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2011
Humboldt County, Iowa Thursday, November 15, 2012
$1.25
 Area churches
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Community calendar 
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Courthouse news
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Obituaries
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2 Sections Official newspaper of Humboldt County
Vol. 154 No. 26 USPS No. 254060
Blacktop Service Company of Humboldt wasapplying asphalt to 1
st
Avenue North on Friday, just north of the NEW Cooperative elevator. Theproject was part of the city of Humboldt’s 2012street improvement program. Humboldt Inde-pendent photo.The firing squad fired off three shots in memory of fallencomrades during the Veteran’s Day ceremony held Sundayat the VFW in Dakota City. Humboldt Independent photo.
Hear
nancialupdates
By Phil Monson
Over the last 10 years, theLuVerne and Corwith-Wesleyschool districts have workedhard to reduce spending tomaintain a viable school dis-trict.But bigger decisions appear to be just around the corner for both boards as they try to dealwith declining enrollment andthe corresponding reduction infunding.During a regular meetingof the LuVerne board on Nov.7, in which members of theCorwith-Wesley board werealso in attendance, School Su-perintendent Tom Fey updatedthe boards on their financialsituations.Budgets for the 2011-2012school year have been filedwith the Iowa Department of Education. Figures show theLuVerne district had a positiveunspent balance of roughly$55,000 on June 30, 2012. TheCorwith-Wesley district hada negative unspent balance of $124,666.State officials require dis-tricts to maintain an unspentbalance of 10-15 percent of their total budget, which al-lows districts to continue topay salaries and bills duringthe months of July, August andSeptember when little tax rev-enue is coming in.Fey says projections for the2012-13 and 2013-14 schoolyears don’t look better andschool officials will have tomake some hard decisions.“We had a nice discussionabout the viability of the dis-tricts and the future of the dis-tricts, from a financial senseonly,” Fey told the Indepen-dent afterwards.“Corwith-Wesley wentnegative unspent balance infiscal year 2011-2012 andLuVerne was positive. Butthe year before LuVerne hadbeen negative (-$30,000),”Fey said. “The only savinggraces we would have: 1) if our enrollment drastically in-creased, which it’s not goingto and we know that. We’reon a downward slide. 2) If thestate somehow throws a lot of money at us, which we knowthey are not going to do. 3) Or if our expenditures decreasesignificantly.”“Quite frankly, we can’t cutany more. We are offering agood, solid program. Every-thing the state mandates, weoffer. Any teachers we wouldcut, we would find ourselvesnot offering what we are re-quired to offer,” Fey said.“There is really no where tocut the amount of money wewould need to cut to be ableto continue long-term into thefuture,” Fey said.“I gave the boards somethings to chew on and we willmeet again here shortly andtalk about those things,” Feysaid. “I wanted to plant somethings into their heads so theycan start giving those thingssome thoughts.”“I’m very proud of bothboards. They understandwhere they are at and they un-derstand everybody our sizearound us has changed andwe’re about the last surviv-ing soul of our size,” Fey said.“We had a really good discus-sion of our current financialsituation and what we see inthe future.”Fey shared options availablefor the two boards to consider.“The only options allowedto a school district are whole-grade share with somebodyelse, dissolve the districts or re-organization with a neigh-bor. Those are the only threeoptions,” Fey said.“I want to make it clear thatthis is not going to happen to-morrow. This is a few yearsaway at the least because thereare timelines that have to bemet and decisions to be made.It will take a few years. But it’stime the boards look at all thefinancials and look at what ispossible to continue operatingin some way shape or formto best serve the students wehave,” Fey said.Fey, who has served bothdistricts on a part-time basisover the past 12 months, sayshe’ll continue to work withschool-wide principal JamesRotert to provide informationon options available.“I’m going to get the boardsome information on wholegrade sharing. The state has arestructuring manual that theboard will have to read clearlyso they know everything that’sin there,” Fey said. “The nextstep is becoming more in-formed of what the possibili-ties are.”Fey, mindful of cuttingmeasures the districts have un-dertaken over the last severalyears, says there is no moreroom for cuts to ensure long-term viability in offering aK-12 program.“We’d like to be able tosit down and try and comeup with more cuts for cost-savings, but there are no morecuts that we can make,” Feysaid. “We’ve got one bus routein Corwith. We have one cook.One custodian. One secretary.We’ve got a couple of multi-age classrooms where six or eight first graders and nine or 10 kindergarteners are in thesame room so we can have oneteacher instead of two.”“Our high school teachersare teaching full loads, butteacher-required. If we did cutsomething, we would not bemeeting state mandates,” Feysaid.
