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11.1.12

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Thursday, November 1, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 49
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................7
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .....................12Puzzles .................... 11Classifieds ...............11
Clear
70º/46º
Friday 81º/52º
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NEWS
PAGE 6 Art display draws crowd to theCrimson Promenade
ART STROLL
NEWS
| GUY BAILEY RESIGNATION
60 DAYS
CW Staff 
University of AlabamaPresident Guy Bailey announcedWednesday that he would resignfrom his position as Universitypresident because of his wife’shealth.The announcement circulatedin a campuswide emailed state-ment.“Today, I have notifiedChancellor [Robert] Witt that Iam stepping down as presidentof The University of Alabama,”Bailey said. “This is a decisionmy wife Jan and I made togetherafter much discussion about howwe can best address her health,which is the most important pri-ority in our lives.”Bailey, who previously servedas Texas Tech University presi-dent from August 2008 to July2012, was chosen as the UApresident in July by the Boardof Trustees after former presi-dent Robert Witt stepped downin March to replace MalcolmPortera as chancellor of the UAsystem. Bailey was sworn in aspresident on Sept. 4, serving 60days in the position.“I respect and appreciatePresident Bailey’s decision,”Witt said in the same emailedstatement. “His priorities reflecthis commitment to both hiswife Jan and The Universityof Alabama. He and Jan willremain in our prayers.”Bailey’s wife Jan Tillery-Bailey has been diagnosedwith cancer at least twice inthe past and is a two-time sur-vivor, according to a LubbockAvalanche-Journal report from2008.Chris Cook, the managingdirector of communicationsand marketing at Texas TechUniversity, said her health hadbeen problematic for years.“I don’t know the specifics, butI know she had health issues andthat was very important to him,”Cook said. “She has these healthissues, and they’re very atten-tive to those. From what he saidin the statement, it’s clear thatthey have decided that they needto focus on those issues, under-standably so. I don’t know anyspecifics about it at this moment.He kept a lot of it private andrightfully so, but everyone wasaware that she had health issueswhile he was at Texas Tech.”Debbie Lane, assistant to thepresident and assistant vicepresident of University rela-tions, said in a prepared state-ment that the University wasaware of Tillery-Bailey’s healthcondition.“Mrs. Bailey was critically illthis summer, and the Baileys’priority for the foreseeablefuture is focused on her contin-ued health,” Lane said.
Bailey resigns to attend to wife’s health
By Mazie Bryant 
Assistant News Editor
The University of AlabamaBoard of Trustees will discussPresident Guy Bailey’s requestto resign in a closed executivesession Thursday, Nov. 1. Theboard will hold an open pub-lic meeting around 1 p.m. inSellers Auditorium to addressthe issue of changing admin-istration, Kellee Reinhart, UASystem spokeswoman said.Bailey announced his resig-nation in an emailed statementon Oct. 31, citing the health of his wife, Jan Tillery-Bailey, asthe reason for the decision.Bailey will continue to serveas president of the Universityuntil the Board of Trustees for-mally accepts his resignation,Reinhart said.“The board will not declineDr. Bailey’s request,” Reinhartsaid. “They will lay out thenext steps in succession for theUniversity’s president.“I don’t have details on herhealth. She is ill, and it hasbeen a big concern for Dr.Bailey and his family. We wishher a speedy recovery.“I fully expect the Boardto accept his resignation.Everyone is highly respectfulof Dr. Bailey and his wife andtheir private situation.”The Board of Trustees sentout a new schedule Wednesdaythat reflects the revisions totheir meetings Thursday andFriday.
 Trustees ready to accept resignation
Follow @CW_Live on Twitter duringthe Board of Trustees meeting to get liveupdates as they are expected to accept his resignation.
 TWITTER| Board of Trustees meeting
Area in detail
Bryant ConferenceCenter
CW File
By Meredith Davis
Contributing Writer
