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11.28.12

11.28.12

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Wednesday, November 28, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 62
 
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        •
Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................6
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .......................8Puzzles ......................7Classifieds ................7
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63º/34º
Thursday 64º/45º
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SPORTS
PAGE 8Check out the CW’s latest onlineexclusives at cw.ua.edu
CW ONLINE
By Ashley Tripp
Staff Reporter
It’s been more than amonth since Assistant Deanof Students Lowell Davisannounced the terminationof pledgeship activities toInterfraternity Council presi-dents.“All investigations have beencompleted and appropriateaction has been taken,” TimHebson, dean of students, said.“No chapters are still suspend-ed. All greek organizations canrecruit new members in thespring.”Since that day on Oct. 18,pledges have shed their pledgegear and have blended in withthe active fraternity mem-bers across campus. For thoseoutside the fraternities, thechange in dress has left it diffi-cult to tell if this year’s pledgeshave been initiated.Jacob Adrian, former presi-dent of the Sigma Pi fraternity,said his new members have notyet been initiated.“They were made neophytesimmediately following the can-cellation of pledgeship, whichmeans they basically hold allthe rights of members, buthave not yet been initiated,”he said. “They will be initiatedas soon as we receive theirgrades, assuming they are sat-isfactory.”This process was a deci-sion Sigma Pi’s ExecutiveCommittee and Nationalsreached together and made inan effort to maintain its scho-lastic standards, Adrian said.“Our new members have con-tinued to integrate themselvesinto the fraternity, and whilethis process may be occurringsomewhat slower than normal,it has given them the oppor-tunity to further acclimatethemselves to our organizationafter the pledge period was cutshort,” he said.Adrian said he doesn’t fore-see the future of Sigma Pi beinggreatly affected by the adminis-tration’s decision.“We were fortunate enoughto have a quality group of young men that were commit-ted to learning about what ourorganization has to offer, andgrowing as individuals despitethe premature end of theirpledge period,” Adrian said.“Rush is a constantly evolvingprocess, and regardless of thissituation we will continue toseek out quality individuals toadd to our organization.”Alex Worley, a senior major-ing in marketing and secre-tary of the Alpha Tau Omegafraternity, said ATO’s mostrecent pledges have been neo-phyted until their first semes-ter grades are final because itsbylaws require that any newmember hold a 2.6 GPA to gainmembership.
Pledgeship’s end affects each fraternity differently
Result, reactions varyfrom house to house
By Lauren Carlton
Contributing Writer
The University of Alabama’sSchool of Music is kicking off the holiday season this week-end with Hilaritas, an annualholiday concert put on by theUniversity Singers under thedirection of John Ratledgeand the Alabama JazzEnsemble under the directionof Christopher Kozak.Hilaritas is a Greek wordthat translates loosely to “live joyfully and be who you are.”It has been a Tuscaloosa holi-day staple ever since its firstperformance in 1969. Now, 43years later, Hilaritas is a sen-timental and cherished holi-day tradition for its long-timeloyal audiences.“They’re always enthusias-tic,” said Ratledge, directorof Singers as well as choralactivities at the University.“Some people have beencoming to Hilaritas for 30 plusyears. It’s a big part of theirholiday traditions.”The music of Hilaritas is amix of classical and contem-porary with lots of popularholiday songs. Singers andthe Jazz Ensemble presentpieces individually as well astogether. Ratledge and Kozak,the director of jazz studiesat the University, split con-ducting duties throughoutthe concert.
Decades later, Hilaritas still 1 of Tuscaloosa’s holiday traditions
CULTURE
| SCHOOL OF MUSIC
SPORTS
| BASKETBALL
NEWS
| GREEK LIFE
Current, classic songsto be featured Friday
SEE
HILARITAS
PAGE 2
Submitted
Performers dress up for annual Hilaritas concert.
