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11.12.12

11.12.12

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Monday, November 12, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 54
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................9
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .....................10Puzzles ....................13Classifieds .............. 13
Chance of T-storms
59º/36º
Tuesday 55º/36º
Clear
 
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NEWS
| STUDENT LIFE
CULTURE
| BEER
SPORTS
| FOOTBALL
NEWS
| VETERANS
By Zac Al-Khateeb
Staff Reporter
The stunning upset of theNo. 8 Texas A&M Aggies overthe No. 4 Alabama CrimsonTide shook up the BCSrankings Saturday, movingAlabama out of the primeposition for a spot in the BCStitle game.The Tide, ranked No. 1in the BCS rankings head-ing into Saturday’s game,fell to No. 4 after its loss tothe Aggies. With the loss,Alabama’s chances at givingthe Southeastern Conferencea seventh-consecutive nation-al title have greatly dimin-ished.Even with the blemish onits record, however, Alabamastill has a slim chance tomake the BCS NationalChampionship game inMiami. To do that, the Tideobviously needs to remainundefeated for the rest of theseason.
Hoping for another miracle
By Chandler Wright 
Staff Reporter
Every week, some UAstudents have to make avalue judgement. Shouldthey pay for heat, rentor food? For at leasta few, food loses out.“I would say that we prob-ably come in contact with,over the course of a week,two or three students whomay come to our office whohave an issue that may leadto hunger,” Lowell Davis,the assistant dean of stu-dents, said. “For example,we may have a studentwho has trouble payingtheir rent or not being ableto pay for a book, and theseoften uncover numerousissues.”Davis said when stu-dents come into the Officeof the Dean of Students,faculty members some-times use their own per-sonal funds to help stu-dents buy groceries.“We don’t have a formalstructure in place to sup-port these students, but Ithink people on campus just have a heart, and sowhen they see a studentwho has a need, they’rewilling to help them,”Davis said. “My personalwish would be that theDivision of Student Affairswould have money thatthey can allocate to helpour students in need,instead of hunting aroundfor money.”Lisa Bochey, the directorof hunger and homeless-ness at the CommunityService Center, said often-times, students may havehousing and school paidfor, but don’t have moneyfor food.
Some UA students go without food
Alabama could stillmake it to title game
SEE
FOOTBALL
PAGE 11
BCS STANDINGS
1. Kansas State2. Oregon3. Notre Dame4. Alabama5. Georgia6. Florida7. LSU8. Texas A&M9. South Carolina10. FSU
CW | Shannon Auvil
Students react to Texas A&M’s interception of AJ McCarron’s pass on the 2-yard line in the final minutes of the game.Beat WCUand Auburn
#RoadtoMiami
The Alabama Crimson Tide still has a chance at its 15thnational championship. Here’s how.Beat Georgia in theSEC ChampionshipTwo of the top threeteams lose at least onegame Alabama does not make it to Miami
 YesYesNoNoNo
 Alabamagoes toMiami
 Yes
Student Affairs can help by ‘huntingaround for money,’ scholarship offers
SEE
HUNGER
PAGE 2
By Nathan Proctor 
Staff Reporter
