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Dec Safety Topics

Dec Safety Topics

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Published by: justinrobinson3 on Dec 03, 2012
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Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________ Date_________________
Prepared by:Justin Robinson Toolboxtopics.com 
Topic #7
COLD WEATHER SAFETY
Summer and fall are gone and the winter months are upon us. Even though it's cold outside we still haveto work and get the job done. There are several things we can do to keep warm and prevent cold weatherrelated accidents.The first thing we want to do is to keep our body temperature at or about normal, 98.6F. This can beaccomplished by wearing layers of clothing both inside and outdoors. Wear cotton or lightweight woolnext to the skin and wool layers over your underwear. Keep dry by having proper rain gear available and apair of good, waterproof boots. An extra pair of clean, dry socks can really come in handy. Don't forget toprotect your neck and ears; you can lose a lot of heat from these two areas, and a good pair of gloves isessential.Do you know the signs of frostbite? our skin will become white and you won't have much circulation. Inthe worst case, blisters will form but you won't feel any pain. First aid for frostbite is as follows: NEVERrub the frozen part of the body with snow -- Add extra clothing or use a blanket to cover the frozen area --get out of the cold and into a warm location -- the frozen area may be immersed in warm water butNEVER use hot water -- if the condition does not improve seek professional medical attention.Another area of concern during cold weather is the use of portable heaters. If they are not maintainedproperly they can cause accidents. Carbon monoxide can result from defective ventilating and fromincomplete fuel burn. All portable heaters should be checked by a competent person before being put intouse. Locate fuel containers, regulators, piping and hose where they will not be subject to damage. LP gascontainers not in use should be stored upright, in a specified outside location and protected againstdamage. Containers in use must be kept in an upright position and secured. Always be sure to protect thevalves from physical damage.Cold weather is here to stay for a few months -- keep your guard up against cold weather injury.
ALL LIQUID CONTAINERS MUST BE PROPERLY LABELED AS TO CONTENTS. LABELSSHOULD BE EASY TO READ AND CONTAINERS STORED CORRECTLY
.
 
 
Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________ Date_________________
Prepared by:Justin Robinson Toolboxtopics.com 
Topic #9
DON'T NEGLECT CUTS
Infection is often called 'Blood Poisoning'. It might be of interest to know exactly what is meant by 'BloodPoisoning'. The term itself indicates that it is a poisoning directly related to blood.There are two ways in which a poison can attack our bodies. It may be taken in through the mouth andenter the body by way of the digestive organs, or it may enter directly into the blood stream through anabrasion or cut in the skin. In any event, every poison eventually works through the blood and the poisonof infections works into the blood stream directly.The smallest cut, abrasion or scratch is large enough for germs to enter. If they are not wash off they willcause an infection which could lead to blood poisoning. If left untreated, a hand or arm could become soinfected that it might possibly have to be amputated.Should you find yourself with a small scratch or cut be sure to get it washed out and properly coveredwith a clean bandage. 'An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure'. Serious cuts and lacerations needto be treated by professional medical personnel.Most often you'll run up against smaller injuries - burns, nicks, scratches and cuts. The danger here is thatmost workers don't bother to get first aid for these minor injuries. The bottom line is - DON'T NEGLECTCUTS. Do your part by trying to prevent them from happening in the first place, but when any injuryoccurs - serious or minor - be sure that it receives the right kind of treatment, as quickly as possible.First aid kits must be checked, frequently to be sure they are clean and fully stocked. This applies to yourhome and car or boat as well as on the job.
KEEP MINOR INJURIES MINOR! FIRST AID TREATMENT IS IMPORTANT TO PREVENTINFECTION.
 
Safety Meeting
Given By_____________________ Date_________________
Prepared by:Justin Robinson Toolboxtopics.com 
Topic #10
DRESS FOR THE JOB
Our clothes and footwear are our first line of defense when it comes to protecting our bodies. Each day wewear our work clothes for eight, ten and sometimes even more hours, and there is nothing worse thanworking in uncomfortable clothing and/or poor fitting footwear. Although your work clothes are veryimportant to your safety and health, your comfort is also a consideration. You need to have clothes thatare right for the job. They must be sturdy and durable, and capable of standing up to heavy wear and tear.You need clothes that will
 
keep you warm in winter and cool in the summer, and that will keep you dry inwet and inclement weather. We all know that it's easier to take off a layer of clothing than not haveenough on in cold weather. Wool works best in the cold while cotton is superior during the warm months.In other words, wear clothes that you can work in comfortably and that are designed for the kind of work you do and the weather in which you must do it.Proper footwear is another important part of construction attire. Wear the right shoe or boot for the job. Agood sturdy leather boot will last a long time and also provide your feet with good support throughout theshift. Since you are on your feet most of the time, make sure the shoe or boot fits correctly. Tennis shoeshave no place on a construction site -- one reason is that protruding nails and tennis shoe soles just don'tmix.If you wear jewelry, watches or rings remember that they can be very dangerous around machinery andelectricity. Take them off and put them in your pocket, or better yet, just leave them at home! Many aconstruction worker has lost a finger or two from wearing rings on the job. Use common sense and dressfor the job you do -- leave jewelry at home, wear appropriate clothing and sturdy footwear, and yourworkday will be a safer and more comfortable one.
SET A GOOD EXAMPLE FOR OTHERS AND TREAT SAFETY AS ONE OF YOUR MOSTIMPORTANT JOB RESPONSIBILITIES.

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