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Huron Hometown News - November 15, 2012

Huron Hometown News - November 15, 2012

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Published by Catawba Security
Huron Hometown News for November 15, 2012
Huron Hometown News for November 15, 2012

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HURON
HOMETOWN NEWS
GREAT PRESS FOR A GREAT LAKE PLACE
November 15, 2012
 
 
NEWS ONLINE 24/7
...
 
 www.HuronHometownNews.com
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AroundTown
Page 2
----------------MileStonesChurchChat
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----------------LibraryParks&Recreation
Page 5
----------------Schools
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Chef-WiIlsRecipe
Page 7 
 
525 Cleveland Rd.
 
uron
  M 
arket 
419
-433-2499
Open 8-4
 Thanksgiving Day 
Over 100 KraftBeers including5 Christmas Ales
BEEF TENDERLOIN
EXPIRES 11-21
$
6.99
 /LB
 
C
ORNELL’S
Foods 
 A Friendly Place to Shop!!
HOURS: 7 AM - 9 PM DAILY 419-433-7733 408 Cleveland Road East, Huron, OH 44839
PRICES GOOD Nov. 15 - Nov. 21, 2012
LocallyOwned&Operated!
MONEY SAVING FACT: 
THE LESS YOU EAT OUT…THE MORE YOU SHOP CORNELL’S THE MORE MONEY YOU’LL HAVE IN YOUR POCKET!! 
Compare Cornell's ad to the rest. More choices,better value! Support your local community
Wine of the Week
C a ro l' s
 
The DreamingTree
750 ML Chardonnary
$13.49
Reg.
$20.49
LIBBY'S PUMPKINLARGE CAN 29 OZ.
$2.50
HARTZLER EGGNOG 32 OZ.CUTE BOTTLE
$4.99
STOVE TOPSTUFFING
 
