to begin treat-ment at Taylor Hardin. We’retalking weeks here, not a hor-ribly long time.”
Tucker said current fundallocation and budgeting maymake Department of Healthprograms impossible to main-tain in coming years.“We are approaching a pointwhen the department of mentalhealth won’t be able to sustainitself,” Tucker said.
Vargas went on to workfor The Washington Post,where he wrote award-winning coverage of theVirginia Techmassacre,and coveredvarious can-didates on the2008 presiden-tial campaignbefore pen-ning an essayfor The NewYork Timesrevealing hisundocumentedstatus.Vargas saidhis role as a journalist haschanged since revealinghimself as anundocumented immigrant.“I knew that instead of relying on news organiza-tions to tell my story, I hadto tell my own,” Vargassaid. “It’s just very uncom-fortable, for a journalist.It’s kind of a separation of church and state – journal-ists are not supposed to talkabout themselves; we’renot supposed to insert our-selves in the middle of it.”George Daniels, anassociate professor inthe journalism depart-ment, said that althoughVargas’ advocacy journal-ism work is not the typicalprint medium, it’s still verymuch journalism.“We’re going to emphasizehow the work of the printedword can be transformedand presented in so manydifferent mediums, one of those beingthe docu-mentarymedium,”Daniels said.Vargas’“Is ThisAlabama?”documen-tary seriesarose whenhe visitedBirminghamlast October,shortly afterthe passage of HB-56. He saidhe was interested in gettingpast the Alabama stereotypeand seeing what the averageAlabamian was like.In two videos, a whitefarmer and a white school-teacher talk about how theydon’t agree with the law andhow it could adversely affecttheir lives. In another, a manverbally harasses the vid-eographer and Vargas, yell-ing obscenities and tellingthem to “get their papers orget out.”“Is that Alabama,” Vargassaid in reference to the vid-eos, “or is this Alabama?”
VARGAS
FROM PAGE 1
Journalist tells hisimmigration story
 TICKETS
FROM PAGE 1
Some students sayextra price worth it
MENTAL HEALTH
FROM PAGE 1
Wilkins case couldshow effect of cuts
It’s just very uncomfortable,for a journalist. It’s kind of aseparation of church and state– journalists are not supposedto talk about themselves; we’re not supposed to insertourselves in the middle of it.
— Jose Antonio Vargas
 
By April Ivey 
Contributing Writer
Frank Jackson, a world-renowned philosopher andexpert in the philosophy of the mind, will be presentinga lecture titled “The Problemof Consciousness Revisited”Tuesday at 7:30 p.m. in room205 of Smith Hall.Jackson, a distinguishedprofessor of philosophyat Australian NationalUniversity and a visit-ing professor at PrincetonUniversity, will focuson whether science canexplain consciousness.In his thought experiment,“The Mary Case,” Jacksonproposed that if a scien-tist who understood all theunderlying scientific con-cepts of the color red wereraised in a world of onlyblack and white, she wouldlearn something when actu-ally exposedto red.“Qualitativeexperiencesassociated withconsciousness,such as ‘Whatit’s like to seered’ cannot beexplained byscientific factsalone,” saidSpencer Carter,a graduate stu-dent studyingapplied sta-tistics. “Butif science canexplain all physical things,then it means consciousnessmust have some non-physi-cal component.”However, Jackson founda flaw in his theory andchanged his mind in 1998. Henow believessciencecan, in fact,explain con-sciousness.The workwas ground-breaking inthe field of philosophy of the mind andcontinues tobe debatedtoday.“Dr.Jacksonframed theissue in a waythat no one else has before,”said Torin Alter, profes-sor of philosophy. “HearingJackson speak would be likehearing E.L. Wilson speakon biology.”“Fleshed out with somemodifications, ‘The MaryCase’ is an extremely con-vincing argument to doubtthe physicality of conscious-ness, which I found stun-ning,” Carter said. “Jackson’sMary Case formulated thisproblem that people havebeen asking for centuries ina very tangible way.”Alter has done muchresearch on Jackson’s workand was responsible fororganizing his lecture atthe University.“I’ve spent much of my lifeworking on concepts that heformulated,” he said. “I wasglad that he accepted.”The lecture will be a greatopportunity for studentsto learn more about thephilosophy of the mind froman expert in the field, saidAlter and Carter.“I believe that Dr. Jacksonwill make it clear to some-one without a background inphilosophy what the problemfacing philosophers todayis,” Alter said. “If you haveany interest in the philoso-phy of the mind, I think youwill want to hear from some-one who has made majorcontributions to the field.”Carter echoed thosesentiments.“I think anyone interestedin problems about conscious-ness – of which there aremany, both scientifically andphilosophically – will get alot out of the talk, as well asanyone who has even a pass-ing interest in philosophy,”he said.