The 2012 Humboldt-Dakota City Chamber of Com-merce Lighted Christmas Parade will be on Saturday, Nov. 17, at 5 p.m.The parade route will begin by Northwest Bank, con-tinuing through Sumner Avenue into Dakota City, MainStreet. It will end at the VFW in Dakota City. A free will soup supper with Santa will conclude the evening.
By Kent Thompson
It was election day in Hum-boldt County Nov. 6, but notall of the politicians were sit-ting around waiting for the re-turns.Iowa Lt. Gov. Kim Reyn-olds was in north central Iowa,continuing a series of businessand industry visits around thestate.Last Tuesday’s stops wereat Hagie Manufacturing inClarion and Liguria Foods inHumboldt.Liguria is a producer of specialty meat toppings, pri-marily pepperoni.Liguria Foods managementand local Humboldt CountyDevelopment Association offi-cials took the lieutenant gover-nor on a brief tour of the plantfollowed by a short questionand answer session.Reynolds said Gov. TerryBranstad’s administration hasbeen successful in bringingstability back to the state. Shesaid the administration has es-tablished a budget surplus andis working toward comprehen-sive tax reform for residential,commercial and industrialclasses.“The corporate tax struc-ture in the state is not competi-tive. It needs to be revised,” Lt.Gov. Reynolds said.“If we can bring it down itwill expand and improve thebusiness climate for industrieslike Liguria Foods.”Reynolds said the Healthi-est State Initiative is a way tonot only improve the overallhealth of Iowans, but to reducehealth insurance rates anddecrease overall health carecosts.“That’s why the governor and I agreed to pay 20 percentof our health insurance costs.We want to empower Iowansto take ownership of their ownhealth and don’t believe tax-payers should be on the hookfor the entire cost of state-employee health insurance,”Reynolds said.Another big push is educa-tion reform. Reynolds is co-chair of the governor’s STEM(Science, Technology, Engi-neering and Mathematics) ex-ecutive committee.Reynolds said there are alot of opportunities for two-A new and improved web-site for Humboldt Newspapershas been launched, givingreaders the chance to subscribeto e-editions. The e-editionsare an exact replica of the printedition. People can access thesite at www.humboldtnews.com.The new website also en-ables people to subscribe or re-new their subscriptions to theHumboldt Independent onlinewith a credit card. Print sub-scribers automatically qualifyfor the e-edition of the news-paper free of charge. Currentprint subscribers can contactthe Humboldt Newspapers of-
 Lieutenant governor visits Liguria Foods
year degrees in specific STEMareas that can aid industrieslike Liguria Foods.She asked about the labor availability pool in the areaand if Liguria has difficultiesin finding workers.“Unemployment is about4 percent, so there has beensome issues in finding factorylabor. There is some increas-ing competition with the newplants opening in Fort Dodge,”Liguria Chief Financial Offi-cer (CFO) Paul Simkus said.“We are a United Food andCommercial Workers Inter-national Union plant and wehave a good working relation-ship with the union and lookforward to maintaining that,”Liguria Chief Executive Offi-cer (CEO) and President JehanSaulnier told the lieutenantgovernor.Liguria Vice PresidentGary Piearson said the com-pany has increased its startingminimum wage to $10.50 per hour with sizable increases af-ter 60 days and five months.“People can be making $14per hour within a few months,”Piearson said.“Business has been goodand revenue for specialty foodproducts has been growing,”Saulnier said.“Prices for our raw materi-als (pork trimmings) has beenvolatile, as has any animalprotein product. That’s largelybeen driven by the corn priceand that has been driven byethanol,” the CEO said.So far, any inflationaryprice trends have not been metwith resistance from Liguria’scustomers, largely indepen-dent pizza shop owners, whoreally favor the traditional red-wood smoked pepperoni Ligu-ria produces.“We just focus on our coreproduct and satisfying our cus-tomers. Fortunately, a lot of people eat a lot of pizza andpepperoni is the number onetopping sold on pizza,” Saul-nier said.“I read where 96 to 97 per-cent of the people in the coun-try ate pizza within the lastyear. I’m trying to figure outwho the other 3-4 percent are,”the CEO joked.“We have 1.8 millionpounds of pepperoni currentlyhanging in the plant,” Piearsonproudly states.“We slice about 600,000pounds per week,” Saulnier said.“We focus on providing abetter product and consistentlyhigh service and that seems towork,” Saulnier said.Liguria completed an $8million plant expansion two
GOP takesHumboldt County
Christianson re-elected to Supervisors
By Kent Thompson
