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CT Defense Industry 11 8

CT Defense Industry 11 8

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Published by Patricia Dillon
The Defense Industry in Connecticut

Sponsors This study was funded in part by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology, Inc.; MassDevelopment on behalf of the Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development; and The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation and The Newport County Chamber of Commerce.

About the Defense Technology Initiative Founded in 2003, DTI was originally created by the Massachusetts High Technology Council to protect Massachusetts’ military ba
The Defense Industry in Connecticut

Sponsors This study was funded in part by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology, Inc.; MassDevelopment on behalf of the Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development; and The Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation and The Newport County Chamber of Commerce.

About the Defense Technology Initiative Founded in 2003, DTI was originally created by the Massachusetts High Technology Council to protect Massachusetts’ military ba

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Published by: Patricia Dillon on Nov 13, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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The Defense Industry in Connecticut
UMass Donahue InstituteEconomic & Public Policy
i
Sponsors
This study was funded in part by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology, Inc.; MassDevelopmenton behalf of the Massachusetts Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development; and The RhodeIsland Economic Development Corporation and The Newport County Chamber of Commerce.
About the Defense Technology Initiative
Founded in 2003, DTI was originally created by the Massachusetts High Technology Council to protect
Massachusetts’ military bases through the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC)
process. Followingthat successful and nationally-recognized effort, DTI evolved into an economic development and sector
advocacy organization that represents the region’s leading defense technology firms, research labs,
universities, and military bases.Produced by the Economic and Public Policy Research Unit, University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute
 
Copyright 2012University of Massachusetts Donahue InstituteThe contents of this publication may not be reproduced without permission
.
 
The Defense Industry in Connecticut
UMass Donahue InstituteEconomic & Public Policy
ii
Letter
Dear Colleague:The Defense Technology Initiative (DTI) is pleased to release a set of three detailed state reports on theeconomic significance of the defense industry in New England. This document is one of three relatedreports, each of which focuses on Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island and is a follow up to theNew England Defense Industry Summary we released in June 2012. When these reports are viewedtogether, a clear sense of the interconnectedness of the New England defense technology cluster emerges.Copies of all state reports, conducted by the University of Massachusetts Donahue Institute, can be foundon our website, www.defensetech.net. 
The defense industry’s importance to the
Connecticut economy has only grown in recent years. In 2011,1,100 companies were awarded nearly $12.7 billion in Department of Defense (DoD) or the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) contracts, a 51% increase since 2003. These companies employ more than101,000 employees, which represents approximately 6.3% of employment in the state. These employeesexemplify industry expertise in precision manufacturing and sophisticated scientific and technical support,producing cutting edge ships, aircrafts, and specialty engines to the military. With large prime contractorslike United Technologies and General Dynamics, the state supports a complex and interconnected networkof small businesses and subcontractors throughout the region to supply high technology to our military.Yet today, defense firms are already adjusting to the current and potential (sequestration) defense spendingreductions that could total over $1 trillion dollars over the next 10 years. Without Congressionalintervention before January 2013, job losses throughout New England among contactors and the supplychain could total 90,000 jobs across New England and over 36,000 jobs in Connecticut.
Despite these cuts, opportunities exist. As illustrated in the three state reports, the Pentagon’s
focus onscience and technology, research and development, unmanned air systems and cyber security remain
aligned with New England’s strengths. A coordinated New England leadership effort is necessary in order to
take advantage of these opportunities, and to ensure that the region remains the leader into the future.I hope you find this report of interest and that it helps you fully understand the significant economic impactof the defense industry in Connecticut, and more broadly throughout New England.Best,Christopher Anderson Charlie BenwayPresident Executive Vice PresidentDefense Technology Initiative, Inc. Defense Technology Initiative, Inc.

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