Beer and science mayseem incompatible.That is, until the topic of how beer is made comesup. “Fermentation sci-ence,” as it’s known,could even become acollege major.Variations of fermen-tation science havebegun sprouting up oncampuses across thenation, providing stu-dents the opportunityto delve into the sciencebehind the processesgoverning productssuch as cheese, yogurtand, of course, beer.“I’m a beer drink-er, and I enjoy gour-met beer,” KevinShaughnessy, headof The University of Alabama chemistrydepartment, said. “I’msure that [the major]would be popular withstudents here from acareer standpoint aswell as from a generalinterest in the subject.”Though Shaughnessyknew little of the majorspecifically, he said hehas experience read-ing about brewing, hasfriends who brew andis familiar with thegeneralities of the sci-ence.He said the big-gest difficulty in theUniversity hostingsuch a program wouldbe finding faculty withexperience in the field.He outlined a pathwayof developing studentinterest, finding aspace within the fac-ulty, seeking fundingand, chiefly, researchto add to the Universityand college’s academicgrowth.However, he notedthe college’s currentresearch focus liesheavily around themedical field, energysolutions, public healthand sustainability. Hedid suggest the studymight find a home inmicrobiology studiesand chemical engineer-ing.According to theirwebsite, the fermen-tation science optionat Oregon StateUniversity, hosting oneof the premier pro-grams in the UnitedStates, runs theirprogram out of theirCollege of AgriculturalSciences in the depart-ment of food sciencesand technology.
Colleges nowoffer major infermentation
Professor thinksoption could bepopular at UA
Iraq veteran earns degree online while abroad
By Chandler Wright 
Staff Reporter
Dara Warren always man-aged to complete her schoolassignments, even while beingdeployed to Afghanistan andIraq as a military nurse.“When I worked in Iraq, myhospital was a tent. We workedsix days of the week, and youstayed busy; and if you’re notworking, you’re sleeping. A lotof people are in school whilethey’re deployed,” Warren said.“The Internet is amazing.”After Warren graduatedwith her bachelor’s degree innursing from The Universityof Alabama, she joined the U.S.Air Force to work as a militarynurse.“After I graduated with mybachelor’s, I was working fulltime, and the environment of the military just made sense.The opportunity to travel anddo something different andunique and the educationalopportunities drew me to it,”Warren said. “That’s why Ichose that route. I’ve been infor nine years since then,1 andI’ve had a lot of really greatexperiences that I would neverhave had if I wasn’t a militarynurse. I’ve had an opportunityto do travel nursing, but in adifferent kind of way.”After Warren’s first deploy-ment to Iraq, she wanted topursue a master’s program innursing at the University, eventhough she was concernedabout being able to completethe rigorous coursework.
Submitted
Dara Warren is currently working on her Ph.D. online.
CW | Daniel Roth
Oregon State University has the premier program for fermentation of products such as beer and cheese.
SEE
BEER
PAGE 9
Military nurse Dara Warren joined U.S. AirForce after attending UA, seeks her Ph.D
SEE
VETERAN
PAGE 6
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
LUNCH
Beef BurgundyBacon, Tomato & CheeseSandwichFresh Vegetable LinguineAlfredoButtery Egg NoodlesRoasted Corn & Potato Soup(Vegetarian)
FRESH FOOD
LUNCH
Chicken EnchiladaBreaded Pork ChopChicken Gumbo with BrownRiceBaked Macaroni & CheeseDeep Fried OkraTortellini with Pesto(Vegetarian)
ON THE MENU
DINNER
Middle Eastern GyroPepperoni PizzaHamburgerOriental Beef Noodle SoupFrench FriesSpicy Vegetable Lo MeinGarden Burger (Vegetarian)
LAKESIDETUESDAY 
 What:
Battle of the Branches:Video Game Tournament
 Where:
1 B.B. Comer Hall
 When:
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
 What:
Study Abroad InterestSession
 Where:
Riverside ClubhouseMedia Room
 When:
7 - 9 p.m.
 What:
University Singers
 Where:
Moody MusicBuilding Concert Hall
 When:
7:30 p.m.
TODAY 
 What:
 