Election night 2012 went pretty much as expected in Hum-boldt County, with few contested races and few surprises.It was a good night for Republicans as Mitt Romney andSteve King outpolled their Democratic challengers for presidentand U.S. representative.Romney defeated President Barack Obama in HumboldtCounty, 3,099 to 1,967. He won by a similar percentage in Kos-suth County. Statewide, Obama had the edge, outpolling Rom-ney by nearly 85,000 votes, putting Iowa’s six electoral votes in
See Liguria, 2ASee Election Results, 10ASee Future, 3ASee Website, 3A
 
2A
 
The Humboldt Independent 
 
Thursday, November 15, 2012
years ago and now has 143employees — a mixture of hourly wage workers and man-agement and office positions.“We haven’t been shy inreinvesting in the company,”Saulnier said.“We’ll be putting in about$2 million in capital improve-ments this year, so it’s prettysubstantial,” Piearson added.A USDA inspector exam-ines the company’s equipmentand processes daily to makesure Liguria is complying withall federal food safety require-ments.“Food safety emphasishas probably been the biggestchange during my 25 years inthe business,” Saulnier said.Reynolds concluded thevisit by thanking the Liguriaexecutives for their commit-ment to the Humboldt commu-nity and the state.“I want to thank you for your investment and expan-sion.“It’s businesses like your-selves that keeps Iowa grow-ing,” the lieutenant governor remarked.
Liguria
from front page
Iowa Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds and her staff visited Liguria Foods in Humboldt lastweek, part of a number of business fact-finding tours around the state the lieutenantgovernor has been conducting. Pictured from l to r: Jim Vermeer, Humboldt CountyDevelopment Association vice president, Gary Piearson, Liguria Foods vice presi-dent, Lt. Gov. Kim Reynolds, Jehan Saulnier, president and CEO of Liguria Foodsand Alissa Reinholdt, Humboldt County Economic Development director. HumboldtIndependent photo.
By Carolyn Ford
I would like to welcome allof you here today for attend-ing this very special occasionto honor our service memberspast and present and to re-member their sacrifices theyhave made and the courage ittakes to defend honor, duty,and country.I appreciate this oppor-tunity to speak to all of youabout something that is verynear and dear to my heart andthat is patriotism and love of country. We are here today tohonor our heroes, to remember their achievements, and to say“Thank You” for their sacri-fices. We are gathered here to-day in the midst of patriots andthe family and friends of thosewho have nobly served. I hopethat with this opportunity that Ihave been given, you will walkaway from this public gather-ing with renewed respect andlove for all military serving inall capacities in all parts of theworld.For nearly 250 years, menand women have underwrit-ten our freedom by their duty,honor, and selfless service.Through these nearly 250years we have experiencedwhat the author Andy Andrewscalls “The Butterfly Effect.”In this book Edward Lorenapresents a hypothesis to NewYork Academy of Science. Histheory, stated simply, was this:“A butterfly could flap itswings and set molecules of air in motion, which would moveother molecules of air, in turnmoving more molecules of air  – eventually capable of start-ing a hurricane on the other side of the planet.”Of course this idea waslaughed at, and thought to beridiculous. It is ridiculous butat the same time fascinating if you stop to think about it andapply it to our country and itsfreedom. The effect when ap-plied to our country’s historyalso resembles the dominoeffect. We have a history of conflict and war going back tothe Revolutionary War, Span-ish American War, Civil War,right up to the present day war in the Middle East. From eachof these wars, lessons havebeen learned, and the rewardshave been unique to each. Butthrough all of these, our free-dom of the United States of America has stood firm andunwavering. Through eachand every one of these wars,the symbol of our country,Old Glory, has flown proudand high. For this we as proudAmericans should forever begrateful. With the flag blowingproudly everywhere we go itcreates that “Butterfly Effect”that I mentioned before, andthe effects of that flag blowinghave been felt in many places,especially right here in our own country.I would like to share withyou a selection that was sent tome by my sister this past week.“Old Glory” was published inher local newspaper and this ishow it goes: 