NEWS
| PLEDGESHIP
6-0: Tide topples Lamar
Greek ExcellenceBanquet honorschapters, members
By Madison Roberts
Staff Reporter
The University of AlabamaOffice of Greek Affairs recog-nized greek chapters and theirmembers for achievementsin academics, service, leader-ship and involvement at the2012 Greek Excellence AwardsBanquet on Nov. 27.Kat Gillan, the director of Greek Affairs, said that in orderto receive an award, the nomineemust apply, and then a commit-tee of three or four staff mem-bers rate the applications andchoose a winner. Award winnersincluded chapters and membersin all three sections of the greekcommunity – the InterfraternityCouncil, the Alabama PanhellenicSociety and the National Pan-Hellenic Association.
Witt, Hebson awardleaders in community
SEE
GREEK EXCELLENCE
PAGE 2SEE
PLEDGESHIP 
PAGE 2
By Marquavius Burnett 
Sports Editor
Rodney Cooper scored 17 points,grabbed eight rebounds and dishedout three assists off the bench tolead Alabama men’s basketball teamto a 75-47 victory over Lamar (1-6) onTuesday.Cooper bounced back after miss-ing the last game with shouldertendinitis to carry the Tide, whowere without leading scorer TrevorReleford (flu-like symptoms) andtheir lone senior Andrew Steele(groin injury).“His perimeter shot wasn’t falling,but he was really active,” head coachAnthony Grant said of Cooper’s play.“He did a great job of getting to theoffensive glass, was really activein the press and made some greateffort plays. He impacted the gamein a lot of ways and it’s certainlygreat to have him back on the floor.”Freshman guard Retin Obasohanstarted in Releford’s place, scoringa career-high 13 points and gettingthree steals while sophomore guardLevi Randolph had 10 points, fiverebounds and three assists.The game was close at halftimewith Alabama leading 36-27. But itall changed at the 17:23 mark in thesecond half when Lamar head coachPat Knight, son of legendary coachBob Knight, was ejected after receiv-ing his second technical for arguingwith the officials.
CW | Austin Bigoney
 Alpha Chi Omega President Susan Speaker accepts the Robert E. Witt Cup on behalf of her sorority.
Ejection of head coachleads to Bama victory
CW | Jingyu Wan
Retin Obasohan shoots from outside the paint, an area in which the Tide struggledin its last season.
SEE
BASKETBALL
PAGE 2
 
Getting ready for 
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
 
LUNCH
Country Fried ChickenHamburgersChili Con CarneDeep Fried OkraCranberry & Orange SaladSteamed Green BeansAsian Coleslaw (Vegetarian)
FRESH FOOD
LUNCH
Roasted Pork LoinGrilled Chicken HerbSandwichSeafood SaladPolenta with Broccoli RabeMashed Red PotatoesTurnip Greens (Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Chicken Breast ParmesanSpaghettiBroccoli & CauliflowerSweet Tomato SoupGrilled Eggplant PizzaPastaNachos (Vegetarian)
ON THE MENU
LAKESIDETHURSDAY 
 What:
Trivia Night
 Where:
Wilhagans
 When:
8 p.m.
 What:
CLC Movie Night:“City of God”
 Where:
241 B.B. Comer Hall
 When:
6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
 What:
Percussion Ensemble
 Where:
Moody MusicBuilding
 When:
7:30 p.m.
TODAY 
 What:
Honors CollegeAssembly Diverse Dessert
 Where:
205 Gorgas Library
 When:
9 p.m.
 What:
Spanish Movie Night:‘Valentin’
 Where:
377 Lloyd Hall
 When:
6:30 p.m.
 What:
Ribbon Cutting andGrand Reopening
 Where:
Schlotzsky’s on 15thStreet
 When:
3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
FRIDAY 
 What:
Hilaritas
 Where:
Moody MusicBuilding
 When:
7:30 p.m.
 What:
12 Days of Wellness
 Where:
Russell Hall Lobby
 When:
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
 What: “
Where are you,Christmas?”