Battle of the Branches:Trivia
 Where:
 
Ferguson CenterEast Dining Hall
 When:
 
5:30 - 7 p.m.
 What:
 
Resident AdvisorInterest Session
 Where:
 
Burke Hall West
 When:
 
6 - 7 p.m.
 What:
‘Misalliance’
 Where:
 
Gallaway Theatre
 When:
 
7:30 p.m.
 WEDNESDA
 What:
 
Battle of the Branches:Community Service
 Where:
VA Medical Center
 When:
 
12 - 4 p.m.
 What:
 
The Death Penaltyfrom a Social JusticePerspective
 Where:
 
111 ten Hoor Hall
 When:
 
6 - 7 p.m.
 What:
 
Spanish ScrabbleTournament
 Where:
 
Lloyd Hall
 When:
 
6:30 p.m.
ON THE RADAR ON CAMPUS
GO
GO
Page 2• Monday,November 12, 2012
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036Advertising: 348-7845Classifieds: 348-7355
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Territory Manager 348-2598Classified Manager 348-7355
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Special Projects Managerosmspecialprojects@gmail.com
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348-8042Creative Services Manager
Robert Clark 
348-8742
Emily Diab
348-8054
Chloe Ledet
348-6153
Keenan Madden
348-2670
 John Wolfrom
348-6875
 Will Whitlock 
348-8735
 Amy Metzler 
osmspecialprojects2@gmail.com
 Will Tucker
editor-in-chiefeditor@cw.ua.edu
 Ashley Chaffin
managing editor
Stephen Dethrage
production editor
Mackenzie Brown
visuals editor
Daniel Roth
online editor
Melissa Brown
news editornewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Lauren Ferguson
culture editor
Marquavius Burnett
sports editor
SoRelle Wyckoff
opinion editor
 Ashanka Kumari 
chief copy editor
Shannon Auvil
photo editor
 Anna Waters
lead designer
 Whitney Hendrix 
lead graphic designer
 Alex Clark 
community manager
 
