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Mauritius Reunion Seychelles Contents

Mauritius Reunion Seychelles Contents

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10/30/2012

 
      M     A     U     R     I     T     I     U     S
 A   U R  I   T  I    U  S  
lonelyplanet.com
PORT LOUIS •• History
Mauritius is a fascinating, world-in-one-island slice of paradise, the very name of whichconjures up images of tropical luxury and stupendous extravagance. While in many placesfamed for cobalt-blue seas, white sandy beaches and luxury hotels you may eventually findyourself wishing for something other than sunbathing and swimming to do, in Mauritiusit’s often hard to know what to do next, so full is it of historic sights, cultural diversity, geo-graphic variation and almost limitless activities to distract you from the daily grind of beachand pool. Despite all this, perhaps the island’s single biggest asset is the relaxed charm of its warm and welcoming people.Mauritius is the most developed of the Mascarene Islands, but with a bit of effort andresourcefulness you can escape the crowds and find your own patch of this most diverseof destinations. The smells, noises and bustle of the mercantile capital Port Louis, Africa’swealthiest city, are never far away, while the busy garment markets in the Central Plateautowns of Quatre Bornes and Curepipe and the dramatic virgin forests of the Black RiverGorges National Park give the lie to Mauritius being just another beach destination. But whatbeaches though – from the stunning sand-rimmed lagoons and popular wide public beachesto the picturesque islands off the country’s coastline, there’s truly something for everyonehere. Add to this the joys of Chinese, Indian, French and African cuisine, the rousing beatof 
séga
music and the infectious party spirit of the locals, and you soon understand whyMauritius really is so many people’s idea of paradise on earth.
Mauritius
CLIMATE & WHEN TO GO
Mauritius enjoys a typically tropical climatewith year-round heat, although the southeasttrade winds help it never to feel too muggy.The summer months are from December toApril, when it can nevertheless be extremely humid, and the winter, such as it is, runs fromMay to November, and is cooler and drier.The best months to visit Mauritius are May to early December. January and February, the
peak cyclone months, are best avoided by 
water-sports enthusiasts and divers. Cyclonesrarely hit Mauritius (although Rodrigues hassuffered far more regularly than the main-land) but cyclones way out at sea can bringdays of squally rain.Coastal temperatures range between 25°Cand 33°C in summer and between 18°C and
24°C in winter. On the plateau it will be
some 5°C cooler. The highlands are also thewettest part of the island – it can rain hereat any time of year, and even when it’s notraining the area can be cloaked in low-lyingcloud.When the winds are at their strongest in
July and August it can be blustery on the
east coast, though the breeze brings welcome
relief in summer.
Apart from the Christmas-New Year peak,
Mauritius doesn’t really have high and low seasons. The situation is more dependent on
outside factors (such as the French school
holidays, which cause a big increase in de-mand and prices in August).
PORT LOUIS
pop 172,000
With its spectacular setting beneath the im-
pressive mountain peaks of Le Pouce and
Pieter Both, Port Louis makes an impressionon anyone arriving on the main road from
the airport – descending from the Central
Plateau into the hectic city centre with the
Indian Ocean spread out in a perspective-
defying frieze above the city is a wonderfulexperience.
Despite being the national capital, the
main economic hub and the biggest city in
the country, Port Louis occupies a rather
strange place in the psyche of modern Mau-ritius. Its low-lying position has historically made it an undesirable locale, with disease
in the 18th and 19th centuries frequently devastating it, meaning that the profes-
sional classes have traditionally lived outsidethe city, particularly in the Central Plateautowns of Rose Hill, Moka, Vacoas and Qua-
tre Bornes. This trend continues today, tothe extent that Port Louis (the final s isusually silent, although many Mauritianspronounce it when speaking English) can
sometimes seem like a city without a mid-dle class, without a centre and a ghost townafter dark.This impression is totally false, however –Port Louis has plenty going for it, but it’s acity that profits from exploration: those whoonly visit the fantastically Disneyesque Cau-dan Waterfront will get a very bland impres-sion of the national capital. The bustle andchaos of the streets, the city’s famous market,Chinatown, the collection of museums andsome wonderfully preserved colonial build-ings make Port Louis far more than a placeto come for some pricey shopping away fromthe beach.
HISTORY 
Port Louis was first settled in the 17th century by the Dutch, who called it Noordt WesterHaven. It was the French governor BertrandFrançois Mahé de Labourdonnais, however,who took the initiative and developed it intoa busy capital and port after 1736. Labour-
donnais is commemorated with a much-
photographed statue at the seaward end of 
Place S Bissoondoyal (formerly Place d’Armes),
the square that marks the city centre.
Few cities have bounced back from asmany natural disasters as Port Louis, orPort Napoleon as it was known briefly inthe early 19th century before the Britishtook the island. Between 1773 and 1892 aseries of fires, plagues and tropical stormsall tried, and failed, to level the town. In1819 cholera arrived from Manila on the
frigate
Topaz,
killing an estimated 700 PortLouis residents. Things quietened down until
1866, when malaria suddenly appeared onthe scene, causing a further 3700 fatalities.
Around this time people started heading forthe cooler (and healthier) Central Plateau, sothe town’s population was mercifully small
when the 1892 cyclone whipped through,
and destroyed 3000 homes.
The 20th century has seen Port Louisbecome one of Africa’s most importantfinancial centres and ports – to which the
HIGHLIGHTS
Getting off the beaten path in charming,undeveloped
south Mauritius
(p111) 
Diving at the Rempart Serpent and LaCathédrale off the gorgeous beaches of 
 Flic en Flac
(p103) 
Discovering a totally different side to Mau-ritius on the beautiful island of 
Rodrigues
(p122) 
Exploring the chaotic back streets of themulticultural capital
Port Louis
(opposite) 
Walking in the lush, dramatic landscapesof the
Black River Gorges National Park 
 (p87)
 I N D I AO C E A N 
RÉUNIONSEYCHELLESSEYCHELLESMAURITIUS
TELEPHONE CODE: 230
POPULATION: 1.25 MILLION
AREA: 2040 SQ KM
© Lonely Planet Publications
54 55
 