 Where:
Bama Theatre
 When:
5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
GO
GO
Page 2• Wednesday,November 28, 2012
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
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FOLLOW US ONTWITTER@THECRIMSONWHITE VISIT US ONLINE ATCW.UA.EDU
 
LUNCH
SteakBroccoli Cheddar SpudGreen BeansFresh Tomato Basil PenneBroccoli & Cheddar StrataSautéed Mushroom(Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Pork with CaramelizedOnion GravyChicken BurritoDeep Fried OkraRoasted Corn & Potato SoupGarden Burger Taco(Vegetarian)
BURKE
In order to keep the programfresh, pieces are rotated inand out every year. For sing-ers, that means this year willfeature two new arrangementsof “Jingle Bells” and “WhiteChristmas.”The opening and finalemedleys were arranged by anAlabama Jazz Hall of Fameinductee Steve Sample duringhis time at the University.The Jazz Ensemble iscomprised of jazz band andorchestra members. JohnnyMok, a sophomore majoringin cello performance, is anorchestra member who willplay with the Jazz Ensemble inhis second Hilaritas this week-end.“My favorite part of Hilaritasis really the joy of being ableto play Christmas music,” Moksaid.In addition to musical per-formances, the audience willget to see a holiday spectacleonstage. Singers split intoindividual quartets and picka holiday theme to decoratetheir platform and themselves.Themes in the past haveincluded a Griswold familyChristmas, the other reindeer,Alvin and the Chipmunks, aHarry Potter Christmas andmore.Instrumentalists also dressup in costumes and line theirmusic stands with lights andgarland. Mok said his cello sec-tion is thinking about a sum-mer elf theme this year.The performers take thedecorations just as seriouslyas the music; some membersstart brainstorming as early asSeptember.“Some people are so secre-tive about it,” said KatieAldrup, a senior majoring invocal performance and a mem-ber of University Singers.Aldrup will be performingin her final Hilaritas this year.She said seeing everyone’s cos-tumes and creativity along inaddition to singing with theJazz Band has been the bestpart of her Hilaritas experienc-es. This year she looks at theconcert with mixed emotions.“It’s bittersweet,” Aldrupsaid. “It’s been so fun and I’llbe sad when I can’t do it any-more.”Ratledge said he is excitedto see what the performerscome up with this year, espe-cially since this will be the firstHilaritas for a large portion of the ensemble.“The best part for me iswatching the students,” hesaid. “The themes are alwaysinteresting and they all reallyenjoy it. This year is uniquein that about 70 percent of thechoir is new. Usually it’s theother way around with 70 per-cent of the choir being old. Weare going to have trouble fit-ting everyone on stage the waywe usually do, but it’s a goodproblem to have.”Hilaritas will be performedFriday, Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m. andSunday, Dec. 2 at 3 p.m. in theConcert Hall of Moody MusicBuilding. Ticket prices are$15 and $7 for seniors and stu-dents. Tickets go quickly andcan be purchased at uamusic.