$1.00
FRESHYAMS.
49¢/LB.
IDAHO POTATOES10 LB. BAG
$2.49!
OUR FAMILYTURKEYS.
78¢/LB.
SPIRAL SLICEDHAM
$1.89/lb
HEINZ GRAVY12 OZ. JAR
$1.00
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You may or may not have already noticed,but 12 members of the Huron Police Depart-ment are doing their best to grow a moustachethis month. These men were inspired whenpart-time ofcer, Bryant Halsey, presented the‘Movember’ idea. According to their web site,“Movember is the global men’s health charity engaging men to grow and women to supportthe Mo (moustache) forthe 30 days of Novem-ber. Through the pow-er of the moustache,awareness and funds areraised for men’s health,specically prostate andtesticular cancer initia-tives.” Unlike many is-sues related to women’shealth, especially breastcancer, men’s health-related issues have notreceived nearly as muchemphasis and funding.According to recentstudies, one man in six will be diagnosed withprostate cancer in hislifetime. About two-thirds of these cases in-volve men over 65 years old. Prostate canceris currently the second leading cause of cancerdeath for men in America. Testicular cancer isnot quite as common, but one in 250 men willdevelop this form of cancer. The majority of men diagnosed with testicular cancer are 15-40 years old.Begun in Melbourne, Australia, in 2003 withparticipation by 30 men, the Movember move-ment has now spread to 21 countries. The or-ganization seeks to encourage men to discusstheir health issues, something that is quite for-eign to most men. According to their web site,“Movember was born from recognition that afun and engaging initiative could help encour-age men to become more actively involved intheir own health. Movember aims to increaseawareness and support for men’s health by getting conversations started at a grassrootslevel, educating menabout the health risksthey face, and raisingvital funds for supportprograms.” The mous-tache is the vehicle usedto bring up these im-portant topics. “MoBros effectively becomewalking, talking bill-boards for men’s healthfor 30 days, raisingfunds along the way.”The members of theHuron Police Depart-ment participating inMovember are workingunder the team name“Huron”. Each partici-pant is accepting dona-tions either for them-selves or for the team.The team has a goal of raising $5,000. If you choose to contribute, you can make a donation to a participant di-rectly or online at Movember.com. (Be sureto choose team name “Huron”, not “Team Hu-ron”.) Alternately, donations can be brought tothe Huron Police Department. All donationsare tax-deductible. During this month, be sureto look out for some interesting moustacheson the faces of our police force. You might justsee a Clark Gable, Mark Twain, Tom Selleck,or even Yosemite Sam amongst Huron’s nest.
Members of the HuronPolice Department GrowMos for ‘Movember’
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The Fire Department dive team is in theprocess of being outtted with new, up-dated equipment. Due to our past equip-ment being outdated and in constantneed of repair the purchase has become anecessity. The current dive team equip-ment was purchased 13 years ago and wasmaintained annually and also after every dive. Even with the proactive upkeep it hasdeteriorated and become a safety hazard.The new equipment will allow us to work more efciently and safely with the otherarea dive teams. The Sandusky Fire De-partment purchased similar equipment towhat we will be getting within the past few  years. Having similar equipment increasesour interoperability. Do to the conditionof our equipment, recently we have had todeny request from Sandusky Fire Depart-ment for mutual aid.The new dive gear will include new dry suits, full face mask, and an updated un-derwater communications system. A dry suit is a two part system. On the outsidewe wear a water proof, non-permeable, tri-laminate material. The outer suits allow usto work in hazardous conditions and limitour exposure to them. Under the dry suitwe wear wool pants and jackets for warmth.The old dry suits were made of galvanizedrubber where the new suits are more lightweight and will allow for more exibil-ity and maneuverability while performingtasks under the water. The dry suits willalso be more visible with reective striping.The material also meets new standards onpersonnel protection from hazards foundin and around the water.The new dive masks are full face and willoffer us better underwater visibility thenwhat we had previously. The new mask willalso allow us to better communicate witheach other while under water performingtasks and with the team members on thesurface. To go along with the new maskswe are getting an updated communicationsystem. Our old communication systemwas not always reliable. Most of the watersin this area which the dive team is neededoffer very poor visibility. There are many times when you are unable to even see yourhand in front of your face. When visibil-ity is limited, constant and reliable com-munications is very important. The new communication system will be hard-wiredfrom the surface to our mask under the wa-ter with a state of the art communicationsrope. There will be a team member on thesurface who will monitor all of our underwater communications and also keep thedivers advised of any changes on the sur-face. In any dive rescue or recovery there isalways at least two divers in the water at alltimes. For this reason we have purchasedtwo 200 foot communications ropes. Thenew masks will also allow us to have a wire-less system in place. The wireless system al-lows for more divers to communicate witheach other and the surface.The new dive gear brings our dive teamback up to the standards that we expect of ourselves as a Fire Department. With thisnew gear we will once again be able to ef-fectively and efciently provide aid to thecitizens and visitors of Huron, Lake Erie,and our surrounding communities.
RevitalizedDive Team
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Many exciting projects are underway aroundHuron. Though these projects do not alwaysproceed as expected, sometimes you haveto make a bigger mess before things get bet-ter. Such is the case with the ConAgra silos,the road construction on the Cleveland RoadBridge and on Main Street, and the pier. In theend, all of this means that things are progress-ing around Huron.Great changes are apparent at the pier due tothe ongoing Huron Pier/Lighthouse Improve-ment Project. Several weeks ago, City employ-ees completed the widening of North MainStreet up to the entrance to the pier. The stonethat was used for this aspect of the project wastaken from the ConAgra demolition site. Mostrecently, Buckeye Tree and Crane Service com-pleted the initial removal of foliage and treegrowth along the pier. Before the next phaseof construction begins, the City needed to re-vise its 25-year lease agreement with the Army Corps of Engineers. With this agreement, theCity will be permitted to proceed with thefollowing aspects of the pier project, most of which will be completed in July: 1. ConcreteCap and Installation of Observation Deck onthe Block House, 2. Installation of GalvanizeRailing, 3. Installation of ADA Ramps alongpier and accessing Observation Deck, 4. Addi-tional Tree Clearing north of the block house;5. Vegetation Control along west side of pier,and 6. Asphalt Cap over stone base section andwidening of access point.The Huron Pier/Lighthouse ImprovementProject is estimated to cost $97,000. Fundingfor this project was taken from Economic De-velopment Fund 277. According to City Man-ager, Andy White, “The Finance Committeerecommended the Council sequester one timerevenues generated from a large estate tax de-posit solely for the use of ‘projects supportingcommunity, economic or capital infrastruc-ture improvement.’” Further, White explainedthat over the next few years, the City will con-sider completing additional work on the pierand lighthouse including “a landscaping planto replace some of the cleared vegetation andgrass planting to allow for greater recreationalaccess into the Contained Disposal Facility (CDF); installation of utilities, including light-ing; pedestrian access paths inside the CDF; awalkway along the entire perimeter of the CDFand exploration of a joint governance partner-ship for annual maintenance.”In the end, the pier and lighthouse area of Huron will not only be more aesthetically pleasing, but it will be more accessible also.Overall, Huron’s city leaders are working to-ward goals to enhance the quality of life forand economic benets to Huron residents.This truly is an exciting time for Huron!
Progress Around Town- The Pier
 
