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2012 55K Progress Report Final Large.pdf

2012 55K Progress Report Final Large.pdf

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12/04/2012

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1
 
2012 Progress Report
 As new programs gear upand the latest data come in,the challenges are clear.
by 
2020
we
 
will
 
add
40,000
bachelor’s degrees
15,000
associate degrees
 
2
Louisville was at a crossroads
W
hen 55,000 Degrees was born two years ago, its mission was clear: to dramatically increase the percentage o college-educated Louisville residents by the year 2020.Te name o this new public-private partnership – 55,000 Degrees – reects the boldgoal set by a community roundtable o education, business and civic leaders convenedby the mayor:
If Louisville added 15,000 associate degrees and40,000 bachelor’s degrees, half of working-age adultswould hold a college diploma — up from a third in 2008.
Tat would be a game-changing accomplishment or Louisville’s economiccompetitiveness. And college degrees would open new doors or individuals and amilies:
Education transforms lives.
Making the case for college
The link between education and prosperity hasnever been stronger.
The job advantage
5.8 million jobs lost
 for workers with a high-school education or less
2.2 million jobs gained
 for those with bachelor’s degrees
U.S. jobs in ve years since December 2007 recession
More education, less unemployment
High-school diploma:
 
8.7 percent unemployed
Associate degree or some college:
 
6.5 percent
Bachelor’s degree
:
4.1 percent
Lifetime pay
Bachelor’s degree:
$2.4 million
High-school diploma:
$1.4 million“We must educateourselves to abetter economy”
Arne Duncan,
 
U.S. Secretary of Education
 
2x
8.7%6.5%4.1%
LIFETIME2007 2012
Higher earnings
Workers with a bachelor’s degree or better earn nearly
twice as much
 
today
 
as those with just a high-school diploma.
See notes on back page for data sources throughout the report
 
3
T
HIS PROGRESS REPORT REPRESENTS AN IMPORTANT MILESTONE FOR 55,000 DEGREES
 
as we join orces to dramatically increase the number o college graduates in our city.
FOR THE FIRST TIME, WE HAVE INFORMATION THAT REFLECTS THE EARLIEST POTENTIAL IMPACT OFTHIS TWO-YEAR-OLD INITIATIVE.NUMBERS TELL PART OF THE STORY — AND THEY ARE MIXED.
Our total number o working-age adults with associate degrees or higher
SLIPPEDSLIGHTLY 
rom its gradual upward climb o the previous decade, dropping by almost4,000 rom 2010 to 2011. It’s a slight percentage decline – 40.1 to 38.9 – but
CLEARLY IN THE WRONG DIRECTION.
Te drop reects a loss o almost 9,000 bachelor’s degrees at the same time ourpopulation grew and associate and graduate degrees increased.
 
THE BIGGEST DROP OCCURRED AMONG 25- TO 34-YEAR-OLDS
with bachelor’s degrees – a loss o talent at an age when people put down roots. One possible explanation: Telatest Greater Louisville Project study ound Louisville has lagged substantially behindcompetitor cities in providing well-paying jobs.
At the same time, our regional college and university 
DEGREECOMPLETIONS ARE UP OR HOLDING STEADY.
 
MORE JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS ARE BETTERPREPARED
or college and careers – a 10 percent increase by one measure.
And
MORE WORKING-AGE ADULTS ARE IN COLLEGE
 
 — 
 
A STRONG 24PERCENT INCREASE IN ENROLLMENT
in just two years. Tis is a key indicator because our 96,000 local working-age residents with “somecollege but no degree” are critical to reaching our goal.
Finally, when it comes to nancing college, this report clearly putsin ocus issues related to aordability. Students ace an intimidating landscape o costs and unding options and need help navigating choices.
THE GOOD NEWS IS THAT NET COSTS TO STUDENTS ARE LEVELINGAND ARE ACTUALLY DOWN AT SOME POST-SECONDARY INSTITUTIONS.WE WILL CONTINUE TO DIG DEEPER, STUDY DATA, ASK QUESTIONS ANDIMPROVE ON OUR EARLY EFFORTS
, recognizing that this is a time o dramatic change in the world o post-secondary education. Growth o online classes and a rapidly-shiting job market will require lielong learning. Combined withincreased nancial pressures on post-secondary institutions – including cuts in public unding – we may see a rapid evolution in new ways to prepare or and complete higher education.
IF NUMBERS REFLECT TRENDS, PEOPLE TELL THE REST OF THE STORY.
Hundreds o institutions, organizations and individuals across Louisville have rallied towardthis goal this year and said “Count Me In!” to help our community achieve 55,000 Degrees.Tis all the Gheens Foundation and 55,000 Degrees announced a $20,000 award or the mostinnovative ideas to increase the number o post-secondary degrees.
WE’VE MADE A GOOD START. BUT THIS REPORT UNDERSCORES THE URGENCY OF OUR MISSION.
It will take all o us working together to reach our goal. We are proud to lead the charge.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Chairman Gregory E. Fischer,
Mayor, Louisville Metro Government
Ms. Susan A. Barry,
President and CEO, The Community Foundation of Louisville
Ms. Joan Coleman,
Community Volunteer 
Dr. Kevin W. Cosby,
President, Simmons College of Kentucky 
Mr. David A. Jones, Jr.
Chairman and Managing Director,Chrysalis Ventures
Dr. Donna M. Hargens,
Superintendent, Jefferson County PublicSchools
Mr. Audwin Helton,
President, Spatial Data Integrations, Inc.
Ms. Alice Houston,
President and CEO, Houston-Johnson,Inc.
Mr. William M. Lear,
Chair of the Board, Stoll Keenon Ogden,PLLC 
Ms. Tori Murden McClure,
President, Spalding University 
Dr. Joseph J. McGowan,
President, Bellarmine University 
Dr. Anthony Newberry,
President, Jefferson Community andTechnical College
Dr. Sandra R. Patterson-Randles,
Chancellor, Indiana University Southeast
Ms. Eileen Pickett,
Executive Vice President, Greater Louisville Inc.
Dr. James Ramsey,
President, University of Louisville
Mr. Benjamin K. Richmond,
President and CEO, Louisville UrbanLeague
Ms. Mason B. Rummel,
President, James Graham BrownFoundation
Ms. Leisa Schulz,
Superintendent of Schools, Archdioceseof Louisville
Dr. Rita Hudson Shourds,
Chancellor, Ivy Tech Community College,Southern Indiana
Mr. Victor A. Staferi,
Chairman, CEO and President, LG&E andKU Energy LLC 
Mr. Glenn Sullivan,
President, The Sullivan University System
Mr. Joseph Tolan,
President and CEO, Metro United Way 
Mr. James C. Worthington,
Worthington Law Firm, PLLC 
STAFF
Ms. Mary Gwen Wheeler,
Executive Director 
Dr. Lilly Massa-McKinley,
Collaboration Coordinator 
Mr. Ko Darku,
Research and Information Coordinator 
Mr. Michael Kennedy,
Technology Coordinator 
Mayor Greg Fischer
Chairman of the Board 
Mary Gwen Wheeler
Executive Director 

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