HILARITAS
FROM PAGE 1
Hilaritas tradition toshow Nov. 30, Dec. 2
“We do not feel the terminationcreated a negative atmospherein the fraternity, but I think anyinitiated member of any fraternityfeels that each successive pledge-ship should reflect similarities totheir own, like traditional eventsor the length at which they par-ticipated in pledgeship,” Worleysaid.Worley said even though thepledges would have less involve-ment due to pledgeship endingearly, ATO’s initiation require-ments still applied.“We would not initiate anymember if they did not meet ourqualifications and if we did nothave trust in them to carry on andlead the fraternity in a positivedirection in the future,” Worleysaid.Looking back on his freshmanyear, Worley said he hates the factthe pledges have less to reflect on.“I think most people rememberthe fun and bonding with theirpledge classes that resulted fromhardships and traditional events,”Worley said.Worley said although the pres-sures and responsibilities of hisposition as secretary were chal-lenging during the termination,most of the pressure came uponhis president and pledge trainer.“The rest of the executive com-mittee and myself did our best tohelp suggest and support thosetwo to comply with university’sdecision without taking anythingaway from our pledgeship pro-cess,” Worley said.Worley said he wants to moveahead and focus on growing andpushing ATO to new heights.“I don’t think anyone was happyabout the termination, but withthe amount of issues that had aris-en throughout the fall semester,you have to respect Dean Hebson’sdecision to ultimately protect thelongevity of greek life on our cam-pus,” Worley said.Adam Sherburne, a formerpledge trainer for a fraternity hedeclined to identify for publica-tion, said his new members wereinitiated last Sunday and theirpledgeship was probably the easi-est ever at the University.“The new generation of stu-dents want to have everythinggiven to them on a silver platterand if they don’t get their waythey will either call their moms,the hazing hotline, or GreekAffairs,” Sherburne said. “I wasinfuriated with the suspensiondue to the fact that much worsethings had happened in yearspast, yet pledgeship still wenton because they were dealt withinternally.”Sherburne said if men wantto be in a fraternity, they shouldknow what they’re getting them-selves into.“If you do want to be in a fra-ternity, then shut your mouth,go through it like everyone elsehas in the past and don’t go cry-ing to mommy when somethingbad happens,” Sherburne said.“Everyone before you has donethe same, if not worse.”Sherburne said with the exit of Guy Bailey, he doesn’t know whatto expect for future pledgeship.“I have been at UA for fouryears and there has never beena problem like this,” Sherburnesaid. “Most if not all hazing will becut out and it will be a differentexperience.”JJ Butler, a senior majoring indance and a member of LambdaSigma Phi fraternity, said hethought it was unnecessary foreveryone to pay the price for theincidents that occurred in the fra-ternities investigated.“UA has never had a problemwith our fraternity or our pledge-ship process,” Butler said. “Thefact that we have to suffer underthe acts of other fraternity pledge-ships is a little unfair.”Butler said the new memberstook it upon themselves to chal-lenge one another to finish their journey through pledgeship.“Our pledges this semesterhave been initiated, and theymore than well deserve it,” Butlersaid. “They more than provedto the active brothers that theywere here to further the frater-nity’s future with a God-centeredfocus. This is where our fraternityis headed, and no one is going tostop that.”Looking back on his pledge-ship, Butler said the process forLSP has grown greatly.“Since my pledgeship back in2009, we have taken the character-building events and shaped to bemore focused around brother-hood bonding, sharing life sto-ries and challenging one anotherspiritually,” Butler said. “By doingthis, our Christian values havebeen greatly strengthened, andhave helped the active brothershome in on the guys that our fra-ternity needs to attract.”Aaron Carter, a freshmanin the Lambda Sigma Phipledge class, said he was disap-pointed when pledgeship wassuspended.“I found myself growing moreduring pledgeship than I hadin any previous time of my life,”Carter said. “I was being pushedto be my best, both in Christianand fraternal ideals, and joyfullyaccepted the challenge. I enjoyedthe tough road that was pledge-ship and was proud to earn,as opposed to simply be given,the title of a brother in LambdaSigma Phi.”
PLEDGESHIP 
FROM PAGE 1
Some call hazingpunishiment ‘unfair’
As part of these awards,Tim Hebson, the dean of stu-dents, presented StewartHolder, a senior majoringin marketing, with the Dr.Timothy S. Hebson IFC Manof the Year award. Gillan saidthis award is presented to theInterfraternity Council mem-ber who most exemplifies thespirit of the greek communityat the University.“It’s a tremendous honor. Iam very blessed to be in thisposition. I have had greatadvisors, a great Universityteam and great members of my chapter to get me to thispoint, and I can’t thank themenough,” Holder said.Holder also won theOutstanding IFC Presidentaward for his leadership of Beta Theta Pi fraternity.Among the other awardspresented were council-endowed scholarships andawards, chapter-endowedscholarships and awards,chapter excellence awards,greek excellence awards andthe Robert E. Witt Cup.Caitlin Keats, a sopho-more majoring in public rela-tions and marketing, wonthe Frances Pickens LewisEndowed Scholarship as partof the chapter-endowed schol-arship portion of the night.“I feel great,” Keats said.“It’s good to be recognized bythe greek community. Rightnow, I am an academic assis-tant for DZ, and hopefullyI will be scholarship chairright after elections. I’m hop-ing this will help me out, andI’m just really glad to be moreinvolved.”Alpha Chi Omega sororitywas presented with both theMost Outstanding PanhellenicChapter Award and the 2012Dr. Robert E. Witt cup. Gillansaid the cup is an annualaward given to a chapter thatexemplifies the ideals andvalues of The University of Alabama’s greek community.Sigma Phi Epsilon, a frater-nity that returned to campus in2010, took home five awards atthe end of the night, includingthe Outstanding ScholarshipAward, OutstandingCommunity Relations,Outstanding EducationalProgramming, OutstandingRisk Management and the2012 Most Outstanding IFCChapter Award.