2www.HuronHometownNews.com
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|Thursday,November15,2012
Editor & Publisher 
JOHNSCHAFFNE
General Manager/Editor 
CONNIEROBERTSconnie@huronhometownnews.com
 Account Executive
CONNIEROBERTSconnie@huronhometownnews.com
Sports Editor 
CHRISMISCHLERcmischler@huronhometownnews.com
Graphic Design
SCOTTHORNMARKSCHAFFNE
Classifeds
connie@huronhometownnews.com
Business Manager 
ROBINQUESADA
Contributing Editorial 
MARYSTRAYEJUDGEWILLIAMSTEUKHURONPARKS&RECREATIONHURONPUBLICLIBRARY
LetterstotheEditor,ourreaders’opinionforum,newsreleasesandyourcommentsastotheoperationofTheHuronHometownNewsarewelcome.Pleasenote:Allletterstotheeditor,intendedforpublication,
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isownedandoperatedbyHuronPress,LLC.Nopartofthispublicationmaybereproducedortransmittedinanyformwithouttheexpressed,writtenconsentofthePublisher.Theviewsexpressedbythecontributorsarenotnecessarilythoseofthemanagementof
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Huron Hometown News® SM TM 1992103 Wall Street • Huron, Ohio 44839 Phone 419-433-1401 • Fax 419-73
4-5382
www.huronhometownnews.com Published every Thursday 
For adults and children needing prompt treatment for minor illnesses or injuries, Firelands Physician Group Urgent Care provides prompt diagnosis and treatment. Most major insurances accepted (Urgent Care co-pay is charged).No appointment necessary.Monday – Friday: 1 pm –9 pmSaturday & Sunday: 11am – 5 pm
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Minor lacerations
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 Work-related injuries
 X-ray, lab, and drugtesting available on site
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TheOhioStateUniversityAlumniClubofErieCoun-tyisseekingapplicantsforseveralscholarshipstobeawardedforthe2013-2014academicyear.Eligiblecan-didatesmustbecurrentlyenrolledatOhioState,mustbeErieCountyresidents,musthavecompleted30credithoursbytheendofSpringSemester2013,andmusthaveaminimumGPAof3.2.Requestsforapplicationsshouldbesentto:Mr.JerrySemon,ScholarshipChair,1219ClevelandRd.W.,Hu-ron,Ohio44839orviae-mailatjerrysemon@buckeye-express.com.Deadlineforsubmittingcompletedappli-cationsisFeb.2,2013.
Ohio StateUniversityAlumni Club
HuronCitySchoolsispleasedtoan-nouncetheadditionofMr.MatthewSaffordtotheMusicDepartmentthis year.Saffordbringswithhimtalent,experienceandenthusiasm.Asafor-merDrumCorpsInternationalWorldClassnalistmarchingwiththeCan-tonBluecoatsandhavingreceivedna-tionalhonorsasafoundingmemberoftheSometimesFive,BGSUbarber-shopquartet,Saffordhasbeenshar-inghisknowledgeandtalentwiththe youngmusicalmindsofjuniorandseniorhighschoolstudentsforoveradecade.PriortocomingtoHuronCitySchools,SaffordwastheAssistantDi-rectoroftheBandsatEastwoodLocalSchoolDistrictinPemberville,Ohiosince2002.Whilethereheworkedwithstudentsfrom6thgradethroughHighSchoolasheassistedwithcon-ducting,directingandaccompanyingallthedifferentBandPrograms,theEnsemblesandtheChoirs.Safford,theInstrumentalMusicTeacherforgrades5-12,isexcitedtobeapartoftheHuronSchoolDis-trict.“MygoalforHuronistohelpcontributetothetraditionofqualitymusicianshipandhelpthestudentsbecomequalityindependentmusi-cians,”statedSafford.“Huronhasaqualityprogramalreadyinplace;Mrs.ScherleyandIhavediscussedthemu-tualdesiretogrowtheHighSchoolprograminnumberswhilemaintain-ingthequality.”Safford’sfullbandexperienceisen-ablinghimtoassistalloftheHuronstudentswiththeirvariedmusicalin-terests.
