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11.29.12

11.29.12

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Thursday, November 29, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 63
 
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        •
Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................8
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports .....................14Puzzles ....................13Classifieds .............. 13
Clear
63º/37º
Friday 68º/45º
Partly cloudy
 
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NEWS
PAGE 7 Theatre Tuscaloosa’s newest production opens soon.
GODSPELL
GeorgiaSouthern50.1%GeorgiaState58.6%Ole Miss58.6%Florida78.4%PennState78.4%San JoseState80.2%FIU79.5%NorthTexas50.9%Arkansas73%SouthCarolina75.6%Tennessee75.4%LSU76.5%Tenn.-Chattanooga47.9%MississippiState63.1%Texas A&M78.7%MississippiState79.3%Ole Miss79.3%LSU74.4%Tennessee76.5%Vanderbilt76.5%Arkansas79.8%KentState74.5%NorthTexas79.8%FAU70.3%WesternKentucky70.3%WesternCarolina35.3%Auburn65.7%Auburn63.8%
2012
13,638
5,995
201120102009
Highest AttendanceLowest Attendance
17,000 seats per game
100%attendance
An open records request revealed these attendance numbersfor Bryant-Denny’s student sections between 2009 and 2012.Each box represents a game’s attendance by students accordingto the number of ACT Cards swiped in at the stadium gates.
 
Georga%0.eorga
 
tate8.6%5Mss.ra.enn
 
ae.an Josetate..ortexas0.9%ransas
 
A
 
%7outarona.nessee
 
T.4%
 
5776.5%Tenn.-Cattanooga.9%4sssspte.1%as A&Me.7%8ssssppe.3%9e ss9.3%4.4%nessen%.7er%.7ansasr.
 