 I am the American flag. Listen to me and I’ll tell youmy story. My colors are red,white and blue. I have a field of 50 stars and 13 stripes. I amalso known as “The Stars and Stripes” and “Old Glory.” I am honored to be in all public places. I go to schools wherethe children pledge allegianceto me. I attend all sportingevents and stand proud and  fly high as they sing my song,“The Star Spangled Banner.” I am honored when I go by ina parade and my people saluteme.Yes, I’m the American flag. I served under 40 some presi-dents. I was in peace and war. I was at the battle of Bunker Hilland Valley Forge where I sawthe soldiers starve and freezeto death. I was with GeneralWashington as he crossed the Delaware. I was in the CivilWar where I saw father and son, brother and brother fight against each other to savethe Union. I was there whenthey freed the slaves. I wasat Gettysburg with President  Lincoln, where in a few min-utes he gave the most famousspeech ever heard, “The Get-tysburg Address.” I went alongto the trenches in France inWorld War I, the beaches of  Normandy in World War II,the day which lives in infamyat Pearl Harbor, the sands of  Iwo Jima, where a few soldiers planted me in the sand to flyhigh with honor over them. I was in many wars and placeswith the people of my country.The farthest distance I havetraveled is to the moon where I’m also flying high to honor my country.I am the American flag. I stand for freedom, but freedomhas its price. Freedom doesn’t  prevail without tyranny. I wasdisgraced many a time. I wasspit on, stepped on, shot at and burned. I saw racism and oth-er violence in my country, but  I have overcome, for I fly over  America, the greatest countrythere is. A land of freedom, lib-erty, opportunities, a place todream and live your dreams,a land of bounteous blessings,a land of milk and honey. Aland to worship your Lord and  Master. If we would just openour eyes and hearts and be-lieve in God and ourselves wecould move mountains. What agreat country I stand for. I’m proud of my patriots. May theybe proud of me!I am the American flag. I am at the boot camp wherethe morning reveille is played. I am the cover over the casket when one of my servicemenor servicewomen who haveserved their country reachestheir final resting place. And  I’ll fly high with honor whiletaps are played for those whohave served their country and have paid the price. They gavetheir all so that I may fly free.Yes, I am the American flag. May I long wave over the land of the free and the home of thebrave.God Bless my Country!God Bless America! Long mayShe live!
As many of you alreadyknow, I wore a POW braceletduring and after the Viet Namconflict. I have had the greatpleasure of meeting and get-ting to know this very specialveteran. What a dynamic manhe is. The first time that I methim, I was able to thank himpersonally for his sacrifice for me and for this country. Hisresponse was this, “No thanksneeded. I was just doing my job.” This is the way it seemsto be with most veterans thatI have talked to. But I know inmy heart that even though theyhave hung up the uniform, theywill always be soldiers of thiscountry. Their sacrifices aretruly worthy of all the recog-nition and honor that they get,and yet they receive it so hum-bly.In closing I would like toshare one final story taken fromthe book
Chicken Soup for theVeteran’s Soul
. This story wasshared by John McCain, whoas we know was a POW in VietNam as well, along with myPOW. This story has to do withthe American Flag as well. It’scalled “Mike’s Flag.”
Mike was a Navy bombar-dier who had been shot downin 1967, about six months be- fore I arrived. He had grownup near Selma, AL. His familywas poor. He had not wornshoes until he was 13 yearsold. Character was their wealth. They were good, righ-teous people, and they raised  Mike to be hardworking and loyal. He was 17 when he en-listed in the Navy. As a youngsailor, he showed promise as aleader and impressed his su- periors enough to be offered acommission.What packages we wereallowed to receive from our  families often contained hand-kerchiefs, scarves and other clothing items. For some time, Mike had been taking littlescraps of red and white cloth,and with a needle he had fash-ioned from a piece of bamboo,he laboriously sewed an Amer-ican flag onto the inside of hisblue prisoner’s shirt. Everyafternoon, before we ate our soup, we would hang Mike’s flag on the wall of our cell and,together, recite the Pledge of  Allegiance. No other event of the day had as much meaningto us.The guards discovered  Mike’s flag one afternoonduring a routine inspectionand confiscated it. They re-turned that evening and took  Mike outside. For our benefit as much as Mike’s, they beat him severely, just outside our cell, puncturing his eardrumand breaking several of hisribs. When they had finished,they dragged him bleeding and nearly senseless back into our cell, and we helped him crawlto his place on the sleeping platform. After things quieted down, we all lay down to goto sleep. Before drifting off, I happened to look toward acorner of the room, where oneof the four naked light bulbsthat were always illuminated in our cell cast a dim light on Mike Christian. He had crawled there quietly whenhe thought the rest of us weresleeping. With his eyes nearlyswollen shut from the beating,he had quietly picked up hisneedle and thread and begansewing a new flag.This is Honor, and there areway too many people in thiscountry who no longer under-stand it.The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because heloves what is behind him.