Daniel Roth 
magazine editor
FOLLOW US ONTWITTER@THECRIMSONWHITE VISIT US ONLINE ATCW.UA.EDU
LUNCH
Grilled Flank SaladAsian Pepper SteakSpinach Dip & Pita ChipsScalloped PotatoesPinto BeansWhite RiceRoasted Garlic & VegetableFlatbread (Vegetarian)
DINNER
Chicken AlfredoGrilled Steak SaladChicken SaladSausage PizzaGrilled Vegetable PizzaCheddar Cauliflower SoupPenne Pasta Salad(Vegetarian)
BURKE
“Many students whoreceive federal aid or grantsto attend the Universityoften struggle with payingfor things that they do nothave substantial funding for,such as money for food andgroceries,” Bochey said. “Itis tough to say exactly howmany students deal with thisproblem, as these studentsoften do not openly speakabout it. Many people donot realize that it is not onlyindividuals who are home-less that struggle with thisissue.”Davis said the Office of the Dean of Students tries totalk to the Office of StudentFinancial Aid to see if a stu-dent qualifies for a scholar-ship that can cover the cost,but sometimes, a studentmay already have aid.“We kind of assess thesituation,” Davis said. “Wewill contact Financial Aid tosee if there is any additionalneed that they can receive,or if they’re maxed out, thenwe try to find scholarshipsfor the students.”Even when the Office of the Dean of Students findsscholarship money for a stu-dent, Davis said the moneydoesn’t always show upquickly enough.“Oftentimes, scholarshipmoney does not help thesestudents immediately. That’sthe challenge. It goes ontheir account, and it takesa few days, and meanwhile,they’re hungry or their heatis turned off,” Davis said. “If we’ve exhausted these chan-nels, we will give a studentgift cards to buy groceries orgas or car repairs – a numberof different things.”Elliott Bell, a StudentGovernment Associationsenator for the Collegeof Arts and Sciences, hasworked on the Student toStudent Meal Donation pro-gram with Bama Dining oncampus. The program allowsstudents to donate a mealplan meal to students inneed.“This is a program that hasnot received a lot of atten-tion over the years, and thisis reflected in the amount of meals that are donated,” Bellsaid. “Often, we have seenthat the number of mealsrequested has been greaterthan the amount of mealsdonated in a semester.”Bochey said the program ishelpful in addressing studenthunger, but students shouldbe able to donate more thanone meal per semester.“As many students do notuse all of their meals eachsemester, this is a greatprogram that allows thoseunused meals to go to gooduse,” Bochey said. “Theonly issue with this pro-gram is that students areonly allowed to donate onemeal per semester, no mat-ter how many leftover mealsa student has. If the limitwere higher, it would allowfor many more meals to bedonated each semester.”Bell said University admin-istration is doing a good jobaddressing the needs of indi-vidual students, but that thestudent community shouldcome together in support of their hungry peers.“I don’t think that theUniversity administration isthe only entity that shouldwork to address this prob-lem,” Bell said. “We have aresponsibility, as studentswithin this community, tohelp one another, to care forone another, and we shouldeach donate a meal. I thinkthat there are a few avenuesthat could be explored to befar more proactive about thesituation.”Davis also said he wouldlike to see more studentgroups getting involved andtrying to help their peerson campus.“I am sure that if I put aproposal together to our newpresident that she woulddefinitely be willing to comeup with some kind of waysto address the issues,” Davissaid. “Dr. Bonner has per-sonally supported studentswith these issues. However, Ithink these kind of programsare especially important forstudents to take charge of.”Bell said he hopes the stu-dent body works to help andempower hungry studentson campus.“We need to make surethat those students in needfeel empowered as individu-als and should not accepthunger as a fact of life hereat the University,” Bell said.“This is not merely a com-munity issue; this is a moralissue.”Students who would likemore information about theStudent to Student MealDonation program can visitbamadining.ua.edu.
HUNGER
FROM PAGE 1
About 3 students perweek report hunger
