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Crop Wild Relative, Issue 8 April 2012: Novel characterization of crop wild relative, landrace resources as a basis for proved crop breeding.pdf

Crop Wild Relative, Issue 8 April 2012: Novel characterization of crop wild relative, landrace resources as a basis for proved crop breeding.pdf

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Published by Greg John Peterson

Crop Wild Relative

Issue 8, April 2012

Novel characterization of crop wild relative and landrace resources as a basis for improved crop breeding

ISSN 1742-3694 (Online)

www.pgrsecure.org

Crop wild relative

Issue 8 April 2012

Novel characterization of crop wild relative, landrace resources: Conserving plant genetic resources for use now and in the future

The first issue to be published in the context of PGR Secure, a Collaborative Project funded
under the EU Seventh Framework Programme.

The PGR Secure project full title is "Novel characterization of crop wild relative and landrace resources as a basis for proved crop breeding."

The PGR Secure project focuses on ensuring that the genetic diversity inherent in crop wild relative (CWR) and landrace (LR) populations and which is important for crop improvement ― particularly to adapt crops to grow in our changing climate ― is conserved and available for use by plant breeders.

The emphasis lies with the end user:

How can useful traits for crop improvement be identified in CWR and LR?

The University of Birmingham (UK) edits and publishes Crop wild relative on behalf of PGR Secure

Crop Wild Relative

Issue 8, April 2012

Novel characterization of crop wild relative and landrace resources as a basis for improved crop breeding

ISSN 1742-3694 (Online)

www.pgrsecure.org

Crop wild relative

Issue 8 April 2012

Novel characterization of crop wild relative, landrace resources: Conserving plant genetic resources for use now and in the future

The first issue to be published in the context of PGR Secure, a Collaborative Project funded
under the EU Seventh Framework Programme.

The PGR Secure project full title is "Novel characterization of crop wild relative and landrace resources as a basis for proved crop breeding."

The PGR Secure project focuses on ensuring that the genetic diversity inherent in crop wild relative (CWR) and landrace (LR) populations and which is important for crop improvement ― particularly to adapt crops to grow in our changing climate ― is conserved and available for use by plant breeders.

The emphasis lies with the end user:

How can useful traits for crop improvement be identified in CWR and LR?

The University of Birmingham (UK) edits and publishes Crop wild relative on behalf of PGR Secure

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Greg John Peterson on Nov 23, 2012
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Novel characterization of crop wild relative and landraceresources as a basis for improved crop breeding
ISSN 1742-3694 (Online)
www.pgrsecure.org
Crop wild relative
Issue 8 April 2012
    P    G    R    S   e   c   u   r   e  –    E    U    S   e   v   e   n    t    h    F   r   a   m   e   w   o   r    k    P   r   o   g   r   a   m   m   e ,    T    H    E    M    E    K    B    B    E .    2    0    1    0 .    1 .    1  -    0    3 ,    G    A    2    6    6    3    9    4
Conserving plant genetic resourcesfor use now and in the future
 
Editorial............................................................................................................................................................
 
3PGR Secure: enhanced use of traits from crop wild relatives and landraces to helpadapt crops to climate change
 
N. Maxted and S. Kell 
........................................................................................................................................4CWR horizon scanning: what are we doing and what should we be doing?
N. Maxted and S. Kell 
........................................................................................................................................8PGR Secure: Engaging the user community
C. Kik, G. Poulsen, G. Neuhaus and L. Frese
.................................................................................................10A phenomics and genomics approach to the use of landraces and crop wildrelatives for crop improvement
B. Vosman
.......................................................................................................................................................
 
11Looking for resistance to phloem feeders in
Brassica oleracea
K. Pelgrom, G. Sharma, C. Broekgaarden, R. Voorrips, N. Bas, J. Pritchard, B. Ford-Lloyd and B. Vosman
................................................................................................................................................
 
12Applying FIGS to crop wild relatives and landraces in Europe
I. Thormann
.....................................................................................................................................................
 
