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Published by Samuel Gezahegn

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Published by: Samuel Gezahegn on Nov 20, 2012
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8
Geometrical properties
of
cross-sections
8.1
Introduction
The strength of a component of a structure is dependent on the geometrical properties
of
its cross-section in addition to its material and other properties. For example, a beam with a large cross-section will, in general, be able to resist a bending moment more readily than a beam with a smallercross-section. Typical cross-section
of
structural members are shown in Figure 8.1.(a) Rectangle
@)
Circle (c)
‘I’
beam
(d)
‘Tee’ beam (e) Angie
bar
Figure
8.1
Some typical cross-sections
of
structural components.
The
cross-section of Figure 8.l(c) is also called a
rolled steeljoist
(RSJ);
it is used extensivelyin structural engineering. It is quite common to make cross-sections of metai structural membersinthe formofthe cross-sections ofFigure 8.l(c) to (e), as suchcross-sectionsare structurallymoreefficient
in
bending than cross-sections such as Figures 8.l(a) and (b). Wooden beams are usuallyof rectangular cross-section and not of the forms shown in Figures 8.l(c) to (e). This is becausewooden beams have grain and will have lines of weakness along their grain if constructed as inFigures 8.l(c) to (e).
8.2
Centroid
The position of the centroid
of
a cross-section is the centre of the moment of area of the cross-section. If the cross-section is constructed from a homogeneous material, its centroid will lie at thesame position as its centre of gravity.
 
Centroidal axes 20
1
Figure8.2
Cross-section.
Let
G
denote the position of the centroid of the plane lamina of Figure
8.2.
At the centroid themoment
of
area
is
zero, so that the following equations apply
Zx
dA =ZydA
=
0
(8.1)
where
dA
=
elemental area of the lamina
x
=
horizontal distance of
dA
from
G
y
=
vertical distance
of
dA
from
G
8.3
Centroidal
axes
These are the axes that pass through the centroid.
8.4
Second moment
of
area
(I)
The second moments
of
area of the !amina about the
x
-
x
and
y
-
y
axes, respectively, are givenby
1,
=
C
y2
dA
=
second moment of area about
x
-
x
Zw
=
C
x2
dA
=
second moment of area about
y
-
y
(8.2)
(8.3)Now from Pythagoras’ heorem
x2+y2
=
?
:
Ex
d~
+
Cy2
d~
=
Cr2
d~
or
Zp+Zn
=
J
(8.4)
 
202
Geometrical properties
of
cross-sectionsFigure
8.3
Cross-section.
where
J
=
polar second moment of area
=Cr2
d~
(8.5)
Equation
(8.4)
is
known
as theperpendicular axes theorem which states that the sum of the secondmoments of area
of
two
mutually perpendicular axes of a lamina is equal to the polar secondmoment of area about a point where these
two
axes cross.
8.5
Parallel
axes
theorem
Consider the lamina of Figure
8.4,
where the
x-x
axis passes through its centroid. Suppose that
I,
is known and that
I
is required, where the
X-X
axis lies parallel to the
x-x
axis and at aperpendicular distance
h
from it.
Figure
8.4
Parallel axes.

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