TUSCALOOSA, Ala. –Season ticket packagesfor the two-time defendingNCAA Champion Alabamagymnastics team’s 2013slate of home meets go onsale Monday, November12 through the AlabamaTicket Office.“We are really excitedabout our home schedulethis year,” UA head coachSarah Patterson said. “We’llface some of the best teamsin the nation in ColemanColiseum, where we haveone of the best atmospheresin all of collegiate athlet-ics. Our ladies are excitedabout competing in front of our fans, which are secondto none.”Season ticket packagesare $48 while groups of four or more and can pur-chase packages for $39apiece. Alabama facultyand staff can also pur-chase season ticket pack-ages for $39 apiece. TheCrimson Tide brings apowerhouse lineup of opponents to ColemanColiseum this season, start-ing with LSU and Kentuckyon back-to-back weekends,starting on Friday, January18. The Kentucky meet onFriday, Jan. 25, will be theTide’s annual Power of Pinkmeet, helping raise aware-ness in the fight againstbreast cancer.Alabama then faces in-state rival Auburn in acritical midseason clash atColeman Coliseum beforefinishing out its regular-season home schedule withUCLA and Oklahoma. TheBruins finished a tenth of a point behind Alabamaat last year’s NCAAChampionships while theSooners were the only teamto beat the Tide during the2012 regular season.Tickets will be on sale atthe Alabama Ticket Office(205.348.2262) located in thelobby of Coleman Coliseumand online at RollTide.com.
 Two-time defending NCAA champion Alabama gymnasticsseason tickets go on sale Monday, cost $48 per package
UA Athletics
FAMU has offered topay $300,000 to the fam-ily of drum major RobertChampion, who died aftera hazing aboard a charterbus in Orlando, Fla., lastNovember.But Pamela and RobertChampion Sr. were “insult-ed” by the offer and haverejected it, said the fam-ily’s attorney, ChristopherChestnut, who did not saywhat amount might beacceptable.“The family remains con-cerned that FAMU is nottaking this as seriously asit should,” Chestnut saidThursday.Trustees of Florida A&MUniversity directed theirlegal team a few months agoto try to settle the wrong-ful death lawsuit that theChampions filed earlier thisyear. Rick Mitchell, an attor-ney representing FAMU,provided the settlementdocument to the OrlandoSentinel on Thursday inresponse to a public recordsrequest.FAMU, a public university,can only offer a maximumof $300,000 without seekingapproval from the state.“Anything more wouldrequire a special actapproved by the stateLegislature,” Mitchell said.“It is our hope that thissettlement will be acceptedand can in some way help inthe healing process for theChampion family and theentire FAMU community.”Champion, a 26-year-oldstudent and drum majorin FAMU’s famed march-ing band, died Nov. 19, 2011,after being beaten aboardthe charter bus parked atthe Rosen Plaza hotel. Theband was in town to per-form at the annual FloridaClassic football game.The Champion familysued in July, accusing thenation’s largest historicallyblack college of enabling aculture of hazing to thrivewithin the Marching 100.The university counteredthat Champion willinglysubmitted to the hazing,violating Florida law andschool rules. FAMU lawyerspointed out that Championsigned a pledge oppos-ing the practice, and theyargued that the school andFlorida taxpayers shouldnot be held financially lia-ble.Peter Lake, a professorat the Stetson UniversityCollege of Law who hasclosely followed tragediesat Virginia Tech, Penn Stateand FAMU, said he was notsurprised the Championsrejected the settlementoffer.“I don’t think money isthe issue,” he said. “It’sreally about [the univer-sity] taking ownership of the tragedy. The family maybe after something morethan money: This is notgoing to happen to someoneelse’s kid.”Eleven former bandmembers have pleaded notguilty to participating in thefatal hazing and are await-ing trial dates. A 12th bandmember involved in thehazing – Brian Jones, 24, of Parrish, near Bradenton –was given a community ser-vice sentence after pleadingno contest Oct. 9.This week, FAMU filedcourt documents askingthe judge in the civil caseto take notice of commentsthat Chestnut made afterJones’ sentencing.Speaking to reportersoutside the courtroom atthe time, Chestnut said:“Mrs. Champion’s positionis this: If you were on thebus, you intended to haze.You’re not on a bus – anempty bus that’s runningat 9 p.m. at night – and notintending to participate inthe activity that’s plannedto take place.”FAMU contends theremarks are “bindingadmissions” that furtherprove the university’s argu-ment that the drum majorintended to participate inthe event that killed him. If the judge accepts that argu-ment, it could weaken thefamily’s claim.Circuit Judge WalterKomanski is scheduled topreside over a hearing Nov.
Robert Champion’s family rejects FAMU’s $300,000 settlementoffer in wrongful death suit related to hazing in marching band
MCT Campus
28 in the civil case in whichFAMU; the bus company,Fabulous Coach Lines; and busdriver Wendy Mellette hope topersuade the judge to toss outthe wrongful-death claims.The university’s Board of Trustees voted in August toseek mediation with the family,whose lawsuit, filed in OrangeCounty, accused school offi-cials of failing to “properlysupervise, train, discipline andcontrol the FAMU band.”But a mediation held inOrlando last week was unsuc-cessful, Chestnut said.He said Thursday that heplans to push the lawsuittoward trial.“We’re going to continueon litigating the case,” hesaid. “The jury will makethe decision.”
 