Creative Campus is debut-ing a new student publication,“Art-let,” showcasing visualart and creative writing. Thesmall booklets will be availablein convenient locations aroundcampus and are meant to con-nect students through creativity.“Art-let” provides an opportu-nity for artists and writers of allmajors to have their work pub-lished.The idea for “Art-let” formedwhen Emma Fick, a seniormajoring in English and CreativeCampus intern, returned froma trip to Italy, where she cameacross pamphlets of art andwriting at subway stops.“I wanted to see somethingsimilar on campus; I was simplywaiting for the right time andplace to share the idea,” Ficksaid.She pitched the idea for “Art-let” to the Creative Campusintern body at the beginning of the fall semester. The idea hassince taken off, inspiring a teamof interns to come together andbring the publication to life.“Thanks to the new interns’enthusiasm and dedication,‘Art-let’ hit the ground runningand hasn’t slowed down yet,”she said.The publication is intendedto reach students during theiridle time on transit or in theFerguson Center.“By targeting distributionlocations that all studentsinteract with, regardless of thedegree they’re pursuing, wehope to neutralize our reader-ship audience,” Fick said.Currently, the publicationis set to debut in November.Depending on submissions,“Art-let” hopes to publish mul-tiple times for the durationof the 2012-2013 school year.Submissions are being collectedby the English Honors SocietySigma Tau Delta and Slash PinePress.“‘Art-let’ does not seek to pro-vide art and writing for artistsand writers; it seeks to provideart and writing for Alabamastudents
 ,
” Fick said.Katharine Buckley, a sopho-more majoring in studio art andproject leader for “Art-let,” saidif the initial publication is suc-cessful, they’ll look to partnerwith other student organiza-tions.“It is, as of now, a project forthis school year, but I think if it’s received well by the studentbody and we are able to findother organizations to partnerwith, we could continue to pub-lish ‘Art-let’ over the years,”
New publication ‘Art-let’ gives students opportunity to be published
Pamphlet projectinspired by Italy trip
CULTURE
| CREATIVE CAMPUS
NEWS
| GREEK LIFE
Slur on KD Halloween decoration prompts conversation
SEE
BAILEY
PAGE 2SEE
ART-LET
PAGE 2
‘Art-let’ does not seek to provide art and writing for artists and writers; itseeks to provide art and writing for Alabama students.
— Emma Fick
By Melissa Brown
News Editor
A lawn decoration featuringhomophobic language postedat the Kappa Delta sororityhouse Tuesday has prompteda national apology and conver-sation between the greek andLGBTQ communities on TheUniversity of Alabama campus.On Tuesday, a picture of atombstone decoration reading“Freshman died Being dodge-ball dikes [sic]” circulated socialmedia. The sign appeared to beposted at the start of KD’s frontsidewalk at the chapter houseon campus.Noah Cannon, president of Spectrum, the LGBTQ organi-zation at the University, saidWednesday that while thelanguage is inexcusable, he isappreciative of the cooperationwith KD following the publica-tion of the photo.“The use of hate speech byselect members of Kappa Deltasorority this weekend is hor-rifying,” Cannon said. “KappaDelta leadership brought thisincident to our attention, andSpectrum leadership was gra-ciously welcomed to speak atWednesday night’s chaptermeeting at the Kappa Deltahouse.”Pamela Nix Elms, the execu-tive director of the Kappa Deltasorority, released a statementWednesday afternoon on behalf of the national organizationand the local chapter. Elms saidthe national chapter is workingwith campus representativesto foster cultural sensitivityamong chapter members.“I want to express my sincereapology for the offensive signthat appeared on the lawn of the KD chapter house at TheUniversity of Alabama thisweek,” Elms wrote. “It was notacceptable and does not alignwith our values. We want youto know that we are addressingthe situation with the chapterand the members involved.”Capstone Alliance, theUniversity’s LGBTQ faculty,staff, and graduate studentorganization, released a state-ment Tuesday, stating that hatespeech is not tolerated underany university policy.“That the event occurredin residential space does notremove the University fromaccountability; it was perpetrat-ed by and directed at Universitycommunity members whoreside on University property,”Capstone’s statement read.“That the event is connectedto greek organization does notwarrant a hands-off responsefrom the University; all studentgroups are held to the sameCode of Conduct and non-dis-crimination policies.”Meredith Bagley, an associ-ate professor in the communi-cations department, said shefound the “callous” languagehard to swallow Tuesday.
Kappa Delta’s national executive directorapologizes for UA chapter’s use of word
SEE
KD
PAGE 2
Jan Tillery-Bailey hashad cancer twice
Open meeting to beheld at 1 p.m. today
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
LUNCH
Salisbury Steak withMushroomsHome-style Spaghetti &MeatballsLima Beans with BaconHome-style Mashed PotatoesGrilled Vegetable PizzaSpinach Parmesan Quiche(Vegetarian)
 