14The Palanga workshop: European PGRFA experts convene to develop nationalstrategy protocols for CWR and landrace diversity conservation
S. Kell and N. Maxted 
......................................................................................................................................17Prioritization of crop wild relatives in Spain
M.L. Rubio Teso, M.E. Torres, M. Parra-Quijano and J.M. Iriondo
..................................................................
 
18Floristic and vegetation databases as tools for CWR surveys: a case study from Central Italy
F. Landucci, L. Panella, D. Gigante, D. Donnini, R. Venanzoni, R. Torricelli and V. Negri 
...............................
 
22UK wild species to underpin global food security: species selection, genetic reservesand targeted collection
H. Fielder, J. Hopkins, C. Smith, S. Kell, B. Ford-Lloyd and N. Maxted 
..........................................................
 
24Pieces of the puzzle—Trait Information Portal
S. Dias
.............................................................................................................................................................
 
28Where and how? Genetic reserve site selection and development of commonquality standards
J.M. Iriondo, M. Parra-Quijano, C. Lara-Romero, F. Carreño, N. Maxted, S. Kell and B.V. Ford-Lloyd 
..........
 
31Development of a report and monitoring system for the
in situ 
conservation of geneticresources of crop wild relatives in Brandenburg, Germany
R. Vögel 
..........................................................................................................................................................
 
33Collecting genetic resources of crop wild relatives in Crimea, Ukraine, in 2009
 
 A. Diederichsen, R.V. Rozhkov, V.V. Korzhenevsky and R.L. Boguslavsky 
....................................................
 
34Papua New Guinea: a much neglected hotspot of crop wild relative diversity
 
R. Kambuou, T. Okpul and D. Hunter 
..............................................................................................................
 
39Recent publications......................................................................................................................................
 
43
Lathyrus belinensis
: a CWR discovered and almost lost
 
N. Maxted 
.........................................................................................................................................................
 
44
2
Crop wild relative
 
Issue 8 April 2012
 
Editors
:Shelagh KellNigel Maxted
Assistant editor 
:Hannah Fielder 
Design and layout
:Shelagh KellHannah Fielder 
Front cover 
:
Brassica villosa
subsp.
bivo-niana
pictured with clip cagecontaining whiteflies in fieldtrials for plant host resis-tance, Wageningen
Photo
:Koen Pelgrom, WageningenUR Plant Breeding, TheNetherlands
Correspondence address
:Shelagh Kell, School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UKEmail:s.kell@bham.ac.uk
Copyright
© University of Birmingham 2012. All rights reserved. The University of Birmingham edits andpublishes
Crop wild relative
on behalf of PGR Secure, a collaborative project funded under the EU SeventhFramework Programme, THEME KBBE.2010.1.1-03, Grant Agreement no. 266394
Crop wild relative
Issue 8 April 2012
 
e are pleased to welcomeyou to Issue 8 of 
Crop wild relative
the first issue tobe published in the context of PGRSecure, a Collabor ative Project fund-ed under the EU Seventh Framework Programme. The PGRSecure project (full title:
Novel characterization of crop wild relative and landrace resources as a basis for improved cropbreeding 
) focuses on ensuring that the genetic diversity inher-ent in crop wild relative (CWR) and landrace (LR) populationsand which is important for crop improvement
particularly toadapt crops to grow in our changing climate
is conservedand available for use by plant breeders. The emphasis lies withthe end user; how can useful traits for crop improvement beidentified in CWR and LR? How can material containing desir-able traits be made available to the end user? How can weconserve CWR and LR both
in situ
and
ex situ
to ensure thatmaterial is maintained in the long term and is accessible for use in plant breeding programmes? It is fundamental that thelink be made between CWR and LR conservation and use tounderpin global food security
a key element of this project isthat it bridges the ‘gap’between the conservationand plant breeding com-munities.Since the last issue of 
Crop wild relative
waspublished, there havebeen a number of major steps forward in the con-servation of EuropeanCWR. In 2009, work be-gan on the assessment of nearly 600 priority Euro-pean CWR species aspart of the joint EC/IUCN-funded initiative to pro-duce the first European Red List (http://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/conservation/species/redlist/
 