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Monday, November 12, 2012
N
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Page 3
CW Staff 
Members of the NationalPan-Hellenic Council wereunaffected by this year’s fra-ternity pledgeship cancellationdue to a distinct and separatemembership process from theinvolved greek organizations.The NPHC is acoordinating council of ninehistorically black greek-let-tered organizations, of whichthe University has seven.None of the NPHC fraternitiesor sororities at the Universitywere impacted by the cancella-tion of pledgeship because theydo not incorporate a pledgingprocess in their membershipeducation, Kat Gillan, directorof Greek Affairs, said.“In February of 1990, theeight major black fraternitiesand sororities unanimouslyagreed to replace pledging inNPHC organizations with a pro-cess called membership intake,which is what current-dayNPHC organizations partici-pate in,” Gillan said. “An infor-mational meeting, an applica-tion process, an interview – orseries of interviews – and anintensive educational processtypically characterize member-ship intake.”Unlike other greek organi-zations on campus, a group’snational chapter and theUniversity do not requireNPHC organizations to partici-pate in recruitment every yearwith a set quota of new mem-bers, Maceo Caudle, presidentof the council, said.“One year, an organizationmight take in 80 members,and then the next, they mayonly take four new members,”Caudle said. “No organizationhad University intake this fallthrough NPHC.”Similar to other greek orga-nizations’ recruitment, in orderto participate in NPHC mem-bership intake, certain guide-lines have to be met.“An individual must have aminimum 2.5 grade point aver-age to even be considered, andyou also cannot participate untilyou’ve earned at least 12 credithours at the University,” Caudlesaid. “Every organization has adifferent standard though, andthey can choose what membersthey would like to allow at theirown discretion.”Kiara Summerville, presi-dent of Alpha Kappa AlphaSorority, Inc., said the processfor joining a NPHC fraternityor sorority is very selectivewith specific requirementsbased mostly on serviceand scholarship.“The NPHC communitytakes pride in the traditionsof each of our organizationsand the value of the broth-erhood and sisterhood thateach organization exhibits,”Summerville said.AKA is a non-hazing orga-nization and it believes thatall existing and prospectivemembers have the right tobe treated with dignity andrespect, she said. The organi-zation was not affected by theUniversity’s decision to end IFCpledgeship activities.“We were sorry to hear thattheir process ended. However,we trust that UA took the nec-essary precautions to ensurethe safety of all membersinvolved,” Summerville said.David Daniels, presidentof Omega Psi Phi fraternity,said he was surprised bythe University’s decision toend IFC pledgeship.“NPHC was unaffected asfar as my knowledge, probablybecause we belong to an entire-ly different council on campus,”he said.Daniels said his fraternitylikes to be as discreet as pos-sible regarding their intakeprocess and cause an elementof surprise to the campus whennew members are initiated.Daniels said the processmainly consists of teaching andserves as a bonding opportuni-ty for incoming members.“Personally, I feel like thewhite fraternities’ suspen-sion caused such commotionbecause of the magnitudeof those affected,” Danielssaid. “If that were to happento NPHC frats, the percent-age of students affected orconflicted by it would be sig-nificantly smaller, resulting inless publicity.”
NPHC greek organizations unaffected by suspension
CW Staff 
University of Alabamastudents can opt in for SECChampionship game tick-ets beginning at 7 a.m. onMonday, Nov. 12, accordingto an e-mail from the UAathletic department.Students have until 5 p.m.on Tuesday, Nov. 13 to addthemselves to the request listfor one $60 ticket.The opt-in can be foundunder the home tab of myBama, and is available tocurrently enrolled studentswho have confirmed theirschedule for the fall semester.Students who received morethan three penalty points lastseason for upgrading, donat-ing or not using a ticket arenot eligible for post-seasontickets.The request list is not afirst-come, first-serve basis,but determines the earnedhour cut-off by demand.Tickets will be distributedaccording to the number of UA hours completed throughsummer 2012, with 80 per-cent going to undergraduatestudents and the remaining20 percent going to graduatestudents.On Wednesday, Nov. 14, theUA athletic department willinform students via e-mail if they are eligible to purchasetickets. Tickets can be pur-chased starting at 8 a.m. onThursday, Nov. 15 online orin person, and purchasingwill end on Friday, Nov. 16 at5 p.m.According to the AthleticDepartment e-mail, studenttickets must be picked upin person in Atlanta, Ga.Students must provide a gov-ernment-issued ID and theirUA Action Card to receive aticket. SEC Championshiptickets cannot be transferredto another individual, and willbe issued for one seat each asopposed to student block seat-ing in Bryant-Denny Stadium.
National Pan-Hellenic Council excluded from decision because membership process differs from IFC 
Opt-in for SEC tickets starts Monday
Personally, I feel like the whitefraternities’ suspension causedsuch commotion because of themagnitude of those affected. Ifthat were to happen to NPHCfrats, the percentage of stu-dents affected or conflicted byit would be significantly small-er, resulting in less publicity.
— David Daniels

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