Huron Music Department Adds Harmony
HeiscalledDr.Billbypatientsandstaffalike.HeisSeniorMedicalDi-rectoratSteinHospice,aU.S.ArmyVeteran,apulmonologist,retiredprofessor,husbandandtwinsonofapreacher.Nowthe81-year-oldphy-siciancanaddanothertitle:pioneer.Dr.WilliamIngliswasnamed“PersonoftheYear”bytheMidwestCareAllianceonNov.1attheiran-nualconference.Alongwithbeingcalledapioneerintheeldofhospicemedicine,hewascitedas“
amen-torandinspirationtomanyofthehospicemedicaldirectorsinthestateofOhio.ThousandsofdyingpatientsandtheirfamilieshavebeentouchedbyDr.Inglis’care.Heishumble,unassumingandalwaysputsthepatientrst.”Dr.Inglishasspent35yearsworkingwithhospicepatients,rstasavolunteerphysicianattheHospiceofColumbus,thenmedicaldirectorfortheHospiceatRiverside&Grant.WhentheAmericanBoardofHospiceandPalliativeMedicinebeganacer-ticationprograminthemid-1990s,hewasoneofthersttoearnthecredential.HejoinedSteinHospicein2004,whenheandhiswifeSu-zannemovedtoMarblehead.Andhecamepreparedfortheweather–hepurchaseda(yel-low)Jeepsohe’dbeabletoreachpatientseveninthesnow.He’sstilldrivingit.Dr.Inglisisamemberofsev-eralethicscommittees,includingtheNationalHospice&PalliativeCareOrganizationandFirelandsRegionalMedicalCenter.HeisworkingwithMidwestCareAl-liancetochangeOhiolawsoasimplerDoNotResuscitateformislegallybinding.Andwhenhesnotbusysee-ingpatientsoradvocatingend-of-lifeissues,Dr.Inglisisavail-abletohelpwithStein’sVeteranServicesprogram.HeconductspinningsforVeteransandassistswiththeescortceremonyper-formedatthecarecenterwhenaVeterandies.“OneofthereasonsIamsoproudtobewithSteinisbecauseoftheVeteranservices.IalsoamimpressedwithStein’scomple-mentaryservices,suchasPawsUp,Reiki,SacredArtofLivingandDying,ThresholdChoirandGuidedImagery.ThequalityanddedicationofthepeoplewhoworkatSteinHospicemakeitaprivilegetoworkhere,”hesaid.
Dr. William Inglis named ‘Person of the Year’
BowlingGreenStateUniversityFirelandsCollegewillhostitsannualWomeninScience,Technology,Engi-neering,andMathconferencedesignedforjuniorhighschoolgirls.100femalestudentsin7thand8thgradeswillpartici-pateintheconferenceatBGSUFirelandswhichintro-ducesgirlstothetraditionallymale-dominatedeldsofscience,technology,engineering,andmathematics.Studentswillengageinavarietyofexperimentsandcreativeproblemsolvingastheyparticipateinmultiplehands-on,STEMworkshops.Theywillalsodiscoverexcitingcareeropportunitiesinafunandeducationalatmosphereastheyinteractwithprofessionalwomenintherespectiveelds.SponsoredbytheOfceforEducationalOutreach,theprogramisscheduledforNov.16from8:45a.m.to1:50p.m.atBGSUFirelands.
BGSU Firelandsto Host Women inSTEM Conference
FirelandsRegionalMedicalCenterwasrecentlyaward-eda$1.36millionPrimaryandBehavioralHealthCareIn-tegrationgrantbytheSubstanceAbuseandMentalHealthServicesAdministration.Thisfour-yeargrantwillsupporttheprovisionofprimarycareservicestouninsuredindi-vidualswithseverementalillnessinErie,Huron,Lorain,Ottawa,Seneca,Sandusky,andWyandotcounties.Fire-landswasoneof30granteesnationwideandoneofsevengrantsawardedinOhio.FirelandsCounselingandRecoveryServiceswillserveasthepatient’shealthhometofacilitateaccesstoarangeofmedicalservices,behavioralhealthcare,andcommunitybasedsocialservices.Thismodelofcarewillemphasizethewholepersonandwillincludecaremanagement,andcoordinationbetweenallmembersofthepatient’shealth-careteamwhoseprimarygoalistoimprovethepatient’soverallhealthstatusandqualityoflife.