enae.NortTexas79.8.esernentucy
 
0.3%esternarona.Auurn5.7%Auurn.
2012
5,995
201120102009
gest Attenanceowest Attendance
7,seatspergame
ttendance
An open recors request reveae tese attenance numersor Bryant-Denny’s stuent sectons etween 2009 an 2012.Eac ox represents a games attenance y stuents accorngto te numer o ACT Cars swpe n at te staum gates.
By Abbey Crain
Staff Reporter
To many students, RVs are just anoth-er burden on Gameday, forcing themoff their own parking lots to make wayfor gargantuan tailgating contraptions.But, for this special breed of tailgaters,Alabama football is more than a team toroot for.Nick Frenz, assistant director of eventmanagement and transportation, said onany given gameday there are 390, usu-ally full, RV parking spots spread overcampus.That doesnot includethe 100 freeRV park-ing spotslocated off campus onMcFarlandBoulevard.Sheilaand MikeHuddleston,Huntsville,Ala., natives and parents to twoAlabama alumnae, have been tailgat-ing with their RV for nine years. Theygot their RV specifically for Alabamafootball games so their oldest daughter,a former member of Crimson Cabaret,could easily join them in their tailgatingactivities. They have even gone so far asstoring their RV in the Tuscaloosa areato make the trip a little less daunting.“My daughters were very involvedon campus and always wanted to comedown and see us and go to the foot-ball games,” Sheila Huddleston said.“Because it’s so hard to get hotel rooms,we decided to stay to tailgate so wecould all enjoy it together. We havefriends over there [at the RV lots] andthen friends from Huntsville come andeveryone brings food and has a goodtime.”
GamedayRVers formculture alltheir own
CULTURE
| FOOTBALL
Fans gather days before agame, celebrate after wins
Because it’s so hard to gethotel rooms, we decided tostay to tailgate so we couldall enjoy it together.
— Sheila HuddlestonSEE
RV
PAGE 9
By Sarah Elizabeth Tooker 
Staff Reporter
Many University of Alabamastudents have been waiting for theCrimson Tide to return to the SECfootball championship, and for alot of these students, it’s becausethe Atlanta area is what many of them call home.Chris Bryant, a Universityspokesperson, said this year’sfreshman class includes 543 stu-dents from Georgia, with 435 of them hailing from the Atlantaarea. Total enrollment fromGeorgia also continues to rise,surging from 2,227 students in fall2011 to 2,322 in fall 2012.Attending and winning thisgame means a lot to most of thesestudents, as many of their highschool friends chose to attend TheUniversity of Georgia. One studenttraveling to the game this week-end, Sean Reach, a junior major-ing in operations management,is actually from Athens, Ga., thehometown of the Tide’s opponent.“This game is just as importantto me as last year’snational champi-onship and thisyear’s too,” Reachsaid. “I’ve had togrow up listeningto their delusionalexpectations everyyear and wouldlove nothing betterthan to see all myfriends’ disappointed faces whilethey watch me celebrate again.”Some students from Atlantaheading back for the game areexcited to avoid the steep hotelroom prices and will invite friendsto stay in their homes for the game.Riley Snider, a junior majoring infinance, said all students shouldmake the effort to come, whetherthey have a ticket or not.“All of my roommates, as well asmany other friends, will be arriv-ing at my house onFriday afternoonfor the game,”Snider said. “Forthose who do nothave a ticket, Iwould recommendtailgating aroundthe Georgia Domebefore the gameand taking Martato the Buckheadarea to watch itat the many sports bars aroundthe area. This is where most col-lege kids will be hanging out andcheering on the Tide.”
Students head home for game
NEWS
| FOOTBALL
NEWS
| CITY COUNCIL
I know a ton of people aregoing to watch the game inBuckhead, and a few of thepopular bars there are Stout,Peachtree Tavern and EastAndrews.
— Mary Katherine Sweeney
Atlanta-area fans skiphigh hotel, food costs
SEE
ATLANTA
PAGE 2
By Adrienne Burch
Staff Reporter
With enrollment at The University of Alabama growing each year, the city of Tuscaloosa has responded with majoradditions and renovations to the down-town area to help better serve this influxof students.Ground is expected to be broken ona new upscale hotel in the spring, thecity council just approved the renova-tion of the old PNC bank building to addover 100 apartments to the downtownarea, and the Riverwalk area along theBlack Warrior River has exploded inrecent years with the addition of theAmpitheater and Rivermarket.“What we are seeing today is the cul-mination of planning that has been goingon for a few years now,” Mayor WaltMaddox said. “We are taking advantageof the growth of the University, and com-mercial and residential are working inharmony to bring vibrancy to the down-town area.”Maddox said with the geographic loca-tion of the University so close to thedowntown area, it is only natural forthere to be a synergy between the two.Lee Garrison, Tuscaloosa city council-man for District 4, said he definitelybelieves student growth has been essen-tial in pushing the city to renovate down-town.“The student growth has defiantlyimpacted Tuscaloosa in a positive way,”he said. “Now the city has to respond tothese challenges. Downtown is continu-ing to evolve in a positive way.”
Downtown Tuscaloosa willundergo major renovations
City will break ground onnew hotel, PNC building tobecome apartment complex
SEE
DOWNTOWN
PAGE 2
By Marc Torrence
Assistant Sports Editor
Alabama fans are greeted witha familiar sight as kickoff nears fora football game in Bryant-DennyStadium. It’s as common as see-ing the Million Dollar Band on thefield or the pre-game “Tradition”video.Only this one isn’t so inspiring.The upper deck student section,where students are sent once thelower bowl has reached capac-ity, is never filled and has becomean eyesore for many fans. It’s ablemish on what some say wouldotherwise be the most spectacularsight in college football – 101,000-plus fans packed into one stadiumto watch a football game.The student section has neverfilled up completely, or even comeclose, according to informationreceived from The University of Alabama under an open-recordsrequest.Alabama’s season openeragainst San Jose State in 2010drew the most students since 2008,when the University started usingACT Cards for football tickets, theearliest that data was made avail-able. Of the 17,000 seats given tostudents, only 13,638 were filled forthe game. That means 3,362 ticketswent unused, and the section was just over 80 percent capacity.
Student section hasn’t filled to capacity aslong as attendance has been recorded
SEE
ATTENDANCE
PAGE 10
CW | Sarah Grace Moorehead
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
 