      M     A     U     R     I     T     I     U     S
PORT LOUIS •• Orientation
lonelyplanet.com
 A   U R  I   T  I    U  S  
lonelyplanet.com
PORT LOUIS •• Sights & Activities
ever-growing number of high-rise glass-
fronted banks in the city centre attest.
ORIENTATION
Port Louis is divided by Mauritius’ only 
motorway, which runs just by the harbour
area and the development of the Caudan
Waterfront. On the Caudan side there’s thesanitised city with smart shops and bars butwith little atmosphere, while the vast ma- jority of the city is on the other side of theroad – dirty, colourful, chaotic and muchmore fun.The centre of the city is hard to pin downexactly – the natural centre is Place S Bissoon-doyal, a picturesque palm-lined avenue thatruns from the harbour to Government House.From here nearly all the sites of interest arewithin easy walking distance. The main bankshave their offices around this square or alongnearby Sir William Newton St, while Royal St,which runs northeast through Chinatown, isalso of interest to travellers.Port Louis’ two main bus stations are lo-
cated either side of the city centre, each a
few minutes’ walk from Place S Bissoondoyal.Arriving from the airport, you’ll be dropped
at the more southerly Victoria Square
bus station.
INFORMATION
Bookshops
Bookcourt
(
%
211 9262; Caudan Waterfront) Thecountry’s best bookshop sells a broad range of English andFrench books, including guidebooks.
Editions de L’Ocean Indien
(
%
211 1310; JulesKoenig St) A good selection of titles about Mauritius.
Librairie Allot Ltd
(
%
212 7132; 1st fl, Happy WorldHouse, Sir William Newton St) Usually stocks the IGN mapof Mauritius and a good selection of literature.
Librairie du Trèfle
(
%
212 1106; 5 Royal St) Anatmospheric place catering for the local market.
Emergency
Ambulance
(
%
114)
Fire services
(
%
995)
Police
(
%
emergency 999, headquarters 203 1212; LineBarracks, Lord Kitchener St)
Internet Access
Cyber Café
(
%
210 6978; Dumat St;
h
9am-4pm Mon-Fri)A small place near the Victoria Sq bus station.
Smart Net Café
(
%
210 2177; Ramphul Bldg, ChauséeSt;
h
9am-4pm Mon-Fri, 9am-noon Sat) Small butcentrally located.
Zenith Internet Café
(Astrolabe, Port Louis Waterfront;
h
10am-8pm Mon-Thu, 10am-10pm Fri & Sat, 10am-4pmSun) The best in town, with plug-in for laptops possible.
 Medical Services
Dr Jeetoo Hospital
(
%
212 3201; Volcy Pougnet St)Provides 24-hour medical and dental treatment and has a24-hour pharmacy. Staff speak English and French.
Medical Trading Pharmacy
(
%
294 0440; ChauséeSt) One of the best pharmacies in the city, just by CompanyGardens.
Money
You’ll find ATMs throughout Port Louis,while all the main banks are concentratedaround Sir William Newton St. Standard
banking hours are 9am to 3.15pm Monday toThursday, 9am to 3.30pm Friday. Some banks
are open on Saturday mornings, while those at
the airport are open whenever flights arrive.
Barclays
(
%
207 1800; Sir William Newton St)
HSBC
(
%
203 8333; Pl S Bissoondoyal)
Mauritius Commercial Bank
(MCB;
%
202 5000;9-15 Sir William Newton St)
State Bank
 
