Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
5Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Hagakure - Yamamoto Tsunetomo

Hagakure - Yamamoto Tsunetomo

Ratings: (0)|Views: 34|Likes:
Published by dragosandriana
The Hagakure was written approximately one hundred years after the start of the Tokugawa era, a time of relative peace. With no major campaigns to fight, the samurai were transforming from a warrior to an administrative class. His work represents one approach to the problem of maintaining military preparedness and a proper military mindset in a time when neither has much practical application.
Hagakure (Kyūjitai: 葉隱; Shinjitai: 葉隠; meaning Hidden by the Leaves or hidden leaves),[1] or Hagakure Kikigaki (葉隠聞書?) is a practical and spiritual guide for a warrior, drawn from a collection of commentaries by the samurai Yamamoto Tsunetomo, former retainer to Nabeshima Mitsushige, the third ruler of what is now Saga prefecture in Japan. Tsuramoto Tashiro compiled these commentaries from his conversations with Tsunetomo from 1709 to 1716; however, it was not published until many years afterwards. Hagakure is also known as The Book of the Samurai, Analects of Nabeshima or Hagakure Analects.
The Hagakure was written approximately one hundred years after the start of the Tokugawa era, a time of relative peace. With no major campaigns to fight, the samurai were transforming from a warrior to an administrative class. His work represents one approach to the problem of maintaining military preparedness and a proper military mindset in a time when neither has much practical application.
Hagakure (Kyūjitai: 葉隱; Shinjitai: 葉隠; meaning Hidden by the Leaves or hidden leaves),[1] or Hagakure Kikigaki (葉隠聞書?) is a practical and spiritual guide for a warrior, drawn from a collection of commentaries by the samurai Yamamoto Tsunetomo, former retainer to Nabeshima Mitsushige, the third ruler of what is now Saga prefecture in Japan. Tsuramoto Tashiro compiled these commentaries from his conversations with Tsunetomo from 1709 to 1716; however, it was not published until many years afterwards. Hagakure is also known as The Book of the Samurai, Analects of Nabeshima or Hagakure Analects.

More info:

Published by: dragosandriana on Dec 04, 2012
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/10/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
HagakureThe Book of the Samurai
 Yamamoto Tsunetomo
(Translation By William Scott Wilson)
A n d r e w R. P o r tMassachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Urban Studies & Planning22 Columbia Street, Apt. # 2Cambridge, MA 02139 USAPhone (617) 876-2372Email port@mit.edu Web http://web.mit.edu/port/www/
 
2
Hagakure: The Book of the Samuari
 Yamamoto Tsunemoto
Contents
@ I
NTRODUCTION
 I. C
HAPTER 
O
NE
 II. C
HAPTER 
 T
 WO
 
III. C
HAPTER 
 T
HREE
 IV. C
HAPTER 
F
OUR 
  V. C
HAPTER 
F
IVE
(N
O
 T
EXT
E
XISTS
)
 
 VI. C
HAPTER 
S
IX
  VII. C
HAPTER 
S
EVEN
  VIII. C
HAPTER 
E
IGHT
 IX. C
HAPTER 
N
INE
 X. C
HAPTER 
 T
EN
 XI. C
HAPTER 
E
LEVEN
 XII. L
 ATE
N
IGHT
I
DLE
 T
 ALK 
 
 
3
Introduction
Hagakure is the essential book of the Samurai. Written by Yamamoto Tsunetomo, who was aSamurai in the early 1700s, it is a book that combines the teachings of both Zen and Confucianism. These philosophies are centered on loyalty, devotion, purity and selflessness, and Yamamoto placesa strong emphasis on the notion of living in the present moment with a strong and clear mind. The Samurai were knights who defended and fought for their lords at a time when useful farming land was scarce and in need of protection. They believed in duty, and gave themselves completely to their masters. The Samurai believed that only after transcending all fear could they obtain peaceof mind and yield the power to serve their masters faithfully and loyally even in the face of death. The word Hagakure literally translates as hidden beneath the leaves and also fallen leaves. Perhapsit was named this because at the time that it was written, the way of the samurai was becoming obsolete. The Hagakure has been rewritten in modern terms by one of Japan’s famous writers, YukioMishima. His own views were very similar to those of Yamamoto, particularly the philosophy of cultivating the self. His characters all had self sufficiency in common, and did not rely uponanyone else for completion. Although the Hagakure was written centuries ago for a breed of warriors that no longer exist, thephilosophies and wisdom within are still practical, even in our modern times.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->