LUNCH
Chicken creoleClassic Tuna SaladCinnamon French ToastStewed OkraSeasoned RiceCarrot Raisin SaladMu Shu Tofu (Vegetarian)
FRESH FOOD
LUNCH
Buttermilk Fried ChickenGrilled Sausage with Onions &PeppersBaked BeansSeasoned RiceGlazed CarrotsCreamed SpinachSummer Harvest Macaroni &Cheese (Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Chicken CreoleClassic Tuna SaladCinnamon French ToastStewed OkraSeasoned RiceCarrot Raisin SaladMu Shu Tofu (Vegetarian)
ON THE MENU
DINNER
Roast Beef Turkey Soup with BrownRiceLinguine with Roasted RedPeppersSautéed Zucchini & YellowSquashRoasted Red PotatoesTofu Fajita (Vegetarian)
LAKESIDEFRIDAY 
 What: 
CLC Movie Night:‘White Vengeance’
 Where: 
241 BB Comer
 When: 
6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
 What: 
How Great LeadersInspire Others to Take Action
 Where: 
G-54 RoseAdministration
 When: 
10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m.
TODAY 
 What:
 
Cavell Trio
 Where:
 
Moody MusicBuilding
 When:
 
7:30 p.m.
 What:
 
‘A New Brain’
 Where:
 
Allen Bales Theatre
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7:30 p.m.
 What:
 
Art Night inDowntown Northport
 Where:
 
Kentuck Art Center
 When:
 
5 - 9 p.m.
SATURDAY 
 What:
Moundville’s Saturdayin the Park
 Where:
 
MoundvilleArchaeological Park
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10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
 What:
 
Crimson Tide at LSU(On CBS)
 Where:
 
Tiger Stadium, BatonRouge, La.
 When:
 
7 p.m.
 What:
 
Victory 5K Run/Walk
 Where:
 
University RecreationCenter
 When:
 
