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Social inclusion of young people. Being socially included on the Edge

Social inclusion of young people. Being socially included on the Edge

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Published by Edgeryders
Social inclusion is a fuzzy concept which has been differently defined depending on legal and political contexts in Europe and beyond. Within European institutions such as the European Union and the Council of Europe, the social inclusion of both adult and young people has gained space and importance, due to the demographic challenges of an ageing society, precariousness generated by the economic crisis and the difficult transition for young people to an independent and satisfying adulthood, with respect to previous generations and in spite of their higher levels of education.
This position paper will first focus on the concept of social inclusion emerged in the European institutions and policies and then it will embark on the analysis of what social inclusion emerges to be according to Edgeryders. The critical analysis can help to check whether the understanding of social inclusion emerged in the EU policy does match or not with the Edgeryders’ view on this very concept and on the ways in which it should be pursued in relation to youth in Europe and beyond, according to them.
Social inclusion is a fuzzy concept which has been differently defined depending on legal and political contexts in Europe and beyond. Within European institutions such as the European Union and the Council of Europe, the social inclusion of both adult and young people has gained space and importance, due to the demographic challenges of an ageing society, precariousness generated by the economic crisis and the difficult transition for young people to an independent and satisfying adulthood, with respect to previous generations and in spite of their higher levels of education.
This position paper will first focus on the concept of social inclusion emerged in the European institutions and policies and then it will embark on the analysis of what social inclusion emerges to be according to Edgeryders. The critical analysis can help to check whether the understanding of social inclusion emerged in the EU policy does match or not with the Edgeryders’ view on this very concept and on the ways in which it should be pursued in relation to youth in Europe and beyond, according to them.

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Published by: Edgeryders on Nov 16, 2012
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1
Social inclusion of young people.Being socially included on the Edge?
Barbara Giovanna Bello
1
 
Abstract
Social inclusion is a fuzzy concept which has been differently defined depending on legaland political contexts in Europe and beyond. Within European institutions such as theEuropean Union and the Council of Europe, the social inclusion of both adult and youngpeople has gained space and importance, due to the demographic challenges of anageing society, precariousness generated by the economic crisis and the difficulttransition for young people to an independent and satisfying adulthood, with respect toprevious generations and in spite of their higher levels of education.This position paper will first focus on the concept of social inclusion emerged in theEuropean institutions and policies and then it will embark on the analysis of what socialinclusion emerges to be according to Edgeryders. The critical analysis can help to checkwhether the understanding of social inclusion emerged in the EU policy does match or 
not with the Edgeryders‟ view on this very concept and on the ways in which it should be
 pursued in relation to youth in Europe and beyond, according to them.
1
University of Milano, Italy. Member of PEYR (Pool of European Youth Researchers )
 
2
I. What does Social Inclusion mean for European institutions? Differentapproaches
 
1. Social Inclusion in youth policies in a nutshell.
 
2.
Social Inclusion in European policies: Meanings and interpretations
 
3.
The link between social inclusion, the EU anti-discrimination law and policiesand equal opportunities: targeted approaches vs. broad policy for the socialinclusion of youth.
 
II. What can be inferred on Social Inclusion from the Edgeryders inputs?
4. Edgeryders
 –
who are they, how and what they can contribute?5.
 Are edgeryders socially included‟? Do they st
rive for more social inclusion?6. Social inclusion for ´whom´?
III. Conclusions: What would social inclusion/social cohesion policies look like ifthey were based on Edgeryders data?IV. Bibliography
 
I. What does Social Inclusion mean for Europeaninstitutions? Different approaches
2
 
1. Social inclusion in the youth policies in a nutshell.
The Lisbon Strategy
3
(March 2000) integrated a youth perspective in many fields relatedto young people´s life, such as education, employment, social inclusion and civil society.In this framework, in the making of the insightful White Paper on youth of 2001,
4
itbecame clear 
that young people needed to be “included”, together with researchers and
policy makers, in the drawing of youth-related documents as well as in their evaluation.With this aim, a Europe-wide consultation took place between May 2000 and March2001, which involved hundreds young Europeans, from all backgrounds and countries.
2
The theoretical part of this paper heavily elaborates on the theoretical paragraphs of my Ph.D
dissertation “
Looking at the EU Anti-Discrimination Measures Towards the Roma People through the Glass of Intersectionality: a Comparative Study 
”, defended on 17 January 2012 at the
University ´ Statale´ of Milano
3
See at:http://www.europarl.europa.eu/summits/lis1_en.htm#a[Accessed on 30 June 2012].
4
European Commission White Paper. A New Impetus for European Youth,
 
COM(2001) 681 final,Brussels, 21.11.2001, pp. 76. Available at: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2001:0681:FIN:EN:PDF [Accessed on 30June 2012].
 
3
The proposals concerning the issue of “social inclusion”, coming out from theconsultations, in order to
enhance and reinforce national, regional and local measures as part of the Eur 
opean Social Inclusion Strategy‖,
5
 
are:
―Giving young people access to resources, rights and services:
 
 –
decent and healthy housing; 
 –
appropriate healthcare; 
 –
other public and private services, e.g. in the field of justice, culture, sport and leisure; 
 –
access to these new resources, rights and services geared to the particular needs of young people with social and economic difficulties; 
―second chance‖ opportunities for 
young people who drop out of tailor-made schemes (such as in rehabilitation, vocational training, etc).Developing preventive approaches to address the causes of the social exclusion of young people at a very early stage: 
 –
Focus on individual needs through a more people-centred approach.
 –
Give special attention to the needs of young people at local and regional level in terms of health centres, guidance/counselling, cultural activities,sports, day nurseries, housing,transport, etc., especially for those who are socially excluded or face the risk of social exclusion (such as young single parents).
 –
Improve the social inclusion of ethnic minorities.
 –
Enhance conflict resolution with the help of social workers.
 –
Ensure that policies focusing on working conditions, on social rights and on social welfare are systematically implemented. Reforming the social security systems and social legislation: 
 –
Ensure inter-generational solidarity in pension schemes.
 –
Eliminate discrimination in social welfare systems (e.g. against women, disabled young people, ethnic minorities).
 –
Take into account the needs of young people, especially those who are disadvantaged, in social legislation in areas such as precarious work contracts, flexible working hours, equal payments, accidents at work, access to care facilities for young families.
 –
Provide young people with information on their rights and social protection.At European level: 
5
European Commission,
Ibid 
., p. 44.

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