“At first it’s pretty over-whelming to think aboutsince we have only been oncampus a few years,” WillMenas, a sophomore major-ing in political science, said.“I’m really proud of all thehard work my brothers andI have demonstrated so far,and these awards let usknow we’re doing somethingright and moving in the rightdirection.”
GREEK EXCELLENCE
FROM PAGE 1
Greek values praisedat awards ceremony
“I didn’t earn the first one,”Knight said. “I earned the sec-ond one. With the physical play,calls need to be called. Like I said,I didn’t earn the first one, but Imade sure I earned the secondone. I got my money’s worth.”Knight said his wife calledto make sure he was OK, andhe talked to his dad, Bob, and abuddy of his from Panama Cityduring the final 17 minutes of thegame.While Knight was in the lock-er room, his team fell apart. TheTide went on a 22-6 run, puttingthe game away.The Tide dominated inside,outscoring the Cardinals 34-22 inthe paint. Alabama also scored20 points from turnovers, out-rebounded Lamar 40-33 and got19 second chance points.Alabama was up by as muchas 30 at one point, with walk-onDakota Slaughter going on a10-2 run by himself. Slaughterfinished with 10 points in 10 min-utes, giving Alabama a neededboost off the bench.“He brings it every single dayin practice and gives us a chanceto get better,” Grant said. “He’sa guy our team trusts and everyplayers believes in his ability. I’mvery happy for him.”Alabama returns to actionthis Saturday, Dec. 1, againstCincinnati in the SEC-Big EastChallenge in Fifth Third Arenain Cincinnati, Ohio, looking toimprove on its 6-0 start. Tipoff is set for 2 p.m. CT and willbe televised by ESPN2 withthe radio broadcast availablethrough the Crimson Tide SportsNetwork. The Tide will returnhome Wednesday, Dec. 5, to faceDayton with tip-off set for 8 p.m.
BASKETBALL
FROM PAGE 1
Alabama pulls awaylate to defeat Lamar
 
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Wednesday, November 28, 2012
N
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 W 
S
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EWS
O
PINION
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ULTURE
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PORTS
Page 3
By Adrienne Burch
Staff Reporter
Freshman Elizabeth Cookwalks into her 8 a.m. chemistryclass on a Friday morning to findabout 20 percent of her class-mates scattered across a barrenauditorium.Cook, a chemical engineeringmajor, said her Chemistry 101professor does not take atten-dance for lectures, which resultsin many students skipping class.“I don’t attend that class asmuch as I should, but wheneverI do go, only 30 or so people outof a class of 150 are there,” shesaid. “The least number of peo-ple show up on Fridays, no doubtdue to ‘Thirsty Thursday’ thenight before.”The University of Alabamadoes not implement a school-wide attendance policy, thusallowing departments or indi-vidual professors to craft theirown. These policies can oftendetermine if students choose toattend class or not, which couldin turn affect a student’s gradesas studies have repeatedly foundstrong correlations betweenclass attendance and grades.Shane Street, assistant profes-sor of chemistry, said faculty inthe chemistry department hasbeen able to prove that requiringattendance leads to better over-all performance.“Members of our faculty haveshown repeatedly by analy-sis of class data that absencescorrelate strongly with poorperformance in coursework,”Street said.However, Street said he choos-es not to require attendance forhis lecture sections.“I inform students of thedemonstrable fact that studentswho attend lectures consistentlytend to do better,” he said. “Butcollege students are adults andin my opinion they can andshould decide for themselveswhether to attend a lecture.”There are departments acrosscampus that choose to utilizestrict attendance policies. BrianElmore, a junior majoring insecondary education history,cannot miss his business sta-tistics course more than fourtimes. Each additional absencewill subtract two points off hisfinal grade.