“FirelandsCounseling&RecoveryServicesisfundedinpartbyfourMentalHealth&RecoveryServicesBoardsin-cludingtheMentalHealthandRecoveryServicesBoardofErie&OttawaCounties;theMentalHealthandRecoveryServicesBoardofSeneca,Sandusky&WyandotCounties;theAlcohol,DrugAddictions&MentalHealthServicesBoardofHuronCounty;andtheMentalHealth&Re-coveryServicesBoardofLorainCounty,”sharesMarshaMruk,VicePresident,FirelandsCounselingandRecoveryServices,FirelandsRegionalMedicalCenter.“Thisfund-ingprovidesmentalhealthandalcoholanddrugservicestoallpersonsregardlessofabilitytopay.Inlightofshrink-inggovernmentfundingfornewprograms,thePrimaryandBehavioralHealthCareIntegrationgrantwillhelpusintegratemuchneededprimarycareservicestopersonswhocannotaffordbasichealthcareservices.”ThePrimaryandBehavioralHealthCareIntegra-tionprogramwasestablishedbytheU.S.DepartmentofHealthandHumanServicestolookatthewholepersonbyprovidingprimarymedicalcaretouninsuredpersonswithlong-termmentalhealthproblems.Thegoaloftheprogramistoimprovethephysicalhealthofadultswithseriousmentalillnessesthatareat-riskforco-occurringmedicalconditionsanddebilitatingchronicdiseases.Oneofthereasonsforthisinitiativeisthatpersonswithlong-termmentalillnessesfacealifeexpectancythatis25yearsshorterthanthegeneralpublicintheUnitedStates.Thegrantalsohasastrongfocusonpreventionandwellnessprograms.TheSubstanceAbuseandMentalHealthServicesAdmin-istrationisresponsibleformanagingthisprogramwhichhasthetripleaimofimprovingthehealthofindividualswithseverementalillnessthroughaccurateevaluationandtreatment;helpingtomanageboththementalhealthandphysicalhealthneedsoftheseindividualsthroughquick-eraccesstoservices;andprovidinghighqualityserviceswhilereducingthecostofoverallcare.FirelandsCounseling&RecoveryServicesisanestab-lishedproviderofinpatientandoutpatientbehavioralhealthservices.Offeringafullspectrumofmentalhealthandchemicaldependencyservices,FirelandsCounsel-ing&RecoveryServiceshasofcesconvenientlylocatedthroughoutErie,Huron,Lorain,Ottawa,Sandusky,Sen-eca,andWyandotCounties.Staytunedformoreinfor-mationonthisexcitingnewprogramorcall419-557-5114withquestions.
Firelands Receives Grant for Primaryand Behavioral Health Care Integration
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SB193 targetS Scrap metal tHeFtS
TheStateofOhioiscrackingdownonscrapmetalthefts.OnSeptember28,2012,SenateBill193wasenactedtoaddressthisproblem.Thisbillcre-atesamandatoryonlineregistryforscrapmetalandbulkmerchandisecontainerdealersinOhio.Stateof-cialshopethatthiswillhelpdeterscraptheftsbyfocusingontheendpoint,whichincludesthedealerandrecyclingfacilities.Therearealsocriminalpenaltiesforpurchasing,selling,orreceivingcer-tainitems.By2014,dealersarerequiredtoreporttransac-tionsthroughanelectronicreportingsystemmaintainedbytheOhioDepartmentofPublicSafety.TheOhioDe-partmentofPublicSafetywillalsomaintaina“donotbuyfrom”listofthoseknowntobescrapthievesinthearea.IfyouwouldlikemoreinformationinregardstoSenateBill193,pleasevisittheGeneralAssemblywebsiteatwww.legislature.state.oh.us.Articlesappearinginthiscolumnareintendedtoprovidebroad,generalinformationaboutthelaw.Beforeapplyingthisinformationtoaspeciclegalproblem,readersareurgedtoseekadvicefromanattorney.
FROM THE BENCH
 
