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In My Father's Garden; A Daughter's Search for a Spiritual Life

In My Father's Garden; A Daughter's Search for a Spiritual Life

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Published by Workman Publishing
Kim Chernin's mother was a leftist firebrand, an American Marxist at mid-century, when it was dangerous to be one. Her father, a quiet man, was no less radical. Why then, decades later, does their daughter--a liberal California psychoanalyst and writer--find herself drawn toward a spirituality that would have shocked her parents? Through three personal stories, Chernin tackles the questions that pull at all of us: how to make sense in a world whose order isn't always apparent, and how to find balance between the mind and the spirit. "Kim Chernin writes with immediacy and intimacy."--City Life, London.
Kim Chernin's mother was a leftist firebrand, an American Marxist at mid-century, when it was dangerous to be one. Her father, a quiet man, was no less radical. Why then, decades later, does their daughter--a liberal California psychoanalyst and writer--find herself drawn toward a spirituality that would have shocked her parents? Through three personal stories, Chernin tackles the questions that pull at all of us: how to make sense in a world whose order isn't always apparent, and how to find balance between the mind and the spirit. "Kim Chernin writes with immediacy and intimacy."--City Life, London.

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Publish date: Jan 7, 1996
Added to Scribd: Oct 30, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781616202248
List Price: $17.95

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12/09/2014

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9781616202248

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Publishers Weekly reviewed this
For most of her life, Chernin (Crossing the Border, 1995), a psychoanalyst now in her mid-50s, has considered herself her "mother's daughter‘stormy, revolutionary." But, she declares in this affecting and intimate memoir, as she grows older she finds that she is "perhaps my father's gentle, dreamy child even more." As she has grown away from her mother's once dominating influence (expressed, for example, in Chernin's In My Mother's House, 1983), she also has found herself rejecting her parents' Marxism in favor of belief in "an unseen order." Chernin tells three "stories" here to explain her evolution and views. As a daughter, she re-examines her father's capacity for worship and finds that she is now drawn to how he expressed his love for the world through unobtrusive acts of caring and through his tending of his garden. As a therapist, she takes on the responsibility of guiding a cancer-stricken middle-aged woman through the process of dying. As a seeker, she dares follow an impulse to travel to Germany to meet the spiritual sage Mother Meera (erstwhile guru to both Andrew Harvey and Mark Matousek). Speaking to those who believe that only "politics of total commitment on a grand scale" matter, Chernin proposes that personal efforts can transmit effects in ways unimaginable, through "the mysterious consequence generated from small acts of engagement with the world." This is, to Chernin, the basis of a new "spiritual politics"‘for which, in her honest, fluent book, she proves to be a passionate and gifted spokesperson. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

1996-05-27, Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly reviewed this
For most of her life, Chernin (Crossing the Border, 1995), a psychoanalyst now in her mid-50s, has considered herself her "mother's daughter‘stormy, revolutionary." But, she declares in this affecting and intimate memoir, as she grows older she finds that she is "perhaps my father's gentle, dreamy child even more." As she has grown away from her mother's once dominating influence (expressed, for example, in Chernin's In My Mother's House, 1983), she also has found herself rejecting her parents' Marxism in favor of belief in "an unseen order." Chernin tells three "stories" here to explain her evolution and views. As a daughter, she re-examines her father's capacity for worship and finds that she is now drawn to how he expressed his love for the world through unobtrusive acts of caring and through his tending of his garden. As a therapist, she takes on the responsibility of guiding a cancer-stricken middle-aged woman through the process of dying. As a seeker, she dares follow an impulse to travel to Germany to meet the spiritual sage Mother Meera (erstwhile guru to both Andrew Harvey and Mark Matousek). Speaking to those who believe that only "politics of total commitment on a grand scale" matter, Chernin proposes that personal efforts can transmit effects in ways unimaginable, through "the mysterious consequence generated from small acts of engagement with the world." This is, to Chernin, the basis of a new "spiritual politics"‘for which, in her honest, fluent book, she proves to be a passionate and gifted spokesperson. (July) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

1996-05-27, Publishers Weekly
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