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Table Of Contents

preface
What Plants Need to Grow
Getting Plants Started
Caring for New Plants
Dealing With Pests
Bean
Beet
Carrot
Chickpea
Jerusalem Artichoke
Lentil
Onion, Garlic, and Shallot
Potato
Radish
Summer Squash
Sweet Potato
Turnip
Almond
Avocado
Carob
Chinese Star Apple
CITRUS
Date
Feijoa
Kiwi
Mango
Papaya
Peanut
Pineapple
Pomegranate
Sapodilla
Anise
Caraway
Celery
Coriander
Dill
Fennel
Fenugreek
Mustard
Sesame
Black Sapote
Chayote
Cherimoya
Genip
Jicama
Malanga
Prickly Pear
Tamarillo
Tomatillo
tropical Guava
Arrowhead
Bitter Melon
Ginger
Jujube
LemonGrass
Litchi
Loquat
Ñame
Persimmon
Sugar Cane
Tamarind
Taro
Water Chestnut
P. 1
Don't Throw It, Grow It!: 68 windowsill plants from kitchen scraps

Don't Throw It, Grow It!: 68 windowsill plants from kitchen scraps

Ratings:

3.78

(9)
|Views: 207 |Likes:
Published by Workman Publishing

Magic and wonder hide in unexpected places — a leftover piece of ginger, a wrinkled potato left too long in its bag, a humdrum kitchen spice rack. In Don't Throw It, Grow It! Deborah Peterson reveals the hidden possibilities in everyday foods.

Peterson, former president of the American Pit Gardening Society, shows how common kitchen staples — pits, nuts, beans, seeds, and tubers — can be coaxed into lush, vibrant houseplants that are as attractive as they are fascinating. With Peterson's help, a sweet potato turns into a blooming vine; chickpeas transform into cheery hanging baskets; the humble beet becomes a dramatic centerpiece; and gingerroot grows into a 3-foot, bamboo-like stalk. In some cases the transformation happens overnight!

Don't Throw It, Grow It! offers growing instructions for 68 plants in four broad categories — vegetables; fruits and nuts; herbs and spices; and more exotic plants from ethnic markets. The book is enhanced with beautiful illustrations, and its at-a-glance format makes it a quick and easy reference. Best of all, every featured plant can be grown in a kitchen, making this handy guide a must-have for avid gardeners and apartment-dwellers alike.

Magic and wonder hide in unexpected places — a leftover piece of ginger, a wrinkled potato left too long in its bag, a humdrum kitchen spice rack. In Don't Throw It, Grow It! Deborah Peterson reveals the hidden possibilities in everyday foods.

Peterson, former president of the American Pit Gardening Society, shows how common kitchen staples — pits, nuts, beans, seeds, and tubers — can be coaxed into lush, vibrant houseplants that are as attractive as they are fascinating. With Peterson's help, a sweet potato turns into a blooming vine; chickpeas transform into cheery hanging baskets; the humble beet becomes a dramatic centerpiece; and gingerroot grows into a 3-foot, bamboo-like stalk. In some cases the transformation happens overnight!

Don't Throw It, Grow It! offers growing instructions for 68 plants in four broad categories — vegetables; fruits and nuts; herbs and spices; and more exotic plants from ethnic markets. The book is enhanced with beautiful illustrations, and its at-a-glance format makes it a quick and easy reference. Best of all, every featured plant can be grown in a kitchen, making this handy guide a must-have for avid gardeners and apartment-dwellers alike.

More info:

Publish date: May 7, 2008
Added to Scribd: Nov 19, 2012
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781612122182
List Price: $10.95

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03/27/2014

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paperloverevolution reviewed this
Rated 3/5
This would be great for indoor gardeners looking for interesting houseplants, and it gives a good introduction to seed-saving. If you have limited space, a limited budget to spend on gardening supplies, and are hoping to eat what you grow, however, this book won't have much to offer you. I found two bits of information really helpful and exciting, and I will here pass them along to you: guavas will fruit indoors, and you can pick the tamarind seeds out of those plastic packages of tamarind pulp and plant them. Sweet!
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Vinson Vaz added this note
This seems like a very interesting book. Will lead you back to the nature.
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