A veteran is someone who,at one point, wrote a blankcheck made payable to “HISCOUNTRY” for an amount of “up to and including his life.”Again I say, “God bless myCountry. God bless America.Long may She live.”
Speech given during Veteran’s Day ceremony
By Phil Monson
Twin Rivers technologydirector Fred Johnson is step-ping down at the end of thefirst semester.During a regular monthlymeeting of the Twin RiversBoard of Education on Nov.8 in Bode, the board acceptedthe retirement of Johnson, whoserves the district on a part-time basis. Johnson’s depar-ture will be effective Dec. 21,2012.School Superintendent GregDarling says Johnson is goingto begin work in the privatesector. Darling said the dis-trict will utilize the services of Humboldt’s technology per-sonnel.In other action, the boardapproved participation in theDrug and Alcohol testing pro-gram for 2012-2013.The board also approved afive percent English LanguageLearning contingent with theHumboldt district, contingenton approval by the Humboldtboard at its Nov. 19 meeting.The board approved an ap-plication with the State Bud-get Review Committee for increasing enrollment, openenrollment out and excel LEPcosts.The board also approved alist of goals for the 2012-2013school year. Prior to the meet-ing, the board received a pre-sentation by preschool teacher Tricia Gargano, whose class-room this year is now locatedin the former home economicsroom in the Bode school.Gargano outlined the dis-trict’s preschool program andgave a presentation on theSmartBoard located in her classroom listing the goals of the program for students. Her class was previously held inthe outdoor portable building,which were abandoned, soldand moved off the Bode schoolgrounds during the summer.Principal Don Hasenkampreported on several topics.Hasenkamp said students re-ceived a bowling trip for reach-ing their reading minute goals.He discussed the 60-inch tele-vision that is now in the cafete-ria/gymnasium, which will beused for various educationalactivities for students.Hasenkamp said the IowaAssessments testing are cur-rently in process. He said par-ent-teacher conferences wentwell. He also noted fourth andfifth graders helped with theoutdoor landscaping project infront of the school on Oct. 24.Fencing near the play-ground west of the schoolbuilding has been installed.Hasenkamp also told the boardthat D.A.R.E. graduation willbe Dec. 6, for fifth graders.Superintendent Darling re-ported on AEA flow-throughmoney, which pays for profes-sional development and spe-cial education. Darling alsoupdated the board on certainservices the district maintainseach year.“Regulations require cer-tain services school districtshave to comply with. Any-thing from monitoring as-bestos, boiler guidelines, fireextinguisher requirements.There are a number of servicesschools have to comply with,”Darling said.The board approved thefirst, second and third readingof an extensive list of policyseries items.
TR technology director steps down
The Humboldt Area ArtsCommunity looks forward toyour support through atten-dance at the Art Encore thisSaturday, Nov. 17. The eventwill be held at Rustix Restau-rant and Reception with doorsopening at 6 p.m. Advancetickets are $15 for HAACMembers and $20 for non-members. Tickets sold at thedoor are all $20.Tickets are available atWitz End, Bank Iowa, HAACBoard members and the artcenter.Assorted appetizers pro-vided by Rustix and HAACvolunteers will be served from6:30-8:30 p.m. A wine andcash bar will be open through-out the evening. A youth silentauction will take place from6-8 p.m. The live auction startsat 9 p.m., with services donat-ed by Hundertmark Auction.Silent auction bids will closeat 11 p.m.Local musicians will per-form the first part of the eve-ning, including members of the Red Carpet Rebels. HAACthanks Jill Pliner for organiz-ing this part of the evening.Music by DJ Chris Cranwill finish off the evening from10 p.m.-midnight.This year’s Encore theme,“What a Feeling” will incor-porate assorted art themeditems with tactile appeal. Alsoon tap to be auctioned off arecommunity art pieces from the2011 and 2012 art festivals.Funds raised at the Encore2012 help support the arts inthe Humboldt community in-cluding: the annual art festivaland free activities for children,youth and art teacher scholar-ships, and free monthly ex-hibits at the area art center toname a few.The HAAC thanks you for your continued support!
