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Quicklet on The Best Simon and Garfunkel Songs: Lyrics and Analysis

Quicklet on The Best Simon and Garfunkel Songs: Lyrics and Analysis

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Published by Hyperink
ABOUT THE BOOK

Before they emerged as Simon and Garfunkel, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel performed and recorded as Tom and Jerry, after the cat and mouse duo of animated comedy. The pair met at school in Queens, New York, in 1953 and shared an interest in folk revival music as it entered the popular consciousness. Inspired by the Everly Brothers, who merged country with rock and roll, young Paul and Art endeavored to write songs and arrange vocal harmonies. In 1957, they covered Everly Brothers’ “Hey, Schoolgirl” for Big Records when they were only 15 years old. “Hey, Schoolgirl in the second row / The teacher’s lookin’ over / So I got to whisper way down low,” the song goes. Tom and Jerry reached number 49 on the pop chart with that song.

Another seven years went by before the pair recorded again. When Simon was working for a publisher to sell songs for recording, he introduced some of his own songs for consideration. He and Garfunkel auditioned, and, beyond expectation, Columbia Records offered them a recording deal. In 1964 they released Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK



After the breakup, Simon went on to record 11 studio albums of his own. Garfunkel did pursue an acting career, as well as a poetic career. In 1981 they got together for a reunion concert in New York City’s Central Park. In 2003 and 2004 they took their Old Friends tour (named after a song from the Bookends album) around the country.

In 2004 they recorded a song called “Citizen of the Planet”:

“I am a citizen of the planet.

I was born here.

I’m going to die here,

Come what may.

I am entitled by my birth

To the treasures of the earth.

No one must be denied these,

No one must be denied.

Easy dreams

At the end of a chain-smokin’ day,

Easy dreams at the end of the day.

Who am I to believe

That the future we perceive

Lies in danger and the dangers increase?

Who are we to demand

That the leaders of the land

Hear the voices of reason and peace?”

As in many of their songs written for the 1960s and 1970s, this song is immediately relevant and timeless. As James Taylor explained, “Through it all—whether they were together or not—they’ve remained a force in American music and culture. Their impact has been huge. To use a hackneyed phrase, they scored some of the most meaningful years of our lives” (Rolling Stone).
ABOUT THE BOOK

Before they emerged as Simon and Garfunkel, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel performed and recorded as Tom and Jerry, after the cat and mouse duo of animated comedy. The pair met at school in Queens, New York, in 1953 and shared an interest in folk revival music as it entered the popular consciousness. Inspired by the Everly Brothers, who merged country with rock and roll, young Paul and Art endeavored to write songs and arrange vocal harmonies. In 1957, they covered Everly Brothers’ “Hey, Schoolgirl” for Big Records when they were only 15 years old. “Hey, Schoolgirl in the second row / The teacher’s lookin’ over / So I got to whisper way down low,” the song goes. Tom and Jerry reached number 49 on the pop chart with that song.

Another seven years went by before the pair recorded again. When Simon was working for a publisher to sell songs for recording, he introduced some of his own songs for consideration. He and Garfunkel auditioned, and, beyond expectation, Columbia Records offered them a recording deal. In 1964 they released Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK



After the breakup, Simon went on to record 11 studio albums of his own. Garfunkel did pursue an acting career, as well as a poetic career. In 1981 they got together for a reunion concert in New York City’s Central Park. In 2003 and 2004 they took their Old Friends tour (named after a song from the Bookends album) around the country.

In 2004 they recorded a song called “Citizen of the Planet”:

“I am a citizen of the planet.

I was born here.

I’m going to die here,

Come what may.

I am entitled by my birth

To the treasures of the earth.

No one must be denied these,

No one must be denied.

Easy dreams

At the end of a chain-smokin’ day,

Easy dreams at the end of the day.

Who am I to believe

That the future we perceive

Lies in danger and the dangers increase?

Who are we to demand

That the leaders of the land

Hear the voices of reason and peace?”

As in many of their songs written for the 1960s and 1970s, this song is immediately relevant and timeless. As James Taylor explained, “Through it all—whether they were together or not—they’ve remained a force in American music and culture. Their impact has been huge. To use a hackneyed phrase, they scored some of the most meaningful years of our lives” (Rolling Stone).

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Published by: Hyperink on Nov 14, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved
List Price: $2.99

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