9 - 11 a.m.
ON THE RADAR 
GO
GO
Page 2• Thursday,November 1, 2012
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
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BURKE
MCT Campus
Twenty-seven Air ForceAcademy cadets were injuredlast Thursday after a tradi-tional hazing event left somewith concussions, broken col-lar bones and cuts and bruises.One cadet suffered a humanbite on the arm, according toan email sent to academy staff by Brig. Gen. Dana Born, deanof cadets.The hazing, known as FirstShirt/First Snow, is an unof-ficial tradition that occursevery year on the first snow.Freshmen cadets try to throwtheir cadet first sergeant in thesnow, while the upperclassmentry to defend the sergeant.Born’s email indicated thatwhat was once a fun event has“turned into a brawl” and hasbecome increasingly violent inthe past two years.This year’s hazing sent sixcadets – those with concus-sions and broken collar bones– to local emergency roomsand left 21 others with minorinjuries, said John Van Winkle,an academy spokesman.
Van Winkle said the “tradi-tion,” which has since beencondemned by the academy,roughly dates to the 1980s.Many in the academy, includ-ing Van Winkle, had not heardof the event until the injurieswere reported. However, itis noted on an academy folk-lore wiki that describes it thisway:
“On the night of the firstsnow of the season, the smacksstorm the first sergeant’s room,kidnap him, strip him down tohis boxers and carry him out-side to drag him around in thesnow. Much like nuking, theseverity of the operation oftendepends on the standing of the first sergeant in the eyesof the smacks. A well-liked orwell-respected cadet first ser-geant will normally not getmuch more than the cermonialdragging-through-the-snow.A less-liked or less-respectedfirst sergeant may be bound,nuked in addition, or broughtto near-hypothermia.”Most of the academy’s 4,000cadets did not participate inthe hazing, he added.The academy is launchinga safety investigation into thehazing, Van Winkle said, add-ing that punitive action is notexpected.“We’re going consider thisa teachable moment,” saidJohn Van Winkle, an academyspokesman. “They are going tolearn from that situation.”The commandant of cadetstalked to freshman cadets onFriday and Saturday after theevent, emphasizing that thetradition “needs to stop andwill stop,” Van Winkle said.
27 Air Force Academy cadets injured inhazing
MCT Campus
It was a rough day on WallStreet for Apple Inc., whichsaw its shares decline as muchas 2.7 percent on the first dayof trading since the companyannounced a sweeping man-agement shake-up.Shares fell as low as $587.70on Wednesday morning. Theyrecovered slightly, closingdown $8.68, or 1.4 percent, to$595.32. Apple shares have slidmore than 15 percent sincereaching a high of $702.10 onSept. 19.On Monday the Cupertino,Calif., tech giant announcedthe departures of JohnBrowett, Apple’s head of retail,and Scott Forstall, who was incharge of the company’s wide-ly panned Siri and Maps appproducts.Forstall, a longtime execu-tive and protege of co-founderSteve Jobs, oversaw the iOSoperating system that runsiPhone and iPad. But the Appleveteran was also respon-sible for replacing GoogleInc.’s popular Maps app withApple’s own homegrown ver-sion, which has been plaguedby inaccurate informationand other problems sinceits September release. Chief Executive Tim Cook issuedan apology shortly afterwardand, in a rare move, encour-aged users to try alternativesoffered by rivals.Browett’s ouster came justsix months after he was hiredas Apple’s senior vice presi-dent of retail. The formerCEO of European technologyretailer Dixons took over forRon Johnson, who pioneeredthe look and feel of Apple’ssuccessful retail stores andleft last year to become CEO of J.C. Penney Co.Browett’s short stint withApple was reportedly shakyfrom the start. In August, hewas forced to issue an apol-ogy and reverse course on anew store staffing plan, whichwas rumored to include hir-ing freezes and cutbacks inworkers’ hours.The management reshuf-fling, Cook’s biggest sincebecoming CEO last year, alsobrings more responsibili-ties for Jonathan “Jony” Ive,Apple’s design chief; EddyCue, who runs Apple’s onlineservices; Bob Mansfield, whoretired this year but returnedto focus on “future products”;and Craig Federighi, whois now in charge of the Macoperating system.Separately, early reviews forApple’s long-awaited iPad Minihave started to trickle out.The 7.9-inch tablet com-puter has largely receivedsolid marks, although com-plaints about its non-”retina”display quality (the iPad Minifeatures the same screenresolution as the earlier gen-eration iPad 2) and high pricehave kept it from receivingglowing reviews.Wi-Fi-only versions of theiPad Mini begin shippingFriday; Minis that come withcellular data plans will shiptwo weeks later.Users will also have to waita bit longer for the latest ver-sion of Apple’s music player,iTunes 11, which was expectedin October. Apple is now say-ing it will become available inNovember.The update will add sev-eral features, change someportions of iTunes’ designand better integrate itwith iCloud, the company’scloud-computing service.“The new iTunes is takinglonger than expected, and wewanted to take a little extratime to get it right,” Applespokesman Tom Neumayrtold CNet. “We look forwardto releasing this new versionof iTunes with its dramaticallysimpler and cleaner interface,and seamless integrationwith iCloud, before the end of November.”The company also updatedthe portion of its website show-casing the upcoming iTunesupdate to read: “Coming inNovember.”Apple has been morefocused on hardware thansoftware in recent months,releasing numerous new Maccomputers and launching newiPods, the iPhone 5, the fourth-generation iPad and the newiPad mini.
Apple shares fall after management shake-up
 