of Mauritius
(
%
202 1111; State BankTower, Pl S Bissoondoyal)
Post
Central post office
(
%
208 2851; Place du Quai;
h
8.15am-4pm Mon-Fri, 8.15-11.45am Sat) The last 45minutes before closing are for stamp sales only.
Tourist Information
Mauritius Tourism Promotion Authority
(MTPA;
%
210 1545; www.mauritius.net; Air Mauritius Centre,President John Kennedy St;
h
9am-4pm Mon-Fri, 9am-noon Sat) Distributes maps of Port Louis and Mauritius andcan advise on car hire, excursions and hotels throughoutthe country.
DANGERS & ANNOYANCES
Port Louis is a city with a big underclass and
as such is not safe at night. After dark all
travellers should stick to well-lit main streetsand avoid Company Gardens, favoured hangout of pimps and drug dealers. If you don’tknow your exact route, take a taxi. Duringthe daytime it’s a very safe city but beware of pickpockets anywhere, although particularly in the market and around the bus stations.
SIGHTS & ACTIVITIES
Most of Port Louis’ sights are scattered aroundthe waterfront and southeast along PoudrièreSt and Intendance St. Although some, such asFort Adelaide, are slightly further out, the dis-tances are small and you can easily hop aroundthe shops, museums and the market in a day.
Central Market
Port Louis’ rightly famous
Central Market
 
(
h
5.30am-5.30pm Mon-Sat, 5.30am-11.30pm Sun)
, thecentre of the local economy since Victoriantimes, was cleaned up considerably in a 2004
renovation. Many comment that it’s lost much
of its dirty charm and atmosphere (you’refar less likely to see rats, although it’s still
quite possible!), but it’s still a good place toget a feel for the everyday life of many locals,
watch the hawkers at work and buy some
souvenirs. Most authentic are the wonderfulfruit and vegetable sections (including herbalmedicines and aphrodisiacs) and the meat,fish and seafood market.If you’re looking for souvenirs, a wide va-riety of Malagasy handicrafts are available,along with souvenir T-shirts of varying qual-ity. The level of hustling here can be tiresome,
however, and you’ll have to bargain hard; start
by slashing the price quoted by about 30%.
Blue Penny Museum
Whether or not you fully understand the
philatelic obsession with the Mauritian onepenny and two-pence stamps of 1847, the
Blue Penny Museum
 