LUNCH
SteakChicken CacciatoreChicken Fajita PizzaBaked Yukon Gold PotatoesVegetable Orzo SoupSteamed Brussel SproutsSouthwest Garbanzo BeanCake (Vegetarian)
FRESH FOOD
LUNCH
Buttermilk Fried ChickenGrilled Sausage with Onions &PeppersBaked BeansSeasoned RiceCreamed SpinachSummer Harvest Macaroni &Cheese (Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Chicken CreoleClassic Tuna SaladCinnamon French ToastStewed OkraSeasoned RiceCarrot Raisin SaladMu Shu Tofu (Vegetarian)
ON THE MENU
LAKESIDEFRIDAY 
 What:
Hilaritas
 Where:
Moody MusicBuilding
 When:
7:30 p.m.
 What:
12 Days of Wellness
 Where:
Russell Hall Lobby
 When:
11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
 What:
Where Are You,Christmas?
 Where:
Bama Theatre
 When:
5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
TODAY 
What:
Trivia Night
Where:
Wilhagans
When:
8 p.m.
What:
CLC Movie Night:City of God
Where:
241 B.B. Comer
When:
6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
What:
Percussion Ensemble
Where:
Moody MusicBuilding
When:
7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY 
What:
Saturday in the Park:Ornaments from Nature
Where:
MoundvilleArchaeological Park
When:
10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
 What:
Shenanigans and BeerComedy
Where:
Green Bar
When:
7 p.m.
 What:
Theatre Tuscaloosapresents Godspell
Where:
Bean-Brown Theatreat Shelton State CommunityCollege
When:
7:30 p.m.
ON THE RADAR 
GO
GO
Page 2• Thursday,November 29, 2012
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036Advertising: 348-7845Classifieds: 348-7355
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348-8995Advertising Managercwadmanager@gmail.com
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Territory Manager 348-2598Classified Manager 348-7355
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Special Projects Managerosmspecialprojects@gmail.com
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348-8042Creative Services Manager
Robert Clark 
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348-8735
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osmspecialprojects2@gmail.com
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osmspecialprojects2@gmail.com
 Will Tucker
editor-in-chiefeditor@cw.ua.edu
 Ashley Chaffin
managing editor
Stephen Dethrage
production editor
Mackenzie Brown
visuals editor
Daniel Roth
online editormagazine editor
Melissa Brown
news editornewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Lauren Ferguson
culture editor
Marquavius Burnett
sports editor
SoRelle Wyckoff
opinion editor
 Ashanka Kumari 
chief copy editor
Shannon Auvil
photo editor
 Anna Waters
lead designer
 Whitney Hendrix 
lead graphic designer
 Alex Clark 
community manager
 