Philosopher to speak on science of consciousness
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Tuesday, October 30, 2012
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IF YOU GO...
What:
The Problemof ConsciousnessRevisited
Where:
Smith Hall205
When:
Tuesday,7:30 p.m.
Submitted
Dr. Frank Jackson
By Eric Yaron
Contributing Writer
With out-of-state studentenrollment on the rise, a newstudent organization wasrecently formed with thegoal of helping new out-of-state students to acclimatethemselves to life here atThe University of Alabama.The “49” plans to organizeseveral initiatives to helpstreamline the adjustment of out-of-state students to life atthe Capstone.“The ‘49’ was formed inOctober 2011 as a student orga-nization designed to reducethe number of out-of-statestudents that choose to leavethe University after failing tofully adjust to life on campus,”Douglas Fair, a founding mem-ber of the group, said. “Ourmission is to help out-of-statestudents become acclimatedto life on campus throughcommunity involvement andsocial events throughout theschool year.”The programs and initia-tives to be put into motionby The “49” will be draft-ed and approved by anindependent planning com-mittee referred to as TheAssembly. Comprised of twostudents from each state rep-resented at the University, TheAssembly will meet twice amonth in order to brainstormand vote on new ideas. Eachstate is currently representedwithin The Assembly with theexception of Maine and Utah.“I decided to jump on boardwith my friend from highschool, Douglas Fair, whenhe told me he wanted to forma group specifically for out-of-state students,” ElizabethCady, another founding mem-ber of The “49” and one of therepresentative members of The Assembly said. “I wentthrough rush and pledgedPi Beta Phi, which I holddear to my heart. However, Iwanted to be identified by theUniversity by more than justmy greek letters.”The organization plans tofocus on proposals that willbenefit out-of-state studentsand help to make them moreinvolved on campus throughsocial and community engage-ment events throughoutthe semester. The “49” willalso be partnering with theCommunity Service Centerand the Veterans AffairsCenter for upcoming serviceopportunities. One such pro-posal is a plan to match out-of-state freshman studentswith students from their homestates to help with adjust-ing to collegiate life duringthe fall semester.Known as the foUndAtion,the program is a new men-toring initiative designed bymembers of The “49” as a wayfor older out-of-state studentsto introduce younger out-of-state students to life at theCapstone. Mentors will taketheir assigned “mentees” tovarious events on campus andprovide them with advice onclass selection and generalinvolvement on campus.“The foundation is uniqueto this campus with no groupin the Southeastern regionquite like The ‘49,’” Cady said.“It is a student-based mentor-ing program solely focused onmaking sure that our out-of-state freshmen get acclimatedand feel comfortable here inTuscaloosa. It is our hope thatthis project helps to drastical-ly decrease the number of stu-dents who decide to transferafter freshman year.”Students with additionalquestions or who are inter-ested in becoming involvedwith The “49” can join onFacebook at “The 49 StudentOrganization” or canemail the organization atthe49org@gmail.com.
Out-of-state students find home in new club The ‘49’
[The ‘49’] is a student based mentoring program solely focused onmaking sure that our out-of-state freshmen get acclimated and feelcomfortable here in Tuscaloosa. It is our hope that this project helpsto drastically decrease the number of students who decide to transferafter freshman year.
— Elizabeth Cady

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