(
%
210 8176; www.bluepenny
museum.com; Caudan Waterfront; adult/child/family Rs
150/80/350;
h
10am-5pm Mon-Sat)
is far more wide
ranging than its name suggests, taking in
the history of the island’s exploration, set-tlement and colonial period. It’s Port Louis’best museum, well lit and designed, with afantastic selection of maps, photographs andengravings from different periods in history,as well as a gallery for temporary exhibitionsand a good shop.
The pride of the museum’s collection istwo of the world’s rarest stamps: the red
one-penny and blue two-pence ‘Post Office’
stamps issued in 1847 (see the boxed text,
below ). To preserve the colours, they are only lit up for 10 minutes at a time: every hour,on the half-hour. They were purchased by agroup of Mauritian companies as a nationaltreasure and are probably the most valuableobjects on the entire island!
On the ground floor you’ll see the coun-
try’s most famous work of art: a superbly life-like statue by the Mauritian sculptor Prosperd’Épinay, carved in 1884. Based on Bernardin
de St-Pierre’s novel
Paul et Virginie
(see the
boxed text, p83), it shows the young hero car-rying his sweetheart across a raging torrent.
Natural History Museum
There’s only one real attraction at this small
but proud
museum
(
%
212 0639; Chaussée St; admission
free;
h
9am-4pm Mon, Tue, Thu & Fri, 9am-noon Sat)
andthat’s to see the famous – though somewhatgrubby – reconstruction of a dodo. Scottishscientists assembled the curious-looking birdin the late 19th century, using the only com-
plete dodo skeleton in existence (see p78).
The rest of the museum’s three halls get marks
for trying, but the majority of the other exhi-bits are a sad testimony to the fact that fishdon’t readily lend themselves to the process of taxidermy. Look out, however, for the stuffedbirds, including the solitaire and red rail, bothalso now extinct.
Chinatown
The Chinese have traditionally occupied a
quietly industrious position in the life of PortLouis. The region between the two ‘friendshipgates’ on Royal St forms the centre of PortLouis’ Chinatown. Here you’ll see the rich
STAMP OF APPROVAL
Philatelists (stamp collectors to the rest of us) go weak at the knees at the mention of theMauritian ‘Post Office’ one-penny and two-pence stamps. Issued in 1847, these stamps wereincorrectly printed with the words ‘Post Office’ rather than ‘Post Paid’. They were recalled upondiscovery of the error, but not before the wife of the British governor had mailed out a few dozenon invitations to one of her famous balls!These stamps now rank among the most valuable in the world. The ‘Bordeaux cover’, a letterbearing both stamps which was mailed to France, was last sold for a staggering US$3.8 million.In 1993 a consortium of Mauritian companies paid US$2.2 million for the pair of unused one-penny and two-pence stamps now on display in Port Louis’ Blue Penny Museum (above). This isthe only place in the world where the two can be seen together on public view.
56 57
 
      M     A     U     R     I     T     I     U     S
PORT LOUIS •• Port Louis
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 A   U R  I   T  I    U  S  
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PORT LOUIS •• Sights & Activities
mercantile life of the hard-working Chinese
community, the busy Chinese restaurants
and groceries and the streets echoing withthe unmistakable clatter of mah jong tiles.
Place S Bissoondoyal
Port Louis’ most imposing boulevard is
named after Sookdeo Bissoondoyal, a senior
Mauritian politician, independence leaderand, eventually, opposition leader againstRamgoolam, who died in 1977. The road
that bears his name is lined with royal palmsand leads up to
Government House
, a beautifulFrench colonial structure dating from 1738,
although it was added to later. Outside itstands a typically solemn statue of Queen
Victoria in full ‘we are not amused’ mode,while the statue of 
Mahé de Labourdonnais
atthe quayside end of the avenue is the best-loved in the city and has become its emblemthroughout Mauritius.
Photography Museum
This small but engaging
museum
 
(
%
211 1705;Old Council St; admission Rs 100;
h
10am-noon & 1-3.30pmMon-Fri)
, down a lane opposite the MunicipalTheatre, is the labour of love of local pho-tographer Tristan Bréville. He’s amassed a
treasure trove of old cameras and prints, in-cluding several daguerreotypes (the forerun-
ner of photographs) produced in Mauritius
in 1840, just a few months after the techniquewas discovered in France. The museum alsocontains a vast archive of historical photos of 
the island, only a tiny fraction of which are
on display.
 Jummah Mosque
The
 Jummah Mosque
 
