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12.5.12

12.5.12

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By Madison Roberts and MelissaBrown
CW Staff
A 28-year-old University of labama doctoral student iseing held on $500,000 bondafter sending threatening mes-sages to staff members, MediaRelations Director CathyAndreen said Tuesday.According to the TuscaloosaCounty Sheriff’s Office web-site, Zachary Burell is chargedwith one count of making ter-rorist threats and one countof first-degree stalking. TheTCSO’s website refers to Burellas ‘Zachary Burrell.’Burell, a doctoral candidatein theoretical physics, accord-ing to his academic web pagehosted on the University’sdomain, was suspended foralleged violations of theStudent Code of Conduct inlate October 2012, Andreensaid.According to a depositionfiled in Tuscaloosa CountyDistrict Court, Burell thenbegan sending emails thatincluded movie clips suggest-ing violence toward Universityofficials.“He was also issued ano-trespass order prohibit-ing him from being on cam-pus,” Andreen said of thetime period between Burell’ssuspension and arrest. “Theemails did not contain directthreats to the general campuspopulation.”Andreen would not com-ment on what alleged UA viola-tions Burell committed.“Judicial Affairs recordsare covered by federal pri-vacy laws, and we cannot pro-vide any more information,”she said.Sophomore Andrew Sbrissa,who met Burell at BryantDining Hall last school year,said he became friends withBurell and would see himaround campus. Sbrissa calledBurell an “incredibly smartguy.”
Wednesday, December 5, 2012 Serving the University of Alabama since 1894 Vol. 119, Issue 66
 
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Briefs ........................2Opinions ...................4Culture ......................7
 WEATHER
 
today
INSIDE
 
today’s  paper 
Sports ..................... 11Puzzles ....................13Classifieds .............. 13
Chance ofthunderstorms
72º/52º
Thursday 73º/54º
Partly cloudy
 
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CULTURE
PAGE 9Thursday Art Night to featuretwo on campus galleries.
CW ONLINE
NEWS
| ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
No. 1 gymnasticsteam to face onlytop 25 opponents
CW Staff 
The two-time defendingCAA Champion Alabamaymnastics team is rankedo. 1 in the newly releasedreseason national coach-s’ poll. The Crimson Tideas ranked second in thereseason poll the last twoears.The preseason top 25also includes all nine of labama’s 2013 opponents,ncluding the remaininghree of the top four, withCLA at No. 2, Florida at No.and Oklahoma at No. 4. TheGators and Bruins, who fin-shed second and third lasteason, respectively, in theightest championship finishn gymnastics history, areeparated by a single pointn the preseason poll. Utahounds out the top five.“I had the same four teamsat the top on my ballot,” UAead coach Sarah Pattersonaid, “although I had Floridaat No. 1, and I feel they arehe most talented team in theountry and have been forhe last several years.”The Tide will face No. 8SU twice this season andill take on No. 11 Georgiaand No. 12 Arkansas on theroad. Alabama will alsoface off with No. 13 Auburnat midseason and will openon the road with No. 21Missouri. This year’s Powerof Pink meet will see the Tidetake on No. 25 Kentucky inColeman Coliseum.“The addition of Missourito the SoutheasternConference this season doesnothing but strengthen thenation’s premiere gymnas-tics conference,” Pattersonsaid. “All eight of our schoolsare in the top 25, with sevenin the top 15 and two in thetop three.”Season tickets are on salenow through the AlabamaTicket Office in the lobby of Coleman Coliseum, by call-ing 205-348-2262 or online atRollTide.com.“Our home schedule isincredible and will show-case college gymnastics atits best,” Patterson said. “Wewelcome three teams thatare in the top 10 to ColemanColiseum, while all five of ourhome opponents are in thetop 25. Overall, our scheduleis probably the toughest inthe nation, but one that I feelwill give us the experiencenecessary to be on the floorthe last night of the seasonwith a chance to win anotherchampionship.”
Doctoral student charged with terrorist threats
Zachary Burellsuspended from UA
SEE
ARREST
PAGE 2
NEWS
 