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Thursday, November 1, 2012
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Page 3
By Madison Roberts
Staff Reporter
Most college freshmen areworrying about passing class-es, adjusting to college lifeand learning how to live ontheir own, but two Universityof Alabama students added anextra activity to the mix: pub-lishing a book.Anna Kathryn Davis, a fresh-man majoring in English, andErika E. Wade, a senior major-ing in English and AfricanAmerican studies, have bothexperienced the strugglesand perks of publishing majorworks as college students.“I think the hardest part of itwas when I was doing my hard-core editing; I was at BamaBound,” Davis said. “I cameto Bama Bound in the verybeginning of July, and I got myfirst copy of my edits, and myfinal copy edit started the dayI moved in. My first two weeksof classes I was also having tofinish editing my book.”Davis is in the process of publishing a young adult fic-tion novel titled “The Gifted,”which is currently in theprinting stage of publishingthrough Tate Publishing out of Mustang, Okla. Her novel is setto reach buyers within the nextmonth.Wade published a bookof poetry called “eyestode-whurld” during her freshmanyear at the University.“I was very active my fresh-man year in a lot of differentorganizations, and I just want-ed to have fun while trying towrite the book,” Wade said.“For the most part, I dedicatedone or two days out of the weekthat were specifically for com-posing and revisions and theother days, I did what I wantedto do.”An editor from Birmingham,Ala., who owns a publishingcompany contacted Wade dur-ing her freshman year. Afterthat, her book took flight,including multiple roundsof revisions and publicationmeetings.Davis, on the other hand,first submitted a manuscriptof her novel to her publishinghouse during October of hersenior year of high school andwasn’t expecting anything tocome of it. By December, shehad negotiated her contractwith the house and is currentlysigned to pub-lish three moreinstallments of the series.“It kind of picked me ratherthan me pickingit,” Davis said.“It was kind of like ‘oh we willsee what hap-pens’ and then ithappened. NowI will have four[novels] out, and I just want toscream, but it’s a good thing.”Wade is currently writingher second book of poetry,which she realizes is more dif-ficult than the first.“I’m working on numbertwo, and it’s a little harder thanfreshman year because I’ma lot busier and older,” Wadesaid.Davis said there are manydifficulties that come withbeing a published writer in col-lege and says it is important tohave her priorities straight.“It’s a lot of juggling, it’s a lotof not sleeping, and it’s a lot of to-do lists,” she said. “I am abig to-do list person. I don’t goto sleep until I finish the to-dolist. Some nights that meansgoing to bed at 3 a.m. and somenights are merciful and you getto bed by midnight, but thereare not a whole lot of earlynights.”Rachael Sweeden, director of operations at Tate Publishing,said the company has a 3 to 5percent acceptance rate formanuscripts. Davis recognizesthat publishing is a cutthroatindustry, and with such a smallacceptance rate, she was dis-couraged at first, but believesher impeccable timing is whatlanded her a book deal.“Publishing is more luckthan; it is talent,” Davis said. “Iwas very lucky with my timingand my house.They wererecently justbought out byanother compa-ny and the newcompany basi-cally cleanedout. They werelooking for newyoung adultpieces to expandthat genre, and I just happened tosubmit to them at a time whenthey were really looking forthe next good thing.”
Dealing with criticism
Although Davis is only 18years old, she said she has hadto learn to stand up for herself in the industry. She said criti-cism from other people doesnot discourage her, becauseshe has learned how to be con-fident in her work.“One of the greatest thingsI ever heard was from my edi-tor,” Davis said. “He said, ‘Don’ttake any advice on your book orthe way that you market yourbook from anyone who doesn’tstand to lose something in it.’The biggest thing I’ve learnedwith being so young is that youhave to be really able to standyour ground because peopleare going to try to tell you thatthey know more than you do,and you just have to say ‘yes,I’m young, but no you don’t. Iknow what I’m doing. This ismy piece.’”Wade faced similar disap-proval during her publicationexperience.“A lot of criticism I receivedwith the first book was that Iwas told I was too young to bea published poetry writer, andmy response to that was thatwriters are supposed to be ableto absorb the world as it is, andit doesn’t really matter how oldyou are,” Wade said. “It’s justyour interpretation of things.”Along with learning how todeal with criticism from out-side sources, Davis has hadto learn to deal with demandsfrom editors within her agency.She said she prefers publishingwith a national agency versusa smaller agency or self-pub-lishing, but she also admittedshe had second thoughts whenthey first started editing thenovel.“Bigger houses have theirbenefits because depending onthe house, you get a lot moreattention, and you can get itinto the book stores, but at thesame time, I did have to meettheir deadlines, their wordcuts. I had to cut scenes thatmaybe I wouldn’t have wantedto cut, but they were my houseand they’re funding it,” shesaid.As far as her plans for thefuture, Davis says she is leav-ing that up to God. She is cur-rently on a pre-med track andis excited to see where herbooks take her, but she is tak-ing each day as it comes. Afterall, she still has three years of college ahead.“I am in a very fortunatespot because I am here and I’mkind of in a safe zone wheremy mother is still taking careof me a great deal so I don’thave to do the whole ‘starvingwriter’ thing if I don’t make it,”Davis said. “I’m not starving. Ihave a meal plan.”
Students writing, publishing works of fiction, poetry
It was kind of like ‘oh we willsee what happens’ and thenit happened. Now I will havefour [novels] out, and I just want to scream, but it’s agood thing.
— Anna Kathryn Davis
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