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Industry Insights: More Than Two Dozen Studies Demonstrate CAM Cost-effectiveness … plus more

Industry Insights: More Than Two Dozen Studies Demonstrate CAM Cost-effectiveness … plus more

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Systematic Review Finds Cost-effectiveness in Complementary and Integrative Medicine in Over Two Dozen Studies
A critically needed review of all cost-effectiveness studies on complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) found 28 “high-quality studies,” according to lead author Patricia Herman, MS, ND, PhD. The review was global and covered the years 2000 to 2010. Herman, an economist and licensed naturopathic doctor, first engaged the project in 2008 with David Eisenberg, MD, of the Harvard School of Public Health. The report is entitled “Are Complementary Therapies and Integrative Care Cost-effective? A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations.” 1 In an interview in the Huffington Post, Herman states: “I’m tired of this talk that there is no evidence for cost-effectiveness of complementary and integrative medicine. There is evidence. We need to move on to phase two and look at how transferable these findings are. We can take this evidence and run.”2
Studies that found frank “cost savings” ranged from acupuncture for breech delivery and for low back pain, to manual manipulation for neck pain, natural products for various conditions, and a study of the whole practice of naturopathic medicine for chronic low back pain. Those found to be cost-effective based on analysis of changes in quality adjusted life years included treatment in clinics of Oregon chiropractors, plus others related to massage, tai chi, Alexander technique, and numerous studies of adjunctive acupuncture treatment.

Systematic Review Finds Cost-effectiveness in Complementary and Integrative Medicine in Over Two Dozen Studies
A critically needed review of all cost-effectiveness studies on complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) found 28 “high-quality studies,” according to lead author Patricia Herman, MS, ND, PhD. The review was global and covered the years 2000 to 2010. Herman, an economist and licensed naturopathic doctor, first engaged the project in 2008 with David Eisenberg, MD, of the Harvard School of Public Health. The report is entitled “Are Complementary Therapies and Integrative Care Cost-effective? A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluations.” 1 In an interview in the Huffington Post, Herman states: “I’m tired of this talk that there is no evidence for cost-effectiveness of complementary and integrative medicine. There is evidence. We need to move on to phase two and look at how transferable these findings are. We can take this evidence and run.”2
Studies that found frank “cost savings” ranged from acupuncture for breech delivery and for low back pain, to manual manipulation for neck pain, natural products for various conditions, and a study of the whole practice of naturopathic medicine for chronic low back pain. Those found to be cost-effective based on analysis of changes in quality adjusted life years included treatment in clinics of Oregon chiropractors, plus others related to massage, tai chi, Alexander technique, and numerous studies of adjunctive acupuncture treatment.

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Published by: InnoVision Health Media on Nov 20, 2012
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