P. 1
TakingCollegeCoursesinHighSchool

TakingCollegeCoursesinHighSchool

Ratings: (0)|Views: 421 |Likes:
Published by Scott Folsom
Taking College Courses in High School: A Strategy for College Readiness

Ben Struhl and Joel Vargas, October 2012
Taking College Courses in High School: A Strategy for College Readiness

Ben Struhl and Joel Vargas, October 2012

More info:

Published by: Scott Folsom on Nov 04, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

11/04/2012

pdf

text

original

 
TAKING COLLEGE COURSES IN HIGHSCHOOL: A STRATEGY FOR COLLEGEREADINESS
 THE COLLEGE OUTCOMES OF DUAL ENROLLMENT IN TEXAS
 O  C  O   0 
By Ben Struhl and Joel Vargas
 
Jobs for the Future
aligns education with today’shigh-demand careers. With its partners, JFFdevelops policy solutions and new pathways leadingfrom college readiness to career advancement forstruggling and low-income populations in America.
WWW.JFF.ORG
ABOUT THE AUTHORS
Ben Struhl
is a senior project manager for JFF’sStudent Information System project, part of theEarly College High School Initiative. The SISprovides information and analyses that help guidethe development and improvement of early collegeschools. Since joining JFF, Mr. Struhl has undertakenseveral research studies on how well early collegeschools are achieving their mission—helpingyoung people progress toward the education andexperience they need to succeed in life and a family-supporting career. Mr. Struhl’s experience spansacademic research, public policy development, andpolitical campaigning.
Joel Vargas
is vice president at JFF, leading the“High School Through College” team. He alsoresearches and advises on state policies to promoteimproved high school and postsecondary successfor underserved students. Since joining JFF in2002, Dr. Vargas has designed and implemented aresearch and state policy agenda for implementingearly college designs; created policy frameworks,tools, and model legislation; written and editedwhite papers, research, and national publications;provided technical assistance to state task forcesand policy working groups; served on a numberof national advisory groups; and organizedand presented at national policy conferences.He is coeditor of two JFF books:
Double theNumbers: Increasing Postsecondary Credentialsfor Underrepresented Youth
and
Minding the Gap:Why Integrating High School with College MakesSense and How to Do It
(both published by HarvardEducation Press).
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We could not have completed this research withoutthe diligent work of our research team at theEducational Research Center of The University ofTexas in Austin. A special thanks is due to MattGiani, who performed the data analysis in thisreport, and to Celeste Alexander, who oversaw theresearch work being done in Texas. Appreciationis also due to the Texas Education Agency and theTexas Higher Education Coordinating Board, whichprovided access to the data.Janet Santos should be recognized for completinga detailed, thorough companion research reportthat informed this work and provided context forour policy recommendations. In addition, we’d liketo thank Marc S. Miller, Cecilia Le, Cheryl Almeida,Melinda Karp, Cecilia Speroni, and our colleagues atEducate Texas for reviewing and providing valuablefeedback on this report, and to Rochelle Hickey forgraphic design.Finally, we would like to acknowledge the Bill &Melinda Gates Foundation for providing the fundingthat made this research possible.
PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF
South Texas College
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY vINTRODUCTION 1REVIEW OF PREVIOUS RESEARCH ON DUAL ENROLLMENT 3
LongitudinalOutcomestoCollegeDegrees3OutcomesforKeyStudentGroups5DifferencesinDualEnrollmentPrograms5
DUAL ENROLLMENT POLICY IN TEXAS 6RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY 8
DataandSample8TreatmentandComparisonGroups8Limitations10
THE FINDINGS IN DETAIL 11
CollegeOutcomes11OutcomesforSpecificDemographicGroups13OutcomesforDifferentCourseSubjects14OutcomesforCompletingMultipleCoursesBeyondtheFirst15OutcomesforTwo-yearandFour-yearColleges16
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE AND POLICY 17
ImplicationsforPracticeandStatePolicy17ImplicationsforNationalPolicyandResearch17Conclusion18
APPENDICES 20
Appendix1:PropensityScoreModel20Appendix2:Cohort,Treatment,andControlGroup,byRegion21Appendix3:EducationalAttainmentofTreatmentandControlGroups22Appendix4:TestScoresbyTreatmentandControlGroups23Appendix5:OddsRatiosforCollegeAccessModel24Appendix6:OddsRatiosforCollegeCompletionModel27Appendix7:Dual-creditStudyMethodology30
ENDNOTES 33REFERENCES 35
TABLE OF CONTENTS

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->