Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania

Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities in Romania

Ratings: (0)|Views: 27 |Likes:
Published by Nicolas Marion
Zionist Central committee in Galati Romania second to the one in Basel,

The Beginning of the Jewish Settlement and its Development
The name Galati was first mentioned in Romanian documents from the 15th century. The first Jews settled there towards the end of the 16th century. Tombstones from the years 1590-1595 were found in the old cemetery. A second cemetery was established in 1629.
In the middle of the 17th century there was already a large Jewish settlement in Galati. The Jews were living in a quarter named 'The City Valley', but had to abandon it in 1770. They settled in a new quarter and developed it. The traders among them lived in the 'Jewish Road' and the craftsmen lived in separate roads according to their crafts: 'The Furriers Road', 'The Shoemakers Road', etc.
Zionist Central committee in Galati Romania second to the one in Basel,

The Beginning of the Jewish Settlement and its Development
The name Galati was first mentioned in Romanian documents from the 15th century. The first Jews settled there towards the end of the 16th century. Tombstones from the years 1590-1595 were found in the old cemetery. A second cemetery was established in 1629.
In the middle of the 17th century there was already a large Jewish settlement in Galati. The Jews were living in a quarter named 'The City Valley', but had to abandon it in 1770. They settled in a new quarter and developed it. The traders among them lived in the 'Jewish Road' and the craftsmen lived in separate roads according to their crafts: 'The Furriers Road', 'The Shoemakers Road', etc.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Nicolas Marion on Nov 22, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/25/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Galati - Encyclopedia of JewishCommunities in Romania, Volume 1(Romania)
45°27' / 28°03'Translation from
Published byYad VashemPublished in Jerusalem, 1969
 
AcknowledgmentsProject CoordinatorRobert S. Sherins, M.D. 
Our sincere appreciation toYad Vashem for permission to put this material on the JewishGen web site.
This is a translation from:
 Pinkas Hakehillot:
Encyclopedia of Jewish Communities, Romania,Volume 1, pages 90-99, published by Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, 1969http://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/pinkas_romania/rom1_00090.html
This material is made available by JewishGen, Inc. and the Yizkor Book Project for the purpose of  fulfilling our mission of disseminating information about the Holocaust and destroyed Jewishcommunities.This material may not be copied, sold or bartered without JewishGen, Inc.'s permission. Rights may bereserved by the copyright holder.
 
 JewishGen, Inc. makes no representations regarding the accuracy of the translation. The reader may wishto refer to the original material for verification. JewishGen is not responsible for inaccuracies or omissions in the original work and cannot rewrite or edit the text to correct inaccuracies and/or omissions.
 
Our mission is to produce a translation of the original work and we cannot verify the accuracy o statements or alter facts cited.(pages 90-99)
 
Galati, Romania
(Yiddish - Galatz)By Theodore Lavi, Ph.D., Coordinator of Pinkas ha-Kehilot in Yad Vashem/Transnistria, HargatEnglish translation researched and edited byRobert S. Sherins, M.D.Translated byZiva Yavin, Ph.D.Translation donated by Robert S. Sherins, M.D., Richard J. Sherins, M.D., and Beryle SolomonBuchmanGalati
A port city by the Danube, Moldova region, Covurlui district, near the estuary of the rivers Siret and Prut, both running through the Carpati woods. The largest port along the Danube and the most important one for wood exports. The city was also famous in exporting grains and was a center for import for the wood, ironand fishery industries.In the 13
th
century the city's name was
Haliciut-Mic
and belonged to the Barlad Princedom.
YearNumber% of JewsinGeneralPopulation
180372 (tax payers) 1841about6,000-7,000 189013,06622.1189913,99221.3191012,000192411,46116.0
 
193019,91220.0194113,51114.1194212,946194713,000
Until the End of WWI
The Beginning of the Jewish Settlement and its Development
The name Galati was first mentioned in Romanian documents from the 15
th
century. The first Jews settledthere towards the end of the 16
th
century. Tombstones from the years 1590-1595 were found in the oldcemetery. A second cemetery was established in 1629.In the middle of the 17
th
century there was already a large Jewish settlement in Galati. The Jews wereliving in a quarter named 'The City Valley', but had to abandon it in 1770. They settled in a new quarter and developed it. The traders among them lived in the 'Jewish Road' and the craftsmen lived in separateroads according to their crafts: 'The Furriers Road', 'The Shoemakers Road', etc.In 1744, a new cemetery was established instead of the previous one that was ruined.In the 18
th
century Galati was the most important port in Moldova. It inhabited many Greeks andBulgarians who were also traders and the competition between them and the Jews became anti-Semitic innature. In 1797, a Romanian pastor gave shelter to 70 Jews and saved them from Greek rioters.In the beginning of the 18
th
century, during the Turk reign, Galati came down in the world and regained itsgrandeur again right after the signing of the Adrianopole Pact (1829) and following its declaration as a“free port” (1834).
The Organization of the Congregation
Until the beginning of the 18
th
century, the main roles were in the hands of the burial society. In 1812, thecongregation got organized and protocols were written of its committee meetings. The meat tax was alsotransferred to this committee. However all this encountered many hardships, inside and outside. Manyassociations established their own synagogues causing disunity. Each synagogue aspired to be on its own, brought its Rabbi and collected meat tax. Since the congregation's budget was built almost solely on themeat tax, each new synagogue diminished this budget. The entities that were behind those newsynagogues were not always religious ones but professional societies. The first synagogue was built in1780 and also a ritual bathhouse. In 1826 the tailors became organized in a guild of their own, with 150members, and established a synagogue. In 1846 the Chabad Hassids founded a synagogue and in 1847 – the orthodox Jews. In 1848 two synagogues – “Ohel” and “Edelstein” were founded. In 1860, the cartersestablished a synagogue. In 1863 an advanced synagogue was founded with a choir and an organ. In 1892the craftsmen founded their own synagogue, built by their charity society (organized in 1875 andnumbered 180 members).

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->