 Art Encore planned for Nov. 17 
The city of Humboldt willallow open burning of yardwaste on Saturday, Nov. 17,from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. No burn-ing is allowed on the city rightof way. All fires must be at-tended.
Burning date
Hours: M-F 8:30am-4:00pm
Hours: M-F 8:30am-4:00pm
www.fsbwc.com
www.fsbwc.com
1301 6th Ave North, Humboldt • 515.604.6420 • Fax 515.604.6425
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We Are Here To 
Grow With You!
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Brandy, Rob and Jennifer are 
ready to serve all your Ag and
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If this is you, callHealthSource & see how we can help
H
OSPICE
L
IGHT
U
P
A L
IFE
 Monday, November 26 - 7 p.m. Humboldt County Memorial Hospital.Our Social Hour will be held INDOORS following the Lighting Ceremony.
A tax-deductible gift will light a bulb on the evergreen tree at the Path of LifeGarden. The light can be placed in memory of a loved one or in honor of anindividual who is of personal significance in the life of the contributor.Please join us for the Tree Lighting in the Path of Life Garden at 7:00 p.m. fol-lowed by the indoor activities in the Sun Room of the Long Term Care Unit of thehospital. These activities will include Entertainment, Reading of the MemorializedNames of Loved Ones and a Social Gathering.
Checks for a minimum of $10 per name are to be made payable to:
HOSPICE OF HUMBOLDT COUNTYBOX 183, HUMBOLDT, IA 50548
 Light Up a Life forms are available at the Humboldt County Memorial Hospital and Humboldt County Public Health. If you would like a form mailed to you, please call 515-332-2492.
Carolyn Ford gave the Address of the Day at the2012 Veteran’s Day ceremony. The ceremony was heldSunday in the VFW due to inclement weather. See morephotos at ww.humboldtnews.com. Humboldt Indepen-dent photo.
 
Thursday, November 15, 2012
 
The Humboldt Independent 
 
3A
“We are running on a barebones, no frosting on the cakeoperation. We’re doing a good job. Academically we are do-ing a great job and our testscores prove that. But there’sno areas where we can signifi-cantly cut,” Fey said.“Our kids are doing wonder-fully under the circumstances.Our scores prove that. We’revery proud of the educationthese kids are getting in gradesK-12,” Fey said.“The financial balances willnot get better for either districtin the next few years. If our en-rollment stays the same, costswill go up and teachers willget a small raise. Our teachershave been wonderful at takingvery small raises because theywant to keep the place operat-ing,” Fey said.“We have functioned andfunctioned and functioned – but now it has caught up to us,”Fey said. “The board will haveto look at some other possibili-ties and make some difficultdecisions. Not immediately,but in the years to come.”“We’re going to the stateSchool Budget Review Com-mittee to see if we can get theCorwith-Wesley deficit takencare of, but it is highly unlikelythey (state) will approve that.I’ve talked to the state depart-ment of education and theyhave said, ‘you need to makeimmediate cuts,’ or the SBRCwill not approve your plan,”Fey said. “I’ve told the SBRC‘we cannot make any morecuts, or we won’t be meetingstate teaching standards.’ Wehave to plan ahead as best aswe can for the next few years.”Fey and Rotert say some of the first changes will start withsharing activities for the 2013-14 school year. They havealready talked with neighbor-ing districts about the possi-bility of sharing activities andsome classes, but nothing hasbeen formally presented or ap-proved.“We will be seeking somesharing of activities for nextyear. That’s mostly due to lownumbers of kids,” Fey said.“For example, I think we onlyhave seven junior high boysnext year, and we play eight-man football. Our junior highfootball coach has resigned.We don’t have enough playersand we don’t’ have a coach, sowe are going to look at sharingof some activities.”Rotert reported on districtenrollment. LuVerne’s enroll-ment has increased from 68 to76 students over the past year.“Since the official countdate on Oct. 1, we have losttwo or four students. But theother day we had a new stu-dent come in. I am amazed athow mobile our society is,”Fey said.In action items, the boardapproved on-time funding for modified allowable growth for increasing enrollment.