| STUDENT ARREST
SPORTS
 
| GYMNASTICS
Alabama edges outFlorida for top spot
Foundational work on new student recreation center now underway
By Chandler Wright 
Staff Reporter
The University of Alabamahas already begun foundationalwork on a new 114,000-square-foot recreational facility moreeasily accessible to studentsliving in dorms on the northend of campus.“The nature of the facility,within easy walking distanceof over 5,500 students who willreside on the north end of cam-pus, makes this facility unique-ly accessible and functional,”George Brown, executive direc-tor of University Recreation,said. “Additionally, the larger,more convenient access todining options that will be pres-ent within this facility affordsstudents a true one-stop,healthy approach to wellness.”Brown said the new center,called the Student Center, willexpand on many features cur-rently offered at the UniversityRecreation Center, includingan enhanced climbing area anddesignated rink area for floorhockey and other sports. Thecenter will also feature threerecreation courts and addition-al space for group training andclub sports.“Dedicated group exercise,group cycling and personaltraining rooms will be avail-able,” he said. “A large openarea below the main level willallow for many small grouptraining and club sport-relat-ed play and will greatly assistthese clubs that have formallyfound space to practice andplay in the current studentRecreation Center very diffi-cult to attain.”Dan Wolfe, the campus mas-ter planner, said the Universityworked closely with Brown andhis staff at the Rec Center whileplanning what features shouldbe offered in the StudentCenter.“From a planning stand-point, we have worked veryclosely with George Brown andall the folks at the RecreationCenter during the master plan-ning process,” Wolfe said. “Oneof the many conversations wehave had with them is shouldthe rapid growth in use of the recreational facilities beaccommodated by expandingthe existing recreational centeror by creating more regionalcenters around campus.”Although students providedinput, Brown said it was hardto have conversations withstudents about a facility thatwasn’t projected to be com-pleted until 2014, so he alsoreached out to the staff of thecurrent Recreation Center.“It was hard to talk to a con-sistent audience, because thestudent body changes overevery four years. We talkedto students, but we also lookat data and usage of the cur-rent facility, what was popular,etc,” Brown said. “This dic-tated many design decisions.We also met with our staff andposed questions like: what arethe pinch points? Where arewe growing? So, we did a lotof trend analysis to determinewhat was popular and whatwasn’t.”
NEWS
 
| CAMPUS GROWTH
New Student Centerset to open in 2014
SEE
REC CENTER
PAGE 2
University of Alabama Student Recreation Center
 An artist’s rendering of the new Student Center, to be located betweenthe two Presidential Village buildings on the north side of campus.By Tori Linville
Contributing Writer
“Dead Week” took on a whole newmeaning Tuesday.Spawned from English profes-sor Patti White’s Apocalypse inLiterature class, students with bloodymakeup and torn clothes slouchedtheir way to the library from four dif-ferent directions on the Quad to lis-ten to a zombie manifesto and declaretheir rights as law-abiding zombies.As a class assignment, Whiterequired each student to participatein the walk.“Zombies are an important part of popular culture right now, appearingin all sorts of venues – from politicaladvertising to the Centers for DiseaseControl and Prevention website tocharity marathons,” White said.“This makes sense to me, becausezombies serve as a sort of generalizedform of the Other, the embodiment of our deepest fears, whether those beof scarcity of resources, the threat of an outbreak or invasion or the dead-ening of our humanity. Zombies helpus negotiate our concerns.”
English students marchfor ‘zombie bill of rights’
The walking dead week
CW | Caitlin Trotter
Students in English professor Patti White’s Apocalypse in Literature class march near Gorgas Library dressed as zombies,advocating a “zombie bill of rights.”
SEE
ZOMBIE
PAGE 13
We talked to students, but wealso look at data and usageof the current facility, what was popular, etc. This dic-tated many design decisions.
— George Brown
 