Christ Episcopal Church
120 Ohio Street, Huron419-433-470110 a.m. worship and communionservicesSunday School 9 a.m. and AdultSunday School 9 a.m.www.christchurchhuron.com
First Presbyterian Church
225 Williams St. HuronWorship Hours:8:30 & 10:45 a.m.Sunday School at 9:30 a.m.Fellowship Hour at 11:45 a.m.Email: churchofce@huronpresby www.rstpresbychurchhuron.org
Grace Presbyterian Church
Kalahari Resort, Nia ConventionCenter, Rt. 250, Huron419-271-1112graceopchurch@gmail.comwww.graceop.orgWorship: Sunday 6 p.m.
Holy Trinity Anglican Church
1608 St. Rt. 113, Milan419-499-3683Father Dennis HenkleWorship and Holy Communion –Sunday 10:00 a.m.
Huron United Methodist Church
Open Doors, Open Minds, Open Hearts
338 Williams Street, Huron419-433-3984Rev. J. Roger Skelly – Watts8 am - Sunday Casual Service/Praise Band9 am - Sunday School for All Ages10 am - Celebration Worship/PipeOrgan and Choir
Pastor’s Cherub Chat atboth services.
6:30 pm - Jr. and Sr. High YouthFellowship
Sanctuary and classroomshandicapped accessible.
Lighthouse Assembly of GodChurch
820 Cleveland Road East, Huron419-433-8889www.lighthouseagc.orgSunday Service 10:45 a.m.Sunday School 10:00 a.m. adultand childrenAdult Bible Study 6:30 p.m. onTuesdaysYouth Group 6 p.m. Sunday Food Pantry 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.Wednesdays; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.ThursdaysFood Pantry: 419-616-0088Salvation Army Service Unit 10:30a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursdays by appointment only.Salvation Army Services: 419-433-0500
St. Matthew Lutheran Church
15617 Mason Road, VermillionRev. Dr. Karl Fry, Pastor440-967-9886www.lutheransonline.com/stmattverml-cmsSunday School and Bible Study 9:30a.m. All Ages WelcomeSunday Worship Service - 10:30 amAll WelcomeWednesday 7:00 p.m. Worship
St. Peter Catholic Church
430 Main Street, Huron, 419-433-5725www.stpetershuron.orgMass Schedule5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. Sunday 10:30 a.m. Sunday Weekday & Holyday MassesPlease see the bulletin on ourwebsiteReconciliation 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.Saturday or by appointment
The Chapel
4444 Galloway Road, Sandusky 419-627-0208www.thechapel.tv/Saturday Service 5:00 p.m.Sunday Services at 9:00 a.m. &11:00 a.m.Jr. High Youth Group – Sundaysduring 9 and 11 am church servicemeet in the Warehouse/YouthRoomSr. High Youth Group – Sunday evenings from 6 to 8pm meet in theWarehouse/Youth Room.
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints
4511 Galloway Road, Huron419-626-9860Bishop: Bill ReedSacrament Service Sundays 9:30a.m.Family History Center Wednesday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and from 5 p.m.to 9 p.m.
Zion Lutheran Church
930 Main Street, Huron419-433-4711www.zionhuron.org8:30 a.m. Sundays TraditionalWorship Service10 a.m. family-friendly contemporary worship, withSunday School for children andteens.
uron 
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Church Chat 
OBITUARY
 Milestones
Come Join us for our 14th
Annual Christmas Open House
Fri. Nov. 16th, 10-6 Sat. Nov. 17th, 10-6 Sun. Nov. 18th, 10-5
Be sure to stop in for snacks, in house specials & free gift with minimum purchase.
Fantastic selection of new Ferguson marbles, blown glass and original oil paintings.
Old World Ornaments, antiques and holiday accessories.
Chamilia spend $100 or more & receive a free “Just what I wanted” bead.
Like us on Facebook and enter you name to win a free glass blowing session.
“Wave of Joy”
Cary Ferguson’s 2012Completely hand blown ornamenthand-signed, dated & numbered
FERGUSON GALLERY.COM 5890 E. Harbor Rd. Marblehead Facebook.com/Ferguson Gallery
Free Layaway... Free Gift Wrap... We ship worldwide 419-734-0600
GALLERY & STUDIO
 