“When your enrollmentgoes up, you can apply for on-time funding. It doesn’t in-crease our budget, but it guar-antees our funding is on-time,”Fey said. “They don’t do it for the LuVernes of the world,they do it for the Waukees of the world, who see an increaseof 500 kids in one year andthey have to go out and hire10-15 teachers to serve thosekids.”“The rule is in place and wewill take advantage of it andmake the application for thatfunding,” Fey said.In personnel matters, theboard accepted the resignationof the middle school footballcoach Paul Garman.The board also accepted abid of $55 per hour from Mc-Peak Excavating to providesnow removal for the upcom-ing winter. The board also ap-proved payment of bills for theend of the month, along reviewof committee meeting minutesinvolving the site visit the stateconducted last winter.“The last step of our sitevisit from last year was our SIAC/CTE committee meet-ings and minutes. James(Rotert) submitted those to thestate department of education.That is the last official step for our site visit,” Fey said.The board’s next regular-meeting is set for Dec. 12.
Future
from front page
fice to be assigned a user nameand password to access the e-edition. There is also an optionto subscribe to the e-edition of the paper only.The Humboldt Reminder pages are also online eachweek free of charge. Sev-eral special sections are alsoavailable to view online at nocharge.The popular monthly mag-azine, Humboldt NOW, is nowavailable online for the lowprice of $1 per month. Printeditions are available at thenewspaper office and at gro-cery stores, convenience storesand banks.“We’ve had so many re-quests for the magazine andthe online edition allows peo-ple from all over the world toaccess Humboldt NOW,” Pub-lisher Jim Gargano said.The humboldtnews.comwebsite is extremely popular with more than 22,000 visitorsper month, a figure that con-tinues to grow. More “Break-ing News” will be put on thewebsite as stories unfold in theHumboldt County area.Viewing and ordering pho-tos has also been made easier.Readers can view the photosthat appear in the Independent,and also the hundreds thatdon’t make it in.“We might take 100 shotsat an event, but maybe only afew get in the paper. Peoplecan browse through the restof them in the Photo Galleriesand if there are some they like,they can order them at veryreasonable prices,” Garganosaid.The humboldtnews websitehas news, sports, obituaries,Cook of the Week, weather and easy to access links impor-tant to the Humboldt Countyarea. Readers simply click onany ad on the page to find outmore information about thatadvertiser.“Humboldtnews.com isthe number one website in theHumboldt County area andthat’s exciting to advertisers.There’s no one else that cov-ers the stories of the Humboldtarea like our excellent staff.We will continue to striveto provide our readers withthe best local news coveragethey’ve come to expect,” Gar-gano said.For more information, con-tact the newspaper office at(515) 332-2514, or email
in-dependent@humboldtnews.com
, or visit www.humboldt-news.com.
Website
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In the Humboldt CountyBoard of Supervisors storythat appeared in the Nov. 8issue, a clarification shouldbe noted regarding the sale of the Humboldt County mainte-nance sheds. Humboldt Coun-ty Engineer Paul Jacobson re-ports that the “and contents,”refers to any fuel oil or liquidpropane that may be in tankssold with the buildings, notools or equipment presentlyin the buildings is includedunless specifically stated inthe legal advertisement for thestructures.
Clari
cation
The Humboldt CountyMinisterial Association’s an-nual Christmas Food BasketDistribution will take placeon Tuesday, Dec. 18, fromthe Humboldt County Fair-grounds.Baskets must be broughtto the fairgrounds between 10a.m. and 6 p.m. on Monday,Dec. 17.Baskets can be picked upby the assigned people at thefairgrounds on Tuesday, Dec.18, between 8:30 a.m. and3:30 p.m. Humboldt-DakotaCity pick up time is 11 a.m. to3:30 p.m. All others are from8:30 to 11 a.m.More than 250 families inHumboldt County enjoy a bet-ter Christmas because of thisevent, which is coordinated bythe Humboldt County UDMOOutreach Office.
ChristmasBasketdistribution
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