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Pacific Islands Cookbook

Pacific Islands Cookbook

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Published by vcris1

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Published by: vcris1 on Nov 28, 2012
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Pacific IslandsCookbook 
ADAP Instructional Material ADAP 94-4
A publication of the Land Grant institutions of the Pacific:
American Samoa Community College, College of Micronesia, NorthernMarianas College, University of Guam, and University of Hawai’i,through the Agricultural Development in the American Pacific (ADAP)Project. Funded through the US Department of AgricultureCooperative State Research Service.
ADAP Directors:
SALEI’A AFELE-FA’AMULIAmerican Samoa Community CollegeCHIN T. LEEUniversity of GuamANITA SUTACollege of MicronesiaANTONIO SANTOS Northern Marianas College NOEL P. KEFFORDUniversity of Hawai’i
PACIFIC ISLANDS COOKBOOK Compiled by:
MICHAEL T. HARRINGTONAIMS CoordinatoCARMEN MEYER Computer Graphics & Layout
The sole rights to reproduction of any component of thispublication rest with the ADAP Project.
Printed July, 1994ISBN 1-931435-391
For additional copies, contact:
AIMSADAP ProjectUniversity of Hawai’i3050 Maile WayHonolulu, Hawai’i 96822Tel: (808) 956-8140Fax: (808) 956-6967
 
Pacific IslandsCookbook 
AIMS Nutrition Work Team Participants
Salei’a Afele-Fa’amuli
 American Samoa Community College
Ansina Kony
College of Micronesia
Floria James
 Northern Marianas College
Loreto Malimban
University of Guam
Rebbeca Pobocik 
University of Guam
Naomi Kanehiro
University of Hawai’i
Resource Persons
Patricia BrittenJoda DerricksonLisa MillerRachel NovotnyAnne Shovic
University of Hawai’i
The ADAP Project is an equal opportunity employer. All servicesand information are available to anyone without regard to race, color,religion, sex, age, or national origin.
 
Table of Contents
The Importance of Local Foods....................................................................................
1
Estimated Nutritional Values....................................................................................
2
Eating Within the Food Guide Pyramid....................................................................................
4
Coconut....................................................................................
Green Leaves & Vegetables..................................................................................
10
Papaya..................................................................................
32
Mango..................................................................................
48 
Banana..................................................................................
58 
Breadfruit..................................................................................
74
Taro..................................................................................
86 
Yam................................................................................
102
Sweet Potato................................................................................
110
Cassava................................................................................
120
Fish & Meat................................................................................
128 
The Importance of Local Foods
This cookbook has been compiled from recipes used in the Pacificislands, for the purpose of promoting the use of local foods. The importanceand value of local foods can be addressed from many different perspectives.It is our hope that this cookbook can play a role in maintaining and develop-ing cultural strengths, economic self-sufficiency, and healthy populations inthe region.Local or ethnic foods, like language, are corner-stones of culture andidentity. As the world becomes a global village many foods and recipes areshared and mixed between different places and groups. In many of thefarthest reaches of the Pacific region, packaged foods have gone from highlyprized commodities (canned beef) to everyday ingredients. Yet whetherliving at home, in Auckland, Los Angeles, or Tokyo; most islanders wouldidentify their traditional staples and local dishes as an important part of anyfamily gathering, holiday or ceremony.The cultural values of food are not just related to eating familiaritems, but also knowing where and how they were produced. Better yet is tohave grown the produce, raised the livestock, and prepared the foods withmembers of your family and community. Although modern life has drawnmany Pacific islanders from rural, agricultural work to cities and desk jobs,there is still a strong need for a connection to the land.From an economic standpoint, producing at least a portion of onesown food is a critical component of self-sufficiency for individuals andnations. Farmers and small food processors provide local employment andkeep the cash flow close to home. There are also factors of food security (aconstant supply) and safety, knowing what goes into the production andprocessing of available foods.Finally, local foods and traditional diets are not fads. They haveevolved within the environment where they are found. Pacific islanders havemaintained healthy lives in these places for thousands of years. However,contemporary lifestyles, with their new foods and work patterns have beenaccompanied by increases in diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure and/orheart disease. There is a clear need to identify recipes and their nutrientanalyses as a means to reverse this trend.1

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