“This sounds really strict, butI think this policy gives goodincentive to be punctual and pro-fessional,” Elmore said. “Thisclass has forced me to learnmore by being in class everyday.”Elmore said he thinks thestrict policies place an empha-sis on being professional, whichincludes being on time.“These professors are tryingto instill good habits in the stu-dents before they get out in the‘real world’,” he said. “Studentsoften take a bad outlook onattendance policies without real-izing they will really help themout in the long run.”Cook said she also takesclasses that have a strict policy.Attendance is 30 percent of herfinal grade in her ChemicalEngineering 125 course, whichmeets 15 times throughout thesemester. So, missing one classis a two point deduction on a stu-dent’s overall grade.“It definitely causes people toshow up to class more becauseof the threat of point loss if theymiss,” she said.She said her professor doesoffer makeup assignmentsfor excused absences, but thisrequires documentation of asickness or death in the family.Cook has to write two 400-wordessays to make up for two of herexcused absences. Official docu-mentation is often required byprofessors across campus forexcused absence approval.The foreign language depart-ment implements some of thestrictest policies, only allowingthree absences before it affects astudent’s grade significantly.Connie Janiga-Perkins, assis-tant professor of Spanish, saidattendance is required in theSpanish department because in-class practice is essential whenlearning something like a sec-ond language.“Students are acquiring anddeveloping skills and this canonly be done with regular prac-tice,” Janiga-Perkins said. “It isa bit like dancing. You have todance to learn.”Street said he understandsthere are a wide variety of opin-ions on the matter of attendancepolicies even within his owndepartment.“My opinions are my own,” hesaid. “But I don’t think (an atten-dance policy) as an improvementtrumps individual responsibilityand decision-making.”
UA leaves attendance policies up to departments
Off-campus Housing Fairgives students more options
By Krystina Pederson
Contributing Writer
The University of Alabamawill host the final off-campushousing fair for the fall semesterin the Ferguson Center on Nov.28 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.Housing and ResidentialCommunities sent out an emailNov. 26, promoting the fair andexplaining deadlines associatedwith applications for on-campushousing, priority status and theidea that housing applicantswill most likely exceed availablespace.According to the email,on-campus housing is not aguarantee.“This is a great opportunityto learn about the many housingoptions in the Tuscaloosa com-munity,” HRC said in an emailedstatement to the student body.More than 25 off-campusproperty representatives will beon campus to inform studentsabout upcoming deals, rates andamenities.According to a survey con-ducted by the University, off-campus living prices averageabout $615 to $790 a person perperson.“It’s nice being able to havean escape from the college life,and [off-campus living is] a lotcheaper,” Frances Richardson,sophomore majoring in telecom-munication and film, said.U.S. News and World Reportfound in 2011 that at TheUniversity of Alabama, 27.8percent of students live in col-lege-owned, -operated or -affili-ated housing, and 72.2 percentof students live off-campus. TheHRC website also offers severalresources, such as tenant rightshandbooks, moving guides andlease information to help stu-dents with off-campus living.
IF YOU GO...
What:
Off-CampusHousing Fair
When:
Ferguson Center
Where:
Nov. 28, 10a.m. to 2 p.m.
HERE. THERE.
EVERYWHERE.
Take your
NEWS
 with you.
Job Fair December 6th
From 11
AM
-4
PM2128 University Blvd.(Across from Moe’s BBQ)

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