ONLINEON THE CALENDA
Submit your events tocalendar@cw.ua.edu
 
LUNCH
Baked HamChicken & Pesto LavashPork Lo MeinYams Baked in Cider withCurrentsGrilled Vegetable PizzaCream of Broccoli SoupPolenta Pizza (Vegetarian)
FRESH FOOD
LUNCH
Pot Roast & GravyBali Chicken Lettuce WrapsGrilled Italian ChickenSandwichGrilled Chicken Fajita PizzaRoasted PotatoesCarrotsFresh Collards (Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Chicken Breast FrittersSeafood SaladHamburgerTaco PizzaMashed PotatoesCornCream of Mushroom Soup(Vegetarian)
ON THE MENU
LAKESIDEFRIDAY 
 What:
Xpress night featuringBama Buddies
 Where:
Ferguson CenterStarbucks
 When:
6 – 9 p.m.
 What:
French Film Series“Bienvenue Chez Les Ch’tis”
 Where:
French House
 When:
7 – 9 p.m.
 What:
Career Center
 Where:
HCA Office
 When:
9:30 – 11:30 a.m.
TODAY 
What:
Men’s Basketball v.Dayton
Where:
Coleman Coliseum
When:
8 p.m.
What:
Price of ComedyOpen Mic
Where:
Green Bar
When:
7 p.m.
What:
Brown Bag LectureSeries
Where:
360 FergusonStudent Center
When:
Noon – 1 p.m.
SATURDAY 
What:
Alabama ChoirSchool
Where:
Moody Concert Hall
When:
7 p.m.
What: ‘
A Christmas Carol’
Where:
The Bama Theatre
When:
7 p.m.
What: ‘
All in the Timing’
Where:
Allen Bales Theatre
When:
8 p.m.
ON THE RADAR 
GO
GO
Page 2• Wednesday,December 5, 2012
 
   O   N    T   H   E
 
The Crimson White is the communitynewspaper of The University of Alabama.The Crimson White is an editorially freenewspaper produced by students.The University of Alabama cannot influ-ence editorial decisions and editorialopinions are those of the editorial boardand do not represent the official opinionsof the University.Advertising offices of The Crimson Whiteare on the first floor, Student PublicationsBuilding, 923 University Blvd. The adver-tising mailing address is P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White (USPS 138020) ispublished four times weekly when classesare in session during Fall and SpringSemester except for the Monday afterSpring Break and the Monday afterThanksgiving, and once a week whenschool is in session for the summer. Markedcalendar provided.The Crimson White is provided forfree up to three issues. Any other papersare $1.00. The subscription rate for TheCrimson White is $125 per year. Checksshould be made payable to The Universityof Alabama and sent to: The CrimsonWhite Subscription Department, P.O. Box2389, Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.The Crimson White is entered as peri-odical postage at Tuscaloosa, AL 35401.POSTMASTER: Send address changesto The Crimson White, P.O. Box 2389,Tuscaloosa, AL 35403-2389.All material contained herein, exceptadvertising or where indicated oth-erwise, is Copyright © 2012 by TheCrimson White and protected under the“Work Made for Hire” and “PeriodicalPublication” categories of the U.S. copy-right laws.Material herein may not be reprintedwithout the expressed, written permissionof The Crimson White.
P.O. Box 870170 Tuscaloosa, AL 35487Newsroom: 348-6144 | Fax: 348-8036Advertising: 348-7845Classifieds: 348-7355
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editor-in-chiefeditor@cw.ua.edu
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managing editor
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news editornewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
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FOLLOW US ONTWITTER@THECRIMSONWHITE VISIT US ONLINE ATCW.UA.EDU
 
LUNCH
SteaksChicken BurritoSautéed MushroomsBaked Potato BarSteamed Green BeansCheesy LasagnaLentil & Vegetable Soup(Vegetarian)
 