Discount Flooring & Design
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 9-5 Daily • 9-4 Sat • 12-3 Sun
CALL MATT FOR FREE IN-HOME MEASURE 419-271-5916
Located at 214 E. Perkins Ave (Perkins Plaza)
 
Thanksgiving Special!
 
74 OZ. FRIEZE CARPET WITH 1/2 INCH PADAND COMPLETELY INSTALLED. NORMALLY4.59 SQ. FT. ON SALE $2.59 SQ. FT.
Call for details!
It’s Your Journey, LLC
Metaphysical Supplies & Services
Stones & Crystals • Intention Candles Jewelry & Incense • Wiccan Supplies • BooksCD’s • Massage • Reiki • Intuitive Readings
4750 Cleveland Road E. • Suite 1 • Huron, OH 44839
419-433-0888
Hours: Wed - Fri 12-6 PM Sat 10 AM - 6 PM
 www.itsyourjourney.com
XMitiwangaAngryBull
Michael A. Tuohey
Mar 27, 1947 - Nov 7, 2012
Michael A. Tuohey, 65, of Huron, diedWednesday, Nov. 7, 2012, in ClevelandClinic. Mike was born March 27, 1947, inSandusky, and was a lifelong resident of theHuron area. He graduated from St. Mary Central Catholic High School in 1966. Hebegan working at Western & Southern In-surance Company, Sandusky, in 1971, thenworked for Firelands Insurance Agency,Berlin Heights, and then purchased Cara-bin Insurance Agency in Norwalk in 1993.He was a U.S. Air Force veteran and servedin the Vietnam War from 1966-70. He wasa member of St. Peter Catholic Church,Huron; a former member of Huron LionsClub; Huron Eagles; Sandusky AMVETSand Sandusky American Legion. He be-longed to various insurance associationsincluding the PIAA. He is survived by hiswife, Linda (Miller); two daughters, SusanStutzman and Stephanie Tuohey, of Hu-ron; two grandsons, Nicholas and JordanStutzman; and a sister, Kathleen (John)Dobyns, of Sandusky. He was preceded indeath by his parents, Clarence and Helyn(Wintersteller) Tuohey. A funeral masswas held on Monday, Nov 12th, at St. Pe-ter Catholic Church, 430 Main St., Huron.The Rev. Jeffery Sikorskil ofciated. Burialis in Scott Cemetery, Huron, with Military Rites. Contributions may be made to St.Mary Central Catholic, Sandusky, or to thedonor’s favorite charity.
Donald Jacob Slyker
Feb 3, 1925 - Nov 6, 2012
Donald Jacob Slyker, 87, of Huron, passedpeacefully on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, with fam-ily and close friends by his side in Erie County Care.He was born Feb. 3, 1925, in Sandusky.Don lived in the Milan area moving to Huronin 1977. He attended Milan High School. Donworked at Lavey Pottery & Tile in Milan andlater retired from Westvaco in 1981.He en- joyed camping, shing and working on carsbut mostly being with family and friends.Donis survived by nieces and nephews, Mike (Jody)Slyker of Streetsboro, Ohio, MaryAnn (Rog-er) Darr, of Clyde, Chris Slyker, of Norwalk,Melanie Stevens, of Sandusky, Susie Baker, of Huron, Jason and Derek Eppler, of Huron,Justine Slyker, of Sandusky, Mason Bowen,of Norwalk, Alisha Slyker, of Sandusky, Zack and Scottie Baker, of Huron, Cathy Slyker, of Sandusky, Mark (Karen) Mason, of Cincinnati,Gloria (William) Pooch, of Castalia, Donna(Dave) Mason, of Norwalk, Cindy (Robert)Re, of Hattiesburg, Miss., S arah (Jared) OpferMadison and Makenna Kovalaske, of Casta-lia, Jason Taylor (Amy) Brayden, William andEmilie, of Norwalk, Shaun Taylor, of Norwalk,Dayna, Dylan, Katie and Payton Taylor and Mi-chelle Taylor, all of Norwalk, Cindy Johnston,of Norwalk, Will (Jess) Mason and Angela Ma-son, of Tennessee, Rebekah (Alex) Mason andIsla, of Cincinnati, Brandi (Kris) Re and Keelieand Courtney Re, of Hattiesburg.Don waspreceded in death by his parents, George andGlennwyn Slyker, brothers, Richard and GlennSlyker and nephew, Matthew Pooch. A memo-rial service was held on Friday November 9 atFoster Funeral Home & Crematory, 410 MainSt., Huron. Deacon Mark Mason will ofciate.Burial will be in Scott Cemetery, Huron.Contributions may be made to the ErieCounty Care Facility Activities Dept., 3916 E.Perkins Ave., Huron, OH 44839, or to SteinHospice Services, 1200 Sycamore Line, San-dusky, OH 44870.
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