FOLLOW US ONTWITTER@THECRIMSONWHITE VISIT US ONLINE ATCW.UA.EDU
 
LUNCH
Salisbury Steak withMushroomsHome-style Spaghetti &MeatballsLima Beans with BaconHome-style Mashed PotatoesGrilled Vegetable PizzaSpinach ParmesanQuiche(Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Roast Beef Turkey Soup with BrownRiceLinguine with Roasted RedPeppersSteamed Green PeasRoasted Red PotatoesTofu Fajita (Vegetarian)
BURKE
Another student headingback to her Atlanta home,Mary Katherine Sweeney, a junior majoring in chemistry,said she knows a lot of stu-dents from both schools will betraveling to Atlanta, providingplenty of fun tailgates for col-lege students.“I know a ton of people aregoing to watch the game inBuckhead, and a few of thepopular bars there are Stout,Peachtree Tavern and EastAndrews,” Sweeney said. “I’vealready talked to my friendswho go to UGA, and they are just as excited for the game. Itwill be a great matchup, espe-cially with the national cham-pionship on the line.”Maggie Dixon, president of the Alabama Alumni group inAtlanta, invited all studentsand fans to attend the tailgatesthey host before and duringthe game at Hudson Grille inmidtown and Twisted Taco inRoswell.“Hudson Grille is moreof a younger crowd and canhold up to 1,000 people, whileTwisted Taco caters moreto a family environment,”Dixon said. “People should getthere early if they want a seatbecause even though we’rean Alabama bar, some of theGeorgia people might comesince, unfortunately, they’reall over the place.”Dixon said she is notconcerned with Alabama fansacting too wild, despite thelarge crowds expected.“I’ve told all of the alumnithat Alabama is classy, andwe keep our comments to our-selves,” Dixon said. “At theend of the game, the scorewill speak volumes. I admit Ihave a distaste for Auburn, butnothing will be more gloriousthan beating Georgia.”
One of the largest projectscurrently underway down-town is the construction of aneight-story Embassy Suiteshotel on the northwest cornerof Greensboro Avenue andUniversity Boulevard.The Tuscaloosa City Councilapproved Kemmons WilsonInc. contracting company’splans for the hotel last year,and they are set to begin con-struction in spring 2013 withan expected completion date inJuly 2014.“There is a clear need foran upscale hotel in the city of Tuscaloosa,” McLean Wilson,vice president of KemmonsWilson Inc. said.The hotel will feature 154bedrooms, an indoor pool, 5,300square feet of meeting spaceand a fine-dining restaurant onthe street level.Councilwoman CynthiaAlmond said the process of planning this hotel has beenlong, but it will be worth it inthe end.“We will see downtown cometo life,” she said. “The hotelwill be well used.”Garrison said he is alsoexcited about the conversionof the old PNC bank build-ing on the northeast cornerof University Boulevard andGreensboro Avenue intoapartments.Heritage Land andDevelopment Co. LLC out of Memphis, Tenn., announcedthis month they will convertthe top eight floors of the build-ing into 100 one- and two-bed-room apartments.“This will bring more bod-ies to the downtown area,”Garrison said. “The privatesector economy will just con-tinue to improve.”Garrison said he believesmuch of the reason many of the private sector projects arebeginning is because of thepublic investments made overrecent years to improve thedowntown area. Some of thepublic investments includethe new Federal Building andimproving streetscapes.“Improving the area attract-ed these private investors,” hesaid. “Good public and privateinvestments are what make fora solid downtown area.”Garrison said he is alsoworking on plans to better con-nect the downtown area to TheUniversity of Alabama campus.