DINNER
Meatloaf Sausage & MushroomCavatappiCrispy Chicken TendersFrench FriesGlazed CarrotsHome-style Mashed PotatoesSteamed Green Peas(Vegetarian)
BURKE
“He was always fairly talk-ative with me and the friendsI’d be with, but I could tell hewas a reserved person and fair-ly quiet,” Sbrissa said. “It wasalso evident that he was a veryfocused student and alwayswanted to share his passion forphysics.”According to Burell’s aca-demic web page and LinkedInaccount, he graduated with aBachelor of Science in phys-ics from AuburnUniversity in2007 beforeobtaining aMaster’s of Science in thesame field fromAlabama in 2011.He graduatedfrom Locust ForkHigh School,located about30 miles northof Birmingham,Ala., in 1998.In additionto working as aresearch assis-tant at the Oak Ridge NationalLaboratory, the Space ResearchInstitute and Alabama’s Centerfor Materials for InformationTechnology in the last sixyears, Burell works as a gradu-ate teaching assistant at theUniversity.His LinkedIn page lists teach-ing experience in EngineeringPhysics I, Engineering PhysicsII, Astronomy Lab and CollegePhysics II.On ratemyprofessors.com, awebsite commonly used by col-lege students to provide publicfeedback on classes or profes-sors they’ve had, Burell has a3.8 out of 5 overall quality rat-ing.In a comment dated from2009, an Astronomy 102 stu-dent rated Burell as ‘AverageQuality.’“Zac [sic] is apretty cool guy,”the commenterwrote. “If youdon’t under-stand, just ask…and tell him toslow down. Heknows what heis talking about,he just doesn’treally know howto say it.”Sbrissa saidhe didn’t knowof Burell beingarrested untilThe CrimsonWhite approached him forcomment Tuesday but was sur-prised by the news.“He had mentioned thateven as a graduate studenthere at UA, he had been bulliedbefore,” Sbrissa said. “I want-ed to get to know him moreso that he’d have someone totalk to and someone to just callhis friend.”
ARREST
FROM PAGE 1
Physics student Zachary Burell arrested forterrorist threats against UA administrators
Brown said enrollmentgrowth and campus expansionled the administration to enterinto conversations about build-ing a second recreation centerfor students on campus.“When webecame aware of the dorms addi-tions towardsthe north end of campus, I think[former UAPresident] Wittwas concernedsomewhat anec-dotally aboutthe growthof campusand how thataffects our rec-reational facilities,” Brownsaid. “As he became aware of this, they were also movingforward with the demolitionof Rose Towers and the build-ing of the new dorms. To myunderstanding, they knewcampus was continuing togrow, and I think they knew arelocation to offset some of thecongestion at the current RecCenter was a good idea.”Wolfe said the StudentCenter will not only addresscampus growth and expan-sion, but also bemore accessibleto students onthe north end of campus.“We alsobelieve thataddressinggrowth throughregional satel-lite facilities isa good conceptthat will makeaccess for usersmore convenientand increase usage,” Wolfesaid. “This concept is goodfor campus planning as well,because it reduces the needfor additional parking at themain complex and allows forwalkable access to about 5,000students who live in the northarea of campus.”
REC CENTER
FROM PAGE 1
New Student Center slated for completionin 2014; UA planned for student body growth
Shark being tracked off North Carolina shore capitvates fans
We also believe that address-ing growth through regionalsatellite facilities is a goodconcept that will make accessfor users more convenientand increase usage.
— Dan Wolfe
He had mentioned that evenas a graduate student hereat UA, he had been bulliedbefore. I wanted to get toknow him more so that he’dhave someone to talk toand someone to just call hisfriend.
— Andrew Sbrissa
MCT Campus