). The
European Red List of Vascular Plants
(http://ec.europa.eu/environment/nature/conservation/species/redlist/downloads/European_vascular_plants.pdf ) was published in November 2011 and identified thatat least 16 % of the CWR species assessed at European levelfor which sufficient data were available are threatened or arelikely to become threatened in the near future and that manymore are threatened at national level (see page 43). The inclu-sion of a significant number of CWR species in the EuropeanRed List, as well as the publication of assessments of 188species endemic to Europe in the IUCN Red List of Threat-ened Species (www.iucnredlist.org/) is a major step forward inCWR conservation and will we hope go a long way towardsraising the profile of CWR amongst the nature conservationcommunity.In September 2010, the joint AEGRO/ECPGR symposium
Towards the establishment of genetic reserves for crop wild relatives and landraces in Europe
(www3.uma.pt/cem/aegro.ecpgr.symp/index.html) was held at the University of Madeira inFunchal, during which the results of the EC-funded AEGROproject (http://aegro.jki.bund.de/aegro/) were disseminated andinvited speakers presented their work in the field of CWR andLR conservation. The symposium provided an opportunity toconvene the first meeting of theECPGR
In Situ
and On-farm Conser-vation Network and to carry out a ‘ho-rizon scanning’ exercise which setboth short and long term priorities for CWR and LR conservation in Europe (see page 8). The pro-ceedings of the symposium, including the results of the horizonscanning exercise and additional contributions were publishedby CABI this year under the title,
 Agrobiodiversity Conserva-tion: Securing the Diversity of Crop Wild Relatives and Lan-draces
(see page 43).The PGR Secure project started on March 1st 2011 and sig-nificant progress has been made in the first year. You can gainan insight into the overall objectives and work programme onpage 4 and in subsequent articles read more detailed informa-tion aboutthe activities of the project, including: the identifica-tion of plant breeders’ needs and barriers to the use of CWRand LR in plant breeding (page 10); characterization of CWRand LR using phenomics and genomics approaches (pages 11and 12); predictive characterization using the Focused Identifi-cation of GermplasmStrategy (FIGS) approach(page 14); development of CWR conservation strate-gies in Spain, Italy and theUK (pages 18, 22 and 24respectively); and the de-velopment of an informa-tion system which willimprove and facilitate ac-cess to conserved CWRand LR resources for usein crop improvement pro-grammes (page 28).A major highlight of thefirst year was the stagingof the joint PGR Secure/ECPGR workshop,
Conservationstrategies for European crop wild relative and landrace diver-sity 
(www.pgrsecure.org/palanga_workshop) in Palanga,Lithuania, the goal of which was to discuss and agree a strate-gic approach to European and national CWR and LR conser-vation (see page 17). Ongoing support to assist national PGRprogrammes to develop national CWR and LR inventories andconservation strategies is being provided by the PGR Securehelpdesk (www.pgrsecure.org/helpdesk).
Crop wild relative
is not restricted to reporting research withinthe context of PGR Secure; we aim to incorporate news andresearch whether it be from within Europe or elsewhere. In thisissue, research is presented from other projects, highlightingthe necessity for both
in situ
(pages 31 and 33) and
ex situ
(page 34) conservation of CWR. The penultimate article givesan insight into the challenges facing CWR conservation inPapua New Guinea (page 39)
challenges which most cer-tainly are not restricted to this country alone. The newsletter concludes with a case study of the Critically Endangered spe-cies
Lathyrus belinensis
(page 44)
.
We hope you find this issue informative and stimulating and welook forward to receiving your contributions for Issue 9 of 
Cropwild relative
which is due to be published in spring 2013.
!
3
Crop wild relative Issue 8 April 2012
 
Participants in the workshop, ‘Conservation strategies for European crop wildrelative and landrace diversity’, Palanga, Lithuania, 7
9 September 2011 (Photo:Pavol Hauptvogel)
W

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