Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
A Macbeth Blended Learning Environment

A Macbeth Blended Learning Environment

Ratings: (0)|Views: 154 |Likes:
Published by kstooshnov
ETEC 510 group project
ETEC 510 group project

More info:

Published by: kstooshnov on Nov 13, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/04/2012

pdf

text

original

 
Running head: MACBETH BLENDED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS
Proposal for a
 Macbeth
Blended Learning EnvironmentMadelaine Campbell, Meggan Crawford,Chris McKenzie, Christie Robertson& Kyle StooshnovETEC 510: Design of Technology-SupportedLearning EnvironmentsSection 66AUniversity of British ColumbiaJune 12, 2011
 
MACBETH BLENDED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT2
 
MACBETH BLENDED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
Key Frameworks 
In order to focus our activities, we came up with an overall objective that every unit mustwork towards: “The students will be able to recognize the importance of 
 Macbeth
by appreciating thetimelessness of the themes and the intricacies of the writing-style.” This is in keeping with Dick,Carey, and Carey’s (1990) systematic design of instruction, which stated that the first step of design isto decide what the students need to learn by the time they have completed the lessons.
Situation in Theoretical Text
As mentioned above, we used the systematic design of instruction (Dick, et al., 1990) todesign our lessons. After beginning with an overall goal, we shaped our lessons so that the skills andknowledge from one lesson were scaffolded onto subsequent lessons. We then adjusted our lessons tomeet the needs of the learners, in particular the English as a Second Language (ESL) learners. Finally,we created specific learning outcomes for each lesson and connected each specific outcome to our overall objective. As well, the online technologies were chosen specifically to enhance the learningenvironment, not to use technology simply for the sake of using technology. In other words, our teaching objectives guided our choice of technology (Ehrlich, 2008, p 273).We also considered Reigeluth’s (1999) argument for student-centered lessons where ateacher would be a “guide on the side” as opposed to a “sage on the stage”; therefore, every lessonaffords collaboration among the students, which will enhance their involvement and encourage them tothink deeply (Chickering & Gamson, 1987). In addition, the unit incorporates two of Chickering and
3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->