RALEIGH, N.C. — If not forthe GPS device, no one wouldknow she’s here.A great white shark affec-tionately dubbed Mary Lee byscientists and adopted by thou-sands of online fans has beenusing the waters off NorthCarolina’s coast as a privateall-you-can-eat buffet.There’s no way of telling if many boaters or tourists havecrossed currents with thecelebrity shark that’s as largeand as heavy as a family sedan.Mary Lee’s admirers are fol-lowing her movements at a safedistance – by laptop, iPad andat the office.Mary Lee is being trackedby a GPS-type device that pro-vides real-time data as to herwhereabouts. Dozens of greatwhites have been tracked thisway, but none in the Atlantic,where they are rare, and theirsub-aquatic habits are shroud-ed in mystery.Each time the shark’s finbreaks the surface of theAtlantic Ocean, the $1,000device bolted to its fin signalsa satellite, and the shark’sposition appears on an onlinemap. Some sharks rarely sur-face, but Mary Lee has comeup more than 100 times, some-times multiple times a day.The string of dots she hasleft resembles a hurricanetracker, showing inexplicablestops, reversals, loops andsudden bursts.Last ping: Tuesday at 9:08a.m. EST, showing Mary Leein a holding pattern – or is it afeeding frenzy? – just south of Myrtle Beach, S.C.Since having her dorsalfin tagged in mid-Septem-ber by scientists in CapeCod, Mary Lee has cruisedbetween Wilmington, N.C., andJacksonville, Fla., throughoutOctober and November. Shehas hugged the shore in MyrtleBeach, paid her respects toCape Fear, and slipped in andout of inlets at Bald HeadIsland.“This is the real-life Jaws,bro,” said Chris Fischer, proj-ect manager at OCEARCH,the scientific organization thattagged the fish. “I believe thatMary Lee is the most legendaryfish caught in history.”Shark aficionados grindtheir mandibles at the mentionof the bestselling book andblockbuster movie that por-trayed their beloved sharks aspredatory monsters and man-eaters. Fischer and his col-leagues are tracking Mary Leeto learn where great whitesbreed and give birth so thatshe and her watery kin can beprotected.A threat to humans? Mostlyhype, Fischer said. Greatwhites don’t attack people –except when mistaking themfor seals or other prey.Nothing pleases Fischermore than the viral crazeand resulting news attentionshowered on Mary Lee. TheOCEARCH site has been over-whelmed by as many as 2,000unique visitors in one hour and75,000 last week.Among the engrossed is JoO’Keefe of Carolina Shores,N.C., a marine life enthusiast,who checks in on Mary Leeat least three times a day andpromptly updates friends andreporters on Mary Lee’s status.“They are thrilled to hearabout Mary Lee becauseshe’s massive,” O’Keefe said.“I wanted the public every-where she went to share theexcitement of a macrocosmicexperience.”Great whites are presumedto follow two-year migratoryloops, traveling thousands of miles, Fischer said, but almostnothing is known about theseapex predators that rule thewaterways.It’s also assumed that MaryLee is a habitue of the EastCoast, not an interloper fromanother part of the globe, butnothing is certain.“How big is their world?What does their neighborhoodlook like?” said Greg Skomal,a leading shark author-ity and senior scientist at theMassachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries. “In essencewe’re studying their life his-tory.”The tracking device has a lifeexpectancy of five years, plentyof time for Mary Lee to give aguided tour of her domain.“We’ve known there’s theseplaces in the world where whitesharks show up and people seethem,” Fischer said. “But theyhave no idea where they camefrom, what they’re doing, orwhere they go to when they’renot there.”Fischer and his crew canhaul a mature shark aboardtheir floating laboratory, takeblood samples, tissue samplesand bacteria scrapings, all thewhile calming the giant fishby covering its eyes with a wetcloth and running a water hoseinto its mouth.
WikiMedia Commons
 
