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Local Policies for "Immigrant-Friendly" Cities

Local Policies for "Immigrant-Friendly" Cities

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How to make your city immigrant friendly. good starting point in an important civic conversation.
How to make your city immigrant friendly. good starting point in an important civic conversation.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Richard Herman, Cleveland Immigration Lawyer on Nov 21, 2012
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01/26/2014

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Cities andImmigration
Local Policies for Immigrant-Friendly Cities
C O
W
S
 
Cities and Immigration
 
Local Policies for Immigrant-Friendly Cities
 January 2008; updated April 2008
 Authors
Pablo A. Mitnik  Jessica Halpern-FinnertyMatt Vidal
 About COWS
The Center on Wisconsin Strategy (COWS) is a nonprot, nonpartisan“think-and-do tank” dedicated to improving economic perormance andliving standards in the state o Wisconsin and nationally. Based at theUniversity o Wisconsin-Madison, COWS works to promote “high road”strategies that support living wages, environmental sustainability, strongcommunities, and public accountability.
 Acknowledgements
Many policy experts and immigrant and labor advocates were interviewedor this report; they shared with us inormation and ideas, and helpedus in many other ways. They are Pablo Alvarado (National Day LaborersOrganizing Network); Jonathan Blazer (National Immigration Law Center);Muzaar Chishti (Migration Policy Institute, NYU School o Law); MichaelEttlinger (Economic Policy Institute); Janice Fine (Rutgers University);Maricela Garcia (National Alliance o Latino American and CaribbeanCommunities); Taryn Higashi (Ford Foundation); Bernie Horn (Center orPolicy Alternatives); Kenneth Jacobs (UC Berkeley Labor Center); Kayse Jama (Western States Center); Neal Kwatra (UNITE HERE); MelindaLewis (El Centro); Tim McFeeley (Center or Policy Alternatives); TylerMoran (National Immigration Law Center); Rajesh Nayak (Brennan Centeror Justice, NYU School o Law); Nathan Newman (Progressive StatesNetwork); Margarita Rubalcava (Four Freedoms Fund); Amy Sugimori(National Employment Law Project); Cathi Tactaquin (National Network orImmigrant and Reugee Rights); Fred Tsao (Illinois Coalition or Immigrantand Reugee Rights).We also would like to thank Paul Sonn (Brennan Center or Justice, NYUSchool o Law) or his expert advice on many legal issues, and DarinDalmat (SEIU), James Elmendor (Los Angeles Alliance or a New Economy),Andy Kahn (Davis, Cowell & Bowe), Jennier Lin (East Bay Alliance ora Sustainable Economy), Richard McCracken (McCracken, Stemerman& Holsberry), Sheldon Shugarman (Baltimore Wage Commission), GregSimons (Coalition or Humane Immigrant Rights o Los Angeles), andDavid Ostendor (Center or New Community) or their inormation andcomments. Jessa Lewis Valentine provided research assistance.
 
 
Table of Contents
1. Introduction .................................1
1.1 A new socio-demographic reality ..........................21.2 Federal, state, and local reactions .........................51.3 Reasons for immigrant-friendly policies at the local level ........71.4 A menu of local policies for immigrant-friendly cities ...........9
2. The Enforcement of Immigration Law’s CivilProvisions ..................................10
2.1 Background .........................................102.2 Policies ............................................13
2.2.1 Non-participation in the enorcement o civilimmigration law .....................................142.2.2 Not collecting inormation on immigration statusunless required by law ................................142.2.3 Establishing broad privacy or condentialityprotections .........................................152.2.4 Position-taking resolutions against proposed ederallegislation, and or comprehensive immigration reorm .........15
3. Employment and Self Employment ...............16
3.1 Background .........................................163.2 Policies ............................................17
3.2.1 Using a city’s regulatory power to establish wagefoors and other employment standards ....................173.2.2 Using a city’s proprietary interests as a basis orpublic policy ........................................223.2.3 Helping enorce ederal and state employmentregulations .........................................263.2.4 Regulating domestic-employee placing agencies ..............283.2.5 Implementing EOE policies and disseminatinginormation on good jobs ..............................293.2.6 Curbing employers’ misuse o no-match letters ..............303.2.7 Curbing employers’ misuse o the Basic PilotProgram/E-Veriy .....................................313.2.8 Supporting worker centers or day laborers .................333.2.9 Combating independent contractor misclassication ...........343.2.10 Supporting minority entrepreneurs and street vendors .........35

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