“We want to make it a seam-less connection between theFederal Building and theStrip,” he said.Garrison said this willinvolve improving sidewalks,streets and utilities in thisarea. He compared this reno-vation to the connection madebetween campus and down-town along Bryant Drive. Healso said the city hopes to addpublic transportation optionsto carry students from campusto downtown.One of the major publicinvestments the city has madefor the downtown area has alsobeen the revitalization of theTuscaloosa Riverwalk areaalong the Black Warrior River.Wendy Riggs, director of Artsand Entertainment for the City,oversees the Rivermarket,Tuscaloosa Amphitheater andthe Transportation Museum.All three of these attrac-tions have been built overthe past two years, with theAmphitheater in its second sea-son and the Rivermarket andmuseum opening last April.The Tuscaloosa Amphitheaterwas one of the first attractionsbrought to the downtown andRiverwalk area in recent years,and it has spurred on much of future growth. The 7,470-capac-ity venue has brought manybig-name headlining acts toTuscaloosa including LukeBryan, Kelly Clarkson and TheAvett Brothers.“A lot has changed since theopening of the Amphitheater,”Riggs said. “It brought livemusic back to the downtownarea.”The River Walk also recentlylaunched its Holidays on theRiver project featuring an icerink open until Jan. 6, 2013,with appearances by Santa,holiday films and train rides.“We are really excited andhope students take advantageof these opportunities,” Riggssaid.Mayor Maddox said the cityis not close to finished withthe downtown and Riverwalkareas.“We have been talking aboutdowntown for years, and we’renot done yet,” he said.
ATLANTA
FROM PAGE 1
Atlanta offers spotsfor ticketless students
DOWNTOWN
FROM PAGE 1
Downtown growswith student body
From MCT Campus
WASHINGTON — TheObama administration tempo-rarily banned the energy giantBP from new federal contracts,citing the company’s “lack of business integrity as demon-strated” by the April 2010 Gulf of Mexico disaster.The EnvironmentalProtection Agency’s decisionWednesday comes two weeksafter BP entered into a wide-ranging settlement agreementwith the Justice Departmentover criminal charges in con-nection with the DeepwaterHorizon disaster, which killed11 men, spewed nearly 200million gallons of oil into theocean and turned into thecountry’s worst offshore envi-ronmental catastrophe.The impact of the ban onBP’s financial health woulddepend on how long it lastsand whether it keeps the com-pany from bidding on lucrativefederal leases to tap oil andgas in places like the Gulf of Mexico, said Phil Weiss, seniorenergy analyst for ArgusResearch. Hours after theban was issued, the InteriorDepartment announced alease sale on more than 20million offshore acres in thewestern Gulf. BP did notparticipate.“If it happens once, it’sinconvenient for BP, but notthat big of a deal,” Weiss said.“If it happens twice, threetimes, then the impact startsto escalate. The best way to dodeepwater is to get the acreagebefore it has been explored,when it is cheapest. Deepwaterdrilling is very important toBP, and that would have a bigimpact.”The EPA said such suspen-sions are “a standard practicewhen a responsibility ques-tion is raised by action in acriminal case.” It said thesuspension would be liftedwhen “the company can pro-vide sufficient evidence to EPAdemonstrating that it meetsfederal business standards.”In separate statements,the EPA and BP underscoredthat the temporary suspen-sion would only affect futurecontracts, not existing leasesto develop oil and gas in theUnited States, where BP’sholdings are vast.The company issued a state-ment that suggested it is work-ing with the EPA to get the banlifted soon.“The EPA’s action is pur-suant to administrativeprocedures providing for dis-cretionary suspension untila company can demonstrate‘present responsibility’ to con-duct business with the U.S.government,” BP said. “BP hasbeen in regular dialogue withthe EPA and has already pro-vided both a present responsi-bility statement of more than100 pages and supplementalanswers to the EPA’s questionsbased on that submission.”A separate federal civil law-suit over possible violationsof the Clean Water Act, setto proceed in February, couldbring penalties in the billionsof dollars against BP.
BP shut out of US contracts; feds cite deadly blast, poor response
 