By Mark Hammontree
Contributing Writer
There is still time and spaceto enroll in a class for theWinter Interim for those stu-dents interested in gettingahead, making up for lost cred-its or simply making the mostout of their winter break.The Winter Interim is acondensed three-week semes-ter new to The University of Alabama this year. There areten courses being offered atboth the undergraduate andgraduate level, set to begin onMonday, Dec. 17, a few daysafter the last Fall finals havebeen turned in.Denzel Evans-Bell, the SGAvice president of StudentAffairs who worked with theUniversity’s Academic Affairsoffice to implement the pro-gram, said the classes are about80 percent full currently.“I believe this term is going
By Rich Robinson
Assistant News Editor
An initiative headed up bya handful of student groupsis looking to put more womeninto leadership positions oncampus.Elect Her is a joint effort of the Women’s Resource Center,Student Leadership Counciland the American Associationof University Women. The pro-gram is currently acceptingnominations for its day-longtraining session on Feb. 2. Fiftystudents will be able to registerand participate.Tiara Dees is the commu-nications coordinator for theWomen’s Resource Center andsupports participation in theprogram.“Elect Her is a very uniqueopportunity, as this workshoptrains UA undergraduate stu-dents in the skills they needto run for elected offices suchas the Student GovernmentAssociation and/or pursueother leadership-oriented posi-tions,” Dees said. “The WRC iscurrently looking for organiza-tions, faculty and staff mem-bers to nominate students forElect Her.”Jessi Hitchins, the assis-tant director of the Women’sResource Center, said studentsat the workshop learn how tocreate campaign messages andcommunicate them effectively,as well as how to reach out andmobilize voters on campus.“Research has shown thatwomen who run for studentbody elections in college aremore likely to run for officeas adults,” Hitchins said.“Additionally, AAUW reportsthat women need to be encour-aged, on average, at least threetimes to run for an office,while most men do not requireany intervention. The train-ing addresses the disparitybetween the high percentage of women in colleges and univer-sities and their low percentagein student governments.”According to a report bythe American Association of University Women, womenhold just 17 percent of the seatsin the U.S. Congress and 24percent of the seats in state leg-islatures. On the college level,women make up approximately52 percent of all student govern-ment representatives, but only43 percent of student govern-ment president spots, accord-ing to data collected by theAmerican Student GovernmentAssociation.This trend also takes placeat the Capstone. Out of theseven executive council mem-bers of the UA SGA, only one,Executive Secretary BrielleAppelbaum, is female.“Pinning an exact reason asto why more women do not runfor executive offices is difficult.Regardless of location, womenare drastically underrepresent-ed in elected office in this coun-try, which is why Elect Her wasborn,” Zoe Storey, the studentliaison for Elect Her, said. “Toblame any one source as far aswhy women have not run is toignore larger gender issues atplay.”Storey went on to say thatsometimes, women do not feelas though they are qualifiedto run for elected office andare more likely not to run, asopposed to their male counter-parts.“As far as campus supportgoes, many organizations aresupportive of women run-ning for office,” Storey said.“Regardless of reasons as towhy more women are not inelected SGA executive posi-tions, Elect Her hopes toreverse that trend.”
News editor Melissa Browncontributed to this report.
WRC encourages women to run for office
Editor | Melissa Brownnewsdesk@cw.ua.edu
Wednesday, December 5, 2012
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to be very popular, especiallyas students complete this veryfirst Winter Interim term andbegin to discuss the successand convenience of the courseswith their peers,” Evans-Bellsaid.Evans-Bell said the idea toimplement a Winter Interimcame from student requests tothe SGA, which responded bysurveying for potential interest.“The University plans toimplement this term every win-ter break so that it becomesa permanent term, like MayInterim,” he said. “As the pro-gram gains more recognition,more professors and studentswill want to participate, whichwill surely result in expansionof the term in regards to num-ber of classes offered and stu-dents registered.”Already, the programseems to have had a favorableresponse from both studentsand faculty.“The last time I checked, Ihad 14 students enrolled, whichis impressive because my initialgoal was 10,” Robin Boylorn, aprofessor in the Department of Communication Studies, said.The courses offered in theWinter Interim range from tra-ditional courses, like personalfinance and geography, to morecreative courses, like ProfessorBoylorn’s “Beyond Sapphireand Jezebel: Representations of Black Women in Film.”The condensed nature of the minimester allows profes-sors like Boylorn to design newcourses that they had beenunable to offer as of yet and seehow they are received.“Interim gives me the chanceto ‘try out’ classes on special-ized topics,” Borlorn said. “Forexample, the course I am teach-ing includes some material thatis discussed in other classes Iteach, but not to the degree thatwe can unpack it in an intensivethree-week period. The classesare extremely intensive, andlike the regular interim ses-sion, we will be packaging asemester’s worth of readingand assignments into a three-week period. I think it is worthit, though, especially when theclasses are creative and the top-ics are appealing.”If the Winter Interim turnsout to be successful, it is likelythat the University will contin-ue to offer the program in addi-tion to the Summer Interim andFall and Spring Semesters.“Of course, with this beingthe first Winter Interim, therewill be a time of assessing andevaluation once the term iscompleted,” Brenda Hunter, theassociate University registrar,said. “The response to WinterInterim has been positive, withstudent enrollment indicat-ing support for an educationalopportunity at this time of theacademic year.”
Winter Interim a chance to engage in new class topics
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