(Royal St;
h
8am-noon & 2-4pmMon-Thu, Sat & Sun)
, the most important mosquein Mauritius, was built in the 1850s, and isa delightful blend of Indian, Creole and Is-
lamic architecture – it would look equally 
at home in Istanbul, Delhi or New Orleans!Visitors are welcome in the peaceful innercourtyard except on Fridays and during themonth of Ramadan.
Company Gardens
It’s a real pity that Company Gardens hassuch a sleazy atmosphere as it’s by far the
most attractive park in the city, with its vastbanyan trees, huge number of statues, quietbenches and fountains. During the day it’sperfectly safe (though keep your wits about
                    
To SSR MemorialCulture (100m); Shrine (2.5km)Père Laval'sCentre for To Le Pouce(4km)
CITE MARTIAL
Champ de MarsRacecourse
S   e  e  n  e  e  v  a  s  s  e  n   S   t  
I    n   k    e   r    m   a   n    S    t    
A  r  s  e  n  a  l    S   t  
   S  u  f  f  r  e  n    S   t
L  a   P   a  i   x   S   t   L  a  u  r  e  n  t   S   t  S   h  a  k  e  s   p  e  a  r  e   S   t  
   D   '   E  s   t  a   i  n  g     S   t
 G   o  n  i   n   S   t  
32372735
 
45464749505148SLEEPINGEATING53545657555859606263646561DRINKINGENTERTAINMENT6667686970717372SHOPPINGTRANSPORT7452
D3D3A3A3A4B3B5
Bourbon Tourist Hotel....................Hotel Le Grand Carnot...................Labourdonnais Waterfront Hotel....Le St Georges Hotel........................Le Suffren Hotel & Marina.............Tandoori Hotel...............................Black Steer......................................
C4C4C4C4C3C5A3B3B3B5B4A3C4
Dahl Puri Stall................................Debonairs Pizza..............................First Restaurant..............................La Bonne Marmite.........................La Flore Mauricienne......................La Rose des Vents........................(see 47)Le Calife.........................................Le Capitaine...................................L'Escale........................................(see 47)Mystic Masala................................Namaste.......................................(see 59)Restaurant du Vieux Conseil..........Tandoori Express............................The Courtyard................................Winner's Supermarket....................Beer & Spice.................................(see 62)
Keg & Marlin................................(see 51)
Latitiude 20..................................(see 47)Sunset Café....................................
B3A3A3B3B4B4B4C3
Cinemaxx.....................................(see 51)Keg & Marlin...............................(see 51)Municipal Theatre........................(see 39)Port Louis Casino...........................Star Cinema...................................Central Market.............................(see 26)Craft Market..................................MAST..........................................(see 68)Power Music................................(see 68)Air Austral......................................(see 1)Air France......................................(see 1)Air Madagascar..............................Air Mauritius..................................Air Seychelles.................................(see 1)British Airways..............................(see 69)Emirates.........................................Immigration Square Bus Station......Singapore Airlines...........................South African Airways (SAA)..........(see 1)
A4
Victoria Square Bus Station............
C4
Bombay Sweets Mart.....................
1FE23456
0.2 miles400 m00
                
