Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
18Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Notes from the Startup Wilderness: Discovery Engines, Big Data Mining, Social Commerce, and Other Trends in Today's Startups

Notes from the Startup Wilderness: Discovery Engines, Big Data Mining, Social Commerce, and Other Trends in Today's Startups

Ratings: (0)|Views: 217 |Likes:
Published by Hyperink
ABOUT THE BOOK

Introduction

Thank you to friends at Hyperink for putting this collection of my writings together. I was a bit startled at just how much content I'd created online. It almost felt like too much :)

The folks at Hyperink read it all, organized it, and created an ebook out of it, and much to my surprise, created a whole that is much greater than the sum of its parts.

I hope you enjoy pieces of it!

Semil Shah

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

The Social Economy

Via Flickr by NASARobonaut. @semil"It seems everything nowadays (information, payments, commerce) is becoming democratized...except for our government, of course. "June 6, 2012 @semil"KP's Chi Hua Chien: "We've done democratization of information, then distribution, then computing. Next is commerce." #tcdisrupt "May 23, 2012

TechCrunch - May 1, 2011

Many years ago, after graduating college, I came home before moving to NYC, wondering how I would scrounge together the money for the first month’s rent and security deposit so my friends and I could all live together in the Big Apple. I had one month to get the cash, and instead of going out for traditional, hourly-wage work, I decided to go through all of my old stuff and throw it on eBay. In those days, I got online through dial-up, would have to mail a hard copy of the pictures to interested buyers, and would ship items to auction winners only when their check arrived by mail and cleared into my bank account. In one month, I got rid of winter jackets, sports equipment, and baseball cards to the tune of $7,000, tax free, enough to buffer the move to NYC.

A few years later, when I moved to San Francisco, it was Craigslist to the rescue, helping with initial sublets, furniture, stereo equipment, and the odd jobs I did to soften the transition. Without knowing it, I was stumbling through life fueled mainly by a peer-to-peer (P2P) network and economy that helped me connect supply and demand, as well as time and money. Instead of using consignment shops or hosting a garage sale, or instead of buying new items in a traditional store, I buffered my moves to NYC and SF primarily fueled by P2P networks.

That was P2P 1.0, anchored by eBay and Craigslist, networks that have connected billions. And, while these companies continue their march, we are already into the next peer-to-peer evolution: P2P 2.0. Unknowingly at the time, I was exposed to the thought a few years ago in graduate school, when my classmate, James Reinhart, came up with the idea for a “Netflix for used clothes,” which has morphed into venture-backed thredUP, a P2P network connecting parents to trade gently-worn baby and kid clothes, goods that are very expensive to buy new. Another success is Lending Club, a peer lending site connecting lenders with borrowers primarily for refinancing credit card debt or small business loans.

Today, P2P 2.0 is in full-swing, and that’s putting things lightly. Y Combinator breakout Airbnb began as an ad-hoc solution for the founders to earn a little extra scratch during a convention when tight hotel supply provided an opportunity to rent out air mattresses in their apartment, with the added touch of breakfast. The result today is a rapidly growing company and brand that aims to connect those who seek space with those who need it – you can rent boats, treehouses, and even castles. Airbnb has been so successful that it has spawned a handful of international copycats and motivated the likes of GetAround, a P2P car-sharing network.

The newest entrant into the P2P space is the concept I’m most excited about: Zaarly. The founder, being taller than average, realized prior to boarding a flight in economy class that he would be willing to pay someone on the same flight to swap for an exit row seat.
ABOUT THE BOOK

Introduction

Thank you to friends at Hyperink for putting this collection of my writings together. I was a bit startled at just how much content I'd created online. It almost felt like too much :)

The folks at Hyperink read it all, organized it, and created an ebook out of it, and much to my surprise, created a whole that is much greater than the sum of its parts.

I hope you enjoy pieces of it!

Semil Shah

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

The Social Economy

Via Flickr by NASARobonaut. @semil"It seems everything nowadays (information, payments, commerce) is becoming democratized...except for our government, of course. "June 6, 2012 @semil"KP's Chi Hua Chien: "We've done democratization of information, then distribution, then computing. Next is commerce." #tcdisrupt "May 23, 2012

TechCrunch - May 1, 2011

Many years ago, after graduating college, I came home before moving to NYC, wondering how I would scrounge together the money for the first month’s rent and security deposit so my friends and I could all live together in the Big Apple. I had one month to get the cash, and instead of going out for traditional, hourly-wage work, I decided to go through all of my old stuff and throw it on eBay. In those days, I got online through dial-up, would have to mail a hard copy of the pictures to interested buyers, and would ship items to auction winners only when their check arrived by mail and cleared into my bank account. In one month, I got rid of winter jackets, sports equipment, and baseball cards to the tune of $7,000, tax free, enough to buffer the move to NYC.

A few years later, when I moved to San Francisco, it was Craigslist to the rescue, helping with initial sublets, furniture, stereo equipment, and the odd jobs I did to soften the transition. Without knowing it, I was stumbling through life fueled mainly by a peer-to-peer (P2P) network and economy that helped me connect supply and demand, as well as time and money. Instead of using consignment shops or hosting a garage sale, or instead of buying new items in a traditional store, I buffered my moves to NYC and SF primarily fueled by P2P networks.

That was P2P 1.0, anchored by eBay and Craigslist, networks that have connected billions. And, while these companies continue their march, we are already into the next peer-to-peer evolution: P2P 2.0. Unknowingly at the time, I was exposed to the thought a few years ago in graduate school, when my classmate, James Reinhart, came up with the idea for a “Netflix for used clothes,” which has morphed into venture-backed thredUP, a P2P network connecting parents to trade gently-worn baby and kid clothes, goods that are very expensive to buy new. Another success is Lending Club, a peer lending site connecting lenders with borrowers primarily for refinancing credit card debt or small business loans.

Today, P2P 2.0 is in full-swing, and that’s putting things lightly. Y Combinator breakout Airbnb began as an ad-hoc solution for the founders to earn a little extra scratch during a convention when tight hotel supply provided an opportunity to rent out air mattresses in their apartment, with the added touch of breakfast. The result today is a rapidly growing company and brand that aims to connect those who seek space with those who need it – you can rent boats, treehouses, and even castles. Airbnb has been so successful that it has spawned a handful of international copycats and motivated the likes of GetAround, a P2P car-sharing network.

The newest entrant into the P2P space is the concept I’m most excited about: Zaarly. The founder, being taller than average, realized prior to boarding a flight in economy class that he would be willing to pay someone on the same flight to swap for an exit row seat.

More info:

Published by: Hyperink on Nov 14, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved
List Price: $4.95

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Full version available to subscribers
See more
See less

04/05/2014

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 4 to 75 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 79 to 95 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 99 to 107 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 111 to 132 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 136 to 160 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (18)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
testkevasthe liked this
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads
atukbaraza liked this
nkfran liked this
nkfran liked this
Harold Escobar liked this
Solik Beneunge liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download