HERE. THERE.
EVERYWHERE.
Take your
NEWS
 with you.
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Thursday, November 29, 2012
N
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 W 
S
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EWS
O
PINION
C
ULTURE
S
PORTS
Page 3
By Colby Leopard
Staff Reporter
With the Crimson Tide’s datewith the Georgia Bulldogs inthe SEC Championship gamelooming, this should be a timefor students to be excited aboutcheering on the team. Instead,many students will be watch-ing the game from Tuscaloosabecause they didn’t receivea student ticket from theUniversity.Some students who expectedto satisfy the hours require-ment were disappointed whenthey realized study abroad ortransfer credits didn’t count fortickets, though the Universityaccepts them for academiccredit.Daniel Gilstrap, a seniormajoring in exercise sciencefrom Madison, Miss., thoughthe had a good shot at gettinga ticket to the game becauseof his upperclassmen status.When he did not get a confirma-tion email from the Universityabout the SEC Championshipgame, Gilstrap looked closelyat his UA credit hours and real-ized the classes he took whilestudying abroad in Australiadidn’t count towards ticketallotment.“If you studied abroad, like Idid, you can pretty much guar-antee you won’t get a ticket,”Gilstrap said. “The 12 hoursI took while abroad are whatkept me from being in Atlantathis year cheering on NickSaban and the boys. It’s kindof sad that as a fourth-yearsenior I don’t even have theoption to buy a ticket to the SECChampionship game this year,or any of the bowl games ourteam has been to since the 2009season for that matter.”Gilstrap said he is disappoint-ed that ticket allotment processis not only penalizing him forstudying abroad, but rewardingstudents that don’t graduate infour years.“I don’t think it’s fair that if you graduate in four years,you most likely won’t get tocheer on the Tide at a gameoutside of the regular season,”Gilstrap said. “There are a lotof students who take five yearsto graduate now, and they arethe ones benefiting from thecurrent system. It needs to berevised so other students whosupport the University for fouryears at least have the opportu-nity to buy a ticket.”Kirby Simpson, a seniormajoring in marketing fromMontgomery, Ala., is also disap-pointed to not attend the SECChampionship game.After attending AuburnUniversity at Montgomeryfor three semesters, Simpsontransferred to Alabama as asophomore according to hiscredit hours. Simpson said thehours he accumulated whileat AUM did not count towardsticket allotment for the SECChampionship game, and thatis why he won’t be attending.“While I may not have startedat UA as a freshman, I am stilla senior and friends with otherseniors that got a ticket to thegame,” Simpson said. “I feel likeI should be in the in-group withthem, and we should all be ableto attend a game together sincethis is the last chance we will beable to do so as students.”Simpson blames theUniversity for distributing theSEC Championship ticketsunfairly.“I think the system is designedto look like everyone has a fairshot at getting a ticket, sort of like a senior privilege, but whatthe University is actually doingis rewarding those that havepaid them the most money intuition,” Simpson said.Chris Bryant, assistant direc-tor of media relations, said 1,920tickets were allotted to studentsby the University, 12 percent of the 16,000 total tickets Alabamahad to distribute. Of the 1,920tickets, 80 percent are given toundergraduate students and 20percent are given to graduatestudents. In order to distributethe tickets evenly to undergrad-uate students with the mostUA credit hours, students hadto have a minimum of 90 hoursfrom the University.Bryant said the ticket allot-ment process was designed bythe University with the helpof the Student GovernmentAssociation to distribute ticketsamongst students fairly.
“The method was developedand is refined with input andguidance from the SGA in anattempt to distribute ticketsto students in as equitable amanner as possible,” Bryantsaid.
Gilstrap believes the cur-rent ticket allotment system isflawed. He suggested the ticketsbe rewarded to students basedon more than just UA credithours.“I don’t agree with the pro-cess of giving tickets based onUA hours alone,” Gilstrap. “Weneed to establish a point systemwhere students receive a certainnumber of points for going to allsporting events. Those studentswho attend a lot of Alabamaathletic events, not just football,should have priority to qualifyfor SEC Championship andbowl game tickets.”
By Judah Martin
Contributing Writer
The field of social workhrives on human interaction,a quality The University of labama’s social work depart-ent seeks to promote in itstudents through communitynvolvement.This is precisely why a groupf graduate students fromames and Joanne Terrell’sSocial Work Practice withCommunities courses teamedp with the Tuscaloosa Policeepartment to host the Eastuscaloosa Community Healthair from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.Saturday, Dec. 1 at the Jayceesairground in Alberta City.The fair is open to the east-rn side of Tuscaloosa andhe Alberta City area and willeature free health screeningsand information, interactiveames, door prizes, familyactivities and refreshments.Graduate students playeda key role in planning theealth fair by establishing aoat drive, securing merchantonations, working with radioand television for public ser-ice announcements, and coor-inating the general logisticsor the event.“Many of our students havenot had the opportunity tonetwork with a public agen-cy such as [the] TuscaloosaPolice Department, nor workat a community level askingfor donations and securingvendors such as The MaudeWhatley clinic, the Red Crossand the wonderful area mer-chants that donated the food,”James Terrell said. “This isalso a learning opportunity towork and coexist in a groupof diverse students with acommon goal.”Thomas Sorrells, a first-yeargraduate student in JoanneTerrell’s class, helped to planthe logistics of the fair andworked to bring in local healthand social service providers.“Participation in a projectlike this benefits studentsof social work immensely,”Sorrels said. “It’s a first stepout of the classroom and intothe real world of organiza-tional, administrative and evenpolitical agenda setting. It’straining in how to get thingsdone. Most importantly, it’s alesson in what social work isreally about at its core: becom-ing an advocate for those inneed.”Sorrels conducted a coatdrive with his team and saidthey will hand them out atthe fair. He said many of theorganizations present will beaccepting donations.“The fair is mainly a wayto provide the vulnerable andunderserved populations of East Tuscaloosa – those dis-placed or dispossessed by thetornado, the economicallydisadvantaged, those withoutaccess to affordable healthcare– with health screenings andinformation,” Sorrells said.“We hope it will be a lot of funfor all who attend.”Kearsee Gill, a first-yeargraduate student in the schoolof social work, also worked toplan the health fair. She saidher job is to locate resourcesfor community members inneed.Gill said the term resourceencompasses a broad rangeof services, including housingand medical assistance as wellas providing clothes.“I have chosen not to takethe ‘I am just a student’ atti-tude,” Gill said. “Honestly, Ihave enjoyed dedicating mytime and efforts going busi-ness-to-business and door-to-door to see what the commu-nity needs. I have learned thatno one knows what the com-munity needs better than thecommunity.”
Transfer credit hours keepsome students from game
Social work studentshost local health fair

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