To Réunion (220km);Rodrigues (600km); Madagascar (800km) Moka (10km)Pailles (5km);Domaine LesTo Avis (500m);Ferry Terminal (1km);To Coraline Shipping Agency (500m);Grand Baie (25km)Pamplemousses (11km);
FANFARONTROULECAUDAN
ChinatownWaterfront Port LouisWaterfront Caudan
M2
  D  r   E  d  o  u  a  r  d
  L  a  u  r e  n  t   S  t
R   i   v  i   è  r  e   S   t  E   m  m  a  n  u  e  l    A  n  q  u  e  t  i   l    S   t  P   a  s  t  e  u  r   S   t  
   F  a  r  q   u   h  a  r    S   t
 J   u  m  m  a  h   M  o  s  q  u  e   S   t  E   u   g  è  n  e   
   D  a  u  p   h   i  n  e    S   t   L   '   H  o  m  m  e    S   t   R  é  m  y   O   l   l   i  e  r    S   t  Q   u  e  e  n    S   t
B  o  u  r  b  o  n   S   t  
   S   t
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  C  o  u  n  c   i   l
P   o   u  d    r   i   è   r   e   S   t   
  S   i  r    V   i  r g    i   l   N  a  z   S  t
C   h  u  r  c  h   S   t  C   o  r  d   e  r  i   e   S   t  S   t   D  e  n  i   s   S   t  V   i   s  h  n  u   K   c  h  e  t  r  a   S   t  
F   r  è  r  e   F   e  l   i   x   d   e   V   a  l   o  i   s   S   t  
   L   i  s   l  e   t   G  e  o  f  f  r  e  y    S   t
M  o  n  s  e  i    g  n  e  u  r   
   P  r  e  s    J  o    h  n    K  e  n  n  e  d   y   S   t
  e  f   i   l   l  e    S   t
 M a  l  l
S   i   r   C    A  n  t  e  l   m  e   S   t  
  C   h  e  v  r  e  a  u    S   t
   B  a  r  r  a  c    k  s    S   t
   B  r  o  w  n    S  e  q   u  a  r  d
t   S  t  
 J       e     m     m     a        p     e     s      S       t       
S   t   L  o  u  i   s   S   t  
D  r   R  o  u   g  e  t   S   t  
S   t   G   e  o  r   g  e  s   S   t  
   D  e   C  o  u  r  c  y    S   t
V   o  l   c   y   P   o  u   g  n  e  t   S   t  
 O r l e a n s  S t
  M   è  r  e    B  a  r   t   h  e   l  e  m  y    S   t
R   a  o  u  l    R   i   v  e  t   S   t  
D       e     s     c     h       a     r      t       r      e     s     S       t       
E   d   i   t  h   C   a  v  e  l   l    S   t  S   i   r   W   i   l   l   i   a  m   N   e  w  t  o  n   S   t  
   R  o  y  a   l    S   t
 J   u  l   e  s   K   o  e  n  i    g   S   t  
   S   i  r    S  e  e  w  o  o  s  a  g   u  r    R  a  m  g   o  o   l  a  m    S   t   L  a   b  o  u  r  d  o  n  n  a   i  s    S   t
P   o   p  e   H   e  n  n  e  s  s   y   S   t  
 C  h a u s s é e   S  t
 L o r d  K i t c h e n e r  S t
M   o   n  s  e  i    g   n  e  u  r    L  e  e  n   A   v   e  
I  n  t  e  n  d   a  n  c  e  
Immigration Square
P   l   a  c  e   S   B  i   s  s  o  o  n  d   o   y  a  l   
 SquareVictoria
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28302933323635343115171620192322211812548763INFORMATION393842414044432527261013121114SIGHTS & ACTIVITIES37249
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Mahé de Labourdonnais Statue........King Edward VII Statue.....................Jummah Mosque.............................Government House..........................Fort Adelaide....................................Company Gardens...........................City Hall...........................................Chinatown.......................................Paix..............................................
Chapel & Shrine of Marie Reine de laB4C3B4D5B6B4B3C5
Dr Jeetoo Hospital..............................Cyber Café.........................................Central Post Office.............................Cellplus..............................................Canadian Embassy.............................
British High Commission.....................
Bookcourt......................................(see 68)Barclays Bank.....................................Australian High Commission...............State Bank of Mauritius....................
Smart Net Café.................................
Seychelles Consulate........................Registrar of Civil Status....................Police Headquarters.........................Passport & Immigration Office.........Medical Trading Pharmacy...............MCB................................................(MTPA)........................................
Mauritius Tourism Promotion AuthorityC4C4C4C4C3D5D5A3E6C3
St Louis Cathedral............................St James Cathedral...........................Place S Bissoondoyal........................
Photography Museum......................
Natural History Museum..................Municipal Theatre............................Mauritius Postal Museum.................
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Librairie du Trèfle.............................Librairie Allot Ltd..............................HSBC...............................................German Embassy.............................French Embassy................................Emtel..............................................(see 70)Champ de Mars Racecourse.............Central Market.................................Blue Penny Museum........................Zenith Internet Café.......................(see 62)US Embassy......................................(see 1)Malartic Tomb..................................
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Swiss Consulate...............................
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Editions de l'Ocean Indien